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VOL. LV, No. 10 



NEW YORK CITY, FRIDAY, AUGUST L 1919 



PRICE 15 CENTS 




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VARIETY 



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ERNIE YOUNG 



(OP CHICAGO) 

A NEW AGENT FOR NEW ACTS 

Suite 1211-1212-1213 Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 



MY EXCLUSIVE EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE IS 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH 

B. F. Keith Circuit, Western Vaudeville Association, 
Orpheum Circuit and Affiliations. 

Palace Theatre Building, New York City 



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Vol. LV, No. 10 



PskHAadWart* a« IBM Brtadwy, 

If*. W W WM L ST. T .. 



E?* 



NEW YORK CITY, AUGUST 1, 191» 



Enteral ej second claw matter Reatmfcer 
«, tW5. at the Poet Office at Nc« Tart, 
N. Y., under the Aet of Marek i. ten. 



"WHITE RATS" TITLE DROPPED 
TO BE REPLACED BY NEW NAME 



Vaudeville Artists' Organization Known as White Rats Since 

Founded by George Fuller Golden in 1900. Recent 

Affiliation With Actors' Equity Association 

Obliged Chancre. Now Vaudeville 

Branch of Newest Formation, 
the Four A's. 



6 The name of the White Rats as a 
r title for an actors' organization is 
passing or has passed. A new title is 
to be chosen in its place. That may 
have been done by this time. ' 

The action is the result of'the af- 
filation of fc rthe White Rats with the 
Actor's Equity Association in what is 
.known as the Four A's, a sort of pa- 
rent body holding an .international 
charter with the American Federation 
of Labor. The Rats portion of the 
Four A's is technically known as the 
vaudeville branch. _It was a part of the 
agreement between the A. E. A. and 
the Rats that the name of White Rats 
be abandoned. The actors'. Equity is 
said to have demanded that the. change 
be made. Its principal reason was 
yfhat the Rats as an organization had 
- received much publicity in connection 
with agitation and strikes that were 
not successful. ■* 
The White Rats organization was 
I formed around 1900 with George Ful- 
5 ler Golden, now deceased, its first big 
jvchief. Golden was the first to expound 
his ideals and theories for the pro- 
tection of vaudeville artists. His the- 
ories in the main were substantially 
based, and many of-them have been 
realized by vaudeville artists. Golden 
was greatly beloved by his fellow ar- 
tists and held their esteem to •the .time 
of his death several years ago. Under 
Golden's leadership the Rats went on 
;: strike in 1900 for the abolition of the 
| bookine office commission of five per 
''., cent. Previously variety acts had paid 
| their aeent a commission of five per 
\ cent. The booking office charging five 
made tbe total commission ten per 
i cent., if the act engaged an agent. 
The booking office which imposed the 
jE five per cent, charge was the Mana- 
gers' Association in the St. James 
; Building. D. F. Hennessy was general 
i manager of it. The association then 
booked for many of the present day 
5: big' time managers. The Rats did not 
succeed in having the commission 

5 barge removed. Mr. Hennessy is now 
■ ckarge «f the popular prieed book- 



ing department of the Keith Exchange. 

Following the unsuccessful efforts, 
the Rats was dormant for a few years, • 
until Variety, then a young paper, 
started a series of articles on why ar- 
tists should organize and recommended ' 
the Rats be built up. This revived 
interest in the organization. The Rats 
removed from' a small room in the St. 
James Building to the corner of Broad- 
way and 46th street. Later it built a 
clubhouse on the site of the present 
home of the National Vaudeville Ar- 
tists. The clubhouse was lost to the 
Rats at the collaose of its' second 
strike, starting Jn December, 1916, and 
ending in the spring of 1917. ' 

The Rats has had manv Big Chiefs, 
as its presidents were called, Among 
them have been artists prominent in 
the profession. It was- a secret so-, 
ciety, and its members took an oath- 
bound obligation when iniated. 

The present Big Chief of the Rats 
is James W. Fitzoatrick. He is the 
vice-president of the Four A's. and in 
that caoacity has the direction of the 
vaudeville branch. 

Since the defeat by the managers in 
1917, the Rats has maintained an office 
address in New York for the purpose 
of receiving dues and mail. Its mem- 
bers alleged the officers had a follow- 
ing, but no definite line on its current 
membership has been obtained. The 
Rats, as an organization, 'received a 
heavy blow thrdugh the formation of 
the N. V. A., a society of artists formed 
in opposition of the Rats, and which 
artists were obliged to join. The Fed- 
eral Trade Commis«ion. in its recent 
inquiry into vaudeville, dwelt upon this 
phase during the examination. The 
Rats was popularly supposed to have 
been the real instigator of the Federal 
investigation. 

Many suggestions in the past to 
change the name of the White Rats 
met with rebuffs from the older and 
loyal members. They wanted the name 
to always remain as a memorial for 
Golden who coined it. The word Rats 
we* derived frem ®Wr s? elt Backward*. 



8 WEEKS TO LEAVE ENGLAND. 

After anyone in Engiand has decided 
to, leave for America it will be eight 
weeks from that time before they can 
tail. So aays Fred DeBondy, the 
H B. Marinelli representative/who re-./ 
turned to New York from Havre last 
Thursday. He left New York for Lon- 
don June 30. Mr. DeBondy said he 
remained in. London but a. few days, 
finding there was nothing worth ac- 
complishing in his vaudeville book- 
ing line. .'■■'■ 

Reports of bad food in England just 
now are not borne out by DeBondy's 
statement that he had no fault to find 
with the eats. But the agent says he 
didn't like the transportation system 
as he found it at present over there, 
nor the baggage scheme, while the re- 
peated reporting at polyce stations in 
every new town visited got to his nerves. 
The police station plan is a rigid one 
and must be. followed by all alien trav- 
elers* oyer there.- It is necessary to 
register when entering a city and 
when returning to it. 

Finding the sailings so congested, 
DeBondy left London : for Havre to 
catch the French boat, Touraine. 

The Marinelli representative says 
his credentials mentioned his connec- 
tion with the Marinelli firm as a di- 
rector and there was no secret about 
his visit to London nor his American 
firm. He claims the story of any 
trouble encountered.™ England' by him 
was but the work of English agents. 
DeBondy strongly affirms he had no 
trouble at all. ..•....■ ;.. • 



SUR ATT GOES TO NORWAY. 

Whether to escape the heat or 
Broadway or capture a title in Norway 
may be the reasons why Valeska Suratt 
has gone to that country. 

She left New York the other day 
quietly and with no objective of the 
trip given out to her friends. 



Grace LaRue Trying Out New Play. 

San Francisco, July "30. 

Next Sunday at the Fulton, Oakland, 
Grace Larue Will try out and appear 
in a new play, named "The Wonderful 
Workshon," author unlftiown. 

She will be supported by Hale Ham- 
ilton and the Fulton Players. 

Miss Larue is in her second week 
(current) as a feature at the local Or- 
pheum (vaudeville). 

Secretly Married. 

Evelyn Gosnell and Timmie Sinnott 
of "The Even in r Mail'* have been se- 
cretly wed for about six weks. Miss 
Gosnell was one of the hits of the 
A. H. Woods production "Up in Ma- 
bel's Room." Sinnott has been editing 
the sporting page of the Mail and con- 
ducting a tolnmn on tfcj 1 -publfcatioa, 



SHAW MAT COME. 

London, July 30. 

William A. Brady, while here last 
month, discussed with "George Bernard- 
Shaw going; to America to deliver a 
series of lectures during the coming 
Autumn, No definite conclusion wai 
reached, but it is understood that far 
the; first time Shaw is seriously com 
sidering crossing the water to preseat 
his views personally to American au- 
diences. •>;' 

1 .William. A. Brady, at his office her# 
confirmed the fact that he was dicker 
ing with Shaw to lecture here under 
the Brady management. 
. "We reached ,no' final conclusion," 
said Mr. Brady. "Mr. Shaw promised 
me that he would consider the matter, 
seriously.^ TartTto go back there "in 
the fall. He has promised to give me 
his answer, then, and I think it wilt 
be a favorable one, despite the fact 
that he says, he "thinks the noise here 
will drive him almost crazy The- plan. 
is for the dramatist to tour the coun- 
try, giving twenty-five lectures in all." 

$10,000 GUARANTEES FOR CHOIR. 

More than one-third of the tour of 
the Vatican Choirs and Singers from 
the Roman Basilicas was bopked with* 
in five days after the announcement of 
the plans for the concerts, according 
to J. J. McCarthy and Theodore Mit- 
chell, who are handling, the business 
details of the proposed concerts. : * .. ; 

To date 25 concerts have been con- 
tracted for, each with a guarantee that 
tbe Choir's share will not be leas than 
$10,000* per performance. The dates 
thus far set are Baltimore. Philadel- 
phia, Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
Des Moines. .Omaha, St. Louis, Oeve- 
land, Columbus. Davton, Indianapolis, 
Kansas City, Seattle, Portland, San 
Francisco. Oakland. Los Angeles, Mon- 
treal, Ottawa and Toronto, 

The $10,000 guarantee a performance 
surpasses the figures' reached by the 
Caruso concert tour of last spring and 
the regular Grand Opera guarantees 
for a full performance. 



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A NEW SONG "PLUG » 

Chicago. July 30. 

A song ptugger works between the 
acts at the Garrick, where "Scandaf 
is Maying. 

This is the first time this has hap- 
pened in a legitimate theatre this sea- 
son. The house seems to take kindly 
to the innovation. 



Frank Q. Doyle Producing Girt Acts. 

Chicago, July 30. 
Although Frank Q. Doyle has taken 
on the production of srirl act* for 
vaudeville, he continue* his vaudeville 

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BIG FIGHT IMPENDING FOR 

CONTRO L OF EN GLISH HALLS 

Stoll Arranging to Build in Opposition to Moss Empires and 

Variety Controlling Houses in Provinces. Has Secured 

Three Sites. Liverpool, Leeds and Brighton Scenes 

for First Clash. Moss to Rebuild Several Houses. 



London, July 30. 

The acquisition -by Sir Oswald Stoll 
•f the Bee Hotel site in Liverpool, the 
City Square in Leeds and the Clock 
Tower in Brighton seems to presage 
a battle royal for the control of the 
music hall situation in England, with 
Stoll at the head of the faction that is 
to give fight to the Moss Empires and 
the Butt-DeFrece interests in the Va- 
rietv Controlling Co. " 

Stoll in addition to having his own 
circuit and being .a director in the 
Gulliver Tour (formerly Gibbons Cir- 
cuit), and of which Charles Gulliver is 
the managing director, is going to 
build three halls, each costing a mil- 
lion dollars, because he was unable to 
have his own way in becoming inter- 
ested in the other circuits. 

At the time of the dissolufion of the 
If oss and Stoll circuit some years ago 
there was an agreement between the 
two partners whereby Stoll was to 
keep out of the Moss towns for a 
period of years. This agreement has 
evidently run out. In other locations 
where the houses of the two conflicted 
there was an agreement as to the play- 
ing of acts. 

. In the building of the three new halls 
Gulliver is supposed to be interested 
with Stoll. Frederick Matcham has 
been engaged to draw the plans. 

Meantime the Moss interests have" 
made arrangements for the rebuilding 
of several of the houses on their cir- 
cuit with a view to increasing capa- 
city to meet the coming onslaught of 
the opposition. 

SACKS HOLDS MAJORITY. 

London, July 30. 
The purchase by J. L. Sacks of the 
stock of George Foster in the J. L. 
Sacks, Ltd., gives Sacks the control of 
that company. This eliminates all of 
the outside interests with the excep- 
tion- of those held by William J. Wil- 
son, the producer, and Arthur Voegtlin, 
who handles the American end of the 
affairs of the firm. 



"LITTLE WIDOWS" MOVING. 

London, July 30. 
"His Little Widows" which has been 
holding forth at Wyndham's moves at 
the end of this week to the Garrick, 
succeeding "Nobody's Boy" at that 
house. The latter piece is to be recast 
and tried again. Despite failure here, 
looks good for America. 



"BANTAM, V. C w IS OFF. 

London, July 30. 

"Bantam, V. C." was withdrawn at 
Martin's, July 24. 

Albert de Courvilfe revived "The 
Very Idea" there July 25. Easton, 
Pickering and Ethel Ward are playing 
the leading roles. 

•THE BOY" ENDING LONG STAY. 

London, July 30. 
"The Boy" will be withdrawn from 
the Adelphi Aug. 9, after its 800th per- 
formance, making way for "Who's 
Hooper," a new musical play based on 
the farce "In Chancery." 

NEW COMEDY AT AMBASSADORS. 

London, July 30. 

"The Latest Craze," which Miss 

Gladys Lloyd has been presenting at 

the Embassadors is to be withdrawn 

on Aug. 2, ana sent on tour. The next 



attraction scheduled for the house is 
a comedy by John Walton entitled 
"Green Pastures and Picadilly." 



BUTT ENGAGES RUSSIAN BALLET. 

London, July 30. 
Sir Alfred Butt has signed the Rus- 
sian Ballet and will continue its en- 
gagement at the Empire after its pres- 
ent season at the Academy closes. 
Butt has arranged with Richard Wal- 
ton Tully, to produce "The Bird of 
Paradise." at the Lyric in September. 



THEATRICAL BOOM OVER. 

London, July 30. 

The theatrical boom that began after 
the armistice is now definitely con- 
cluded. Many theatres/ are closing. 
Others are doing badly. 

The variety houses, however, are 
still playing to good business-. 



COCHRAN ANNOUNCES SEVEN. 

London, July 30. 
Although he has made no arrange- 
ment with the Actors' Association, 
Charles B. Cochran has announced 
that he will have made seven new 
productions by February, mostly musi- 
cal. •:■•■■ 



TEDDIE GERRAD REMAINS. 

. London, July 30. 
Teddie Gerrad. who was to have 
sailed for New York last week to ap- 
pear under the management of-A. H. 
Woods, canceled her reservation at the 
last minute and decided to remain in 
London. A new contract for a new 
play under the management of Charles 
B. Cochran is the reason. 

A. H. Woods stated.he has not heard 
that Miss Gerrad had changed her mind 
regarding coming to America. 



Walk Out of Alhambra Rehearsals 
London, July 30. 

Huntley Wright and Gus McNaueh- 
ton have withdrawn from rehearsal for 
the new Alhambra revue. 

Both "had disagreements with Oscar 
Asche, who is staging it. 



'Too Many Cooks" for Savoy. 

London, July 30. 
Frank Craven, who is here with his 
wife, has arranged with Gilbert Miller 
to produce "Too Many Cooks" at the 
Savoy in August. 



Rock and White Sailing. 

London, July 30. 
William Rock and Frances White, 
booked to return on the Lapland, will 
sail tomorrow (Aug. 1.) 



Rowland Coming Back. 

London, July 30. 
Richard Rowland, president of the 
Metro, is sailing for home on the first 
available boat. 



Variety again at the Holborn. 

London, July 30. 
Now that the Holborn has given up 
its revue and pone back to varietv, 
Georpe Carney is appearing there in 
a single act. He has in preparation 
a burlesque of "Cyrano de Bergerac." 

Hedges Bros, and Jacobson Reunited. 

London, July 30. 
Hedges Bros, and Jacobson have re- 
united after five veers. 



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L L 9 



AGENTS AND MANAGERS COMING. 

London, July 30. 

There is an influx of English agents 
imminent, many • planning shortly to 
sail for New York. >* 

Ernest Edelstein sails Aug. 10 on the 
Baltic, Tommy Dawe a fortnight later, 
and, in turn, others from the firm, in- 
cluding Paul Murray, Jimmy Tate and 
Julian Wylie. Others sailing shortly 
are Percy Reiss, Joe Shoebridge, . 
Harry Burns, and Willie Edelstein. 

Producing managers are also sail- 
ing, but all are keeping their British 
tailings secret in an effort to forestall 
the others. Among these are Albert 
de Courville, Albert Sacks, Andre 
Chariot, Gilbert Miller, Edward Lau- 
rillard and probably Sir Alfred Butt. 

J. GRAYDON DEAN DIES. 

London, July 30. 
J. Graydon Dean, one of the best 
known music hall managers here and 
director of the Palace, died July 28, 
aged 76. 

PANIC OVER DELAYED SAILINGS. 

London, July 30. 
Among American artists there is a 
panic here brought' about by their in- 
ability to return home, doe to post- 
poned sailings. 



V. A. F. CHAIRMAN RESIGNS. 

London, July 30. 

Fred Russell, Chairman of the V. A. 
F., has tendered his resignation to the 
artists' organization and the same has 
been accepted. It is to take effect at 
the end of September. The nomina- 
linns for his successor close on 
August 7. 

The V. A. F. will hold a meeting 
Aug. 10 to choose Russell's successor. 
The - meeting will decide whether to 
select an honorary chairman who will 
be practically a figurehead or make 
the office a strictly business one with 
the occupant of it from commercial lines 
and on a salary. Anyone elected will 
be debarred from stage appearance 
during his -term. 



RECORD CROWD AT HIGH PRICES. 

London, July 30. 
At the command performance at. the 
Coliaeum July 28 there was a record 
attendance at the record price of five 
guineas. 



BURTON MANAGING LORRAINE. 

London, July 30. 
Percy Burton has become business 
manager for Robert Lorraine who is 
appearing at the Duke of York's in 
"Cyrano" under his own management 
There is a possibility that Lorraine 
may visit America during the coming 
season and present the piece there. 

New House Opened by Prince Albert. 

London, July 30. 
Prince Albert opened the new Princ- 
ess theatre at Crayford, Kent, this 
week. It was erected for the Vickers 
work people. Louis Calvert is produc- • 
ing the American play, "Dadlums," 
there. 



Novelto Trio Is New Musical. 
London, Tuly 30. 
At the Palladium, Marie Novelto is 
presenting a new artistic musical act, 
billed as the Novelto Trio. She is at 
the piano, Ethel Varick is the violin- 
ist and Philip - Simmons the tenor 
singer. 



New Leading Lady in "Buzz Buzz." 

London, July 30. 
"Buzz Buzz" at the Vaudeville has 
passed its 300th performance with 
Heater Thatcher,' the new leading lady, 
making a highly successful debut 



Successful at Euston. 

London, July 30. 
At the Euston, Copland and McLeod 
and the Two Cases Boys recently made 
successful debuts. 



Al Stern Is Now Al Lewis. 

London, July 30. 

Al Lewis, the character comedian, 
opened at the Palace successfully. 

He is known in American as Al 
Stern. 



Beauty Contests in Gulliver's Halls. 

London, July 30. 
Gulliver's Halls in Polar, Putney, 
Will-Esden and Islington are featur- 
ing beauty contests this wek 



Romanian Tenor at Drury Lane. 

London, July 30. 
At the Drury Lane, Constantin 
Stroesco, a Romanian tenor, has suc- 
cessfully taken the part df Angle 
PeWut. - 



TETRAZZINI REOPENING. 

London, July 30. 
Luisa Tetrazzini, the prima donna, 
reappears at Albert Hall, Aug. 2, after 
five years' absence from the concert 
stage. 

Soldiers at Savoy. 

London, July 30. 
Gilbert Miller intends to present the 
army entertainers known as "Les_ 
Rouges et Les Noir Program" at the 
Savoy. 

It consists of short plays and bur- 
lesque. 
Soldiers impersonate chorus girls. 



"Keep 'Em Alive" Opens. 

- London, July 30. 
At the Finsbury Park, Albert de 
Courville produced the touring revue, 
"Keep 'Em Alive," this week with Jack 
Gallagher, George Manton, Mabelle 
George and Lillian Major in the prin- 
cipal parts. 

"Latest Craze" Coming Off. 

London, July 30. 

'TheLatest Craze" will be withdrawn 
from the Ambassadors Aug. 2 

Aug. 6 Agnes Piatt will present there 
a comedy called "Green Pastures and 
Piccadilly." 



"Business" Going to Prince**. 

London, July 30. 

George B. McLellan will transfer 
"Business Before Pleasure" from the 
Savoy to Prince's, Aug. 4. 

Yorke and Leonard are continuing as 
Potash and Perlmutter. 



"Jack O' Jingles" in the Fall. 

London, July 30. 
Leon. Lion will present "Jack 0' Jin- 
gles" in the fall at the New theatre. 
He and Malcolm Cherry are the au- 
thors. 



Palladium Leads with Victory Bonds. 

London, July, 30. 
The Palladium headed the variety 
theatres selling the Victory Loan, se- 
curing $155,000. 



Helen Ferrer* Is Back on the Stage. 

London, July 30. 
HelenFerrers, a war nurse for three 
yeaxSi > .has returned to the stage. 



"Lady of Lyons" Revival. 

London, July 30. 
Nettlefold will revive .'The Lady 
of Lyons" at the Scala, Aug.2, 



"Naughty Wife" Ending Run. 
London, July 30. 
'The Naughty Wife" will be with- 
drawn at the Playhouse Aug. 2. 



Kingsway, London, Dark. 

London, July 30. 
The Kingsway is closed pending a 
new produetHm is the autumn. 






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V A U D EVI L L E 






VAUDEVILLE LOSES SCHENCK 
WITH PICTURES GAINING HIM 

Has Been Booking Manager for Loew Circuit Since Circuit 

Started. Schenck Now Heavily Interested in Film 

Business, With Several Stars Under His 

Personal Direction. Leaves Loew 

Office Sept 1. 



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. Vaudeville will lose one of the most 
popular members of its executive div- 
ision when Joseph M. Schenck retires 
from the Marcus Loew Circuit Sept. 
1, next. Mr. Schenck intends thereaf- 
ter to devote his time exclusively to 
the picture business, in which he is 
heavily interested at pr.esent. He will 
locate in an orfce of his own around 
Times square. 

Mr. Schenck's present activities in 
tiims includes the personal direction 
by him of Norma Talmadge (Mrs. 
Schenck), Constance Talmadge, Fatty 
Arbuckle, "Mutt and Jeff" film car- 
toons, and Special Films, Inc., a com- 
pany incorporated by Mr. Schenck to 
handle special films, as its title indic- 
ates. - 

Schenck has been singularly suc- 
cessful in advantageously placing his 
stars. He has made contracts for 
each, aggregating for all many mil- 
lions of dollars. His personal profit 
for 1919 has been estimated by picture 
men at between $1,500,000 and $2,000,- 
000. 

Joe Schenck was equally as success- 
ful in vaudeville. He has been the book- 
ing manager of the Loew Circuit since 
its inception, though of late months 
Jake Lubin, who succeeds as general 
booking manager of the circuit, has 
been in charge of the Loew route 
sheets.. Making up programs in a de- 
partment of vaudeville then undevel- 
oped (the pop price or three-a-day) 
Mr. Schenck kept abreast of the new 
condition and saw the Loew Circuit 
grow from. its one experimental the- 
atre' to the big chain it now is. 

Mr. Schenck is also interested, with . 
his brother Nick, in Palisades Park, on 
the highlands of the Jersey shore, op- 
posite 125th street 



FISHER LEAVES BAYES. 

Unless the difficulty is adjusted 
meanwhile Irving Fisher will not be 
Norah B ayes' juvenile in "Ladies First" 
the coming season. Miss^Bayes has 
asked the agents to locate another 
young man in his place. 

Fisher has been with Miss Bayes for 
'several seasons. He lately essayed a 
single act in vaudeville. Since showing 
it Fisher is reported to have asked $750 
weekly for the turn. No bookings at 
that figure have yet been entered. 

Miss Bayes is to appear as a vaude- 
ville headlmer at Keith's, Atlantic City, 
Aug. 11. The booking was made direct 

Atlantic City, July 30. 
Norah Bayes will receive $2,000 for 
her week at Keith's, here, commencing 
Aug. 11. Irving Fisher will appear that 
week with Miss. Bayes. 

NOT TOMMY GRAY'S BROTHER. 

Tommy Gray says he has no brother 
borrowing money on his name. Tom- 
my heard someone in the West was 
representing himself as a relative and 
making soft touches from artists. 

Tommy does say that, as this im- 
poster was successful, he would like 
to engage him as a collector. Tommy 
adds he has several bills against actors 
that he can't get any money on him- 
self. 



MONEY FOR ALLIE LESLIE. 

William O'Donnell, nephew of the 
late John Howley, is making a search 



for the widow, -known professionally 
as Allie Leslie. Howley was at one 
time a partner of Patsy Ooyla and the 
act was known as Howley and Doyle, 
later it was Howley and Leslie. The 
last heard of Miss 'Leslie was that she 
was in the .west somewhere. 

William O'Donnell sought out Doyle 
this week and told him that there was 
considerable money coming to Miss 
Leslie, if she could be located. She is 
to receive something over $20,000. 

O'Donnell can be reached at 31 Say- 
brook place, Newark, N. J. 



KELLY AND POLLOCK RETURN. 

After one year, to the day, of service 
as entertainers for the A. E. F., James 
Kelly and Emma Pollock returned to 
New York Wednesday. 

They came in on a French steamer, 
catching it at Marseilles, to avoid the 
delay of securing transportation home 
now prevalent in England. 

Mr. Kelly and Miss Pollock went 
abroad before the war ended. • 



POL1 MEETING. 
The fourth annual meeting of the 
executive staff and managers of the 
Poli*circuit will be held next Sunday, 
August 3, at Cherry Hill Farm, Bran- 
ford, Conn. . . 



Managers Not Decided on Defense. 

The attorneys for the vaudeville 
managers, named as respondents in the 
Federal Trade Commission action 
against them, have not yet decided 
whether they will enter a defense. 

It is understood the counsel so in- 
formed the Commission in response to 
its recent letter to respondents making 
inquiry as to whether the respondents 
would defend themselves, and asking if 
they did to hasten the date of the 
hearings. 

Berlin Postpones Opening. 

The vaudeville reappearance of 
Irving Berlin, virtually set for next 
Monday, at the Palace, New York, has 
been postponed by Mr. Berlin. 

His agents, Rose & Curtis, had about 
closed the date with George Gottlieb 
when Berlin asked it be put off until 
after the season opens, when he will 
take six "weeks in vaudeville around 
New York. 



Moroaeo's Producing Corporation; 

The Oliver Morosco Co., a new cor- 
poration organized by House, Gross- 
man & Vorhaus with Morosco, F. Un- 
derwood and J. D. Barnes, as incor- 
porators, capitalized at $5,000, has been 
formed for the purpose of producing 
burlesque, plays, operas and vaude- 
ville. 



You'll Have to Figure This Out. 

Flo Lewis has given Jimmy Hussey 
notice of intention to leave his act and 
intends to join her husband, Jay Gould, 
in the Herman Timberg turn. Hussey 
and Timberg are both on the Harry 
Webber books. 



Harry Seymour Divorced. 

Thelma Seymour, a "Passing Show" 
girl, secured a divorce from Harry 
Seymour last week. 

Seymour is of Seymour, Dempsey 
and Seymour in vaudeville. 



HOTEL NEWS. 

Buffalo, July 30. 

Buffalo hotels leaped into the lime- 
light twice this week. The Lafayette 
almost had a panic Thursday after- 
noon when George L. Gastel was lured 
into a room on a pretext and badly 
horsewhipped by George W. Koch, well 
known in theatrical circles. Gastel 
went to the hotel to keep a business 
engagement with "Hugo Garfield." He 
was shown to a room where he was 
set on by Koch and a party of friends. 
Koch pursued him down the stairs 
and through the lobby brandishing the 
whip. Regular mining-town, hotel 
stuff! Koch alleged to the newspaper 
.men that Gastel had stolen his wife 
and broken up his home. Koch was 
formerly connected with Charlie Fil- 
brick, the billposter of days gone bye. 

Baggs Hotel is the other calcium hos- 
telry. A young woman said to have 
been visiting friends .opened a door 
to step onto the fire-escape and fell 
.three stories. What the young worn-* 
an desired of the fire escape is not 
known, and the hotel people refused 
to give any further -information. The 
doctor who was summoned took the 
girl to the Memorial Hospital for 
treatment The physician testified a 
man named "Joe" accompanied them. 
"Joe," according to the doctor, is the 
manager of a burlesque show of which 
the young woman is a member, and of 
which he is the manager. He stated 
that they have been playing the Aca- 
demy* and that he ("Joe") just pur- 
chased that house. 

The polu 4 say that the girl is Arlone 
Richards, 22, .of Detroit, who is em- 
ployed in a Pearl street restaurant as 
a pianist and that the accident occur- 
red while "seeking fresh air." This is 
the fourth time an accident of this 
sort has happened recently at Baggs, 
but the . management asserts it will 
adhere to its established policy of no 
extra charge for falling guests even- 
though they slightly damage the fire 
escapes. 



• AUTO SMASH ON BRIDGE. 

Joe Leo, of the Fox office, had nine 
front teeth knocked out, and Lew Bush, • 
vaudeville agent, jind a young woman 
described as Mary Williams were both 
badly battered as the result of a col- 
lision between Leo's Cadillac and a 5- 
ton commercial truck in the. middle of 
the Manhattan Bridge shortly after 
8:30 Saturday night The driver of the 
truck was seriously injured. 

Leo and his party were on their way 
to Far Rockaway, and Bush claims they 
were feeling their, way along at eight 
mites an hour because of darkness 
occasioned by a thunder storm, which 
was brewing at the time. The driver 
of the truck, which had been halted 
for repairs, was tinkering with the 
mechanism in the rear of his car. Ha 
was caught between the two vehicle* 
and badly crushed about the head and 
chest' 

According to Bush the truck showed . 
no lights and the Manhattan Bridge- 
lights had not been, turned on despite 
the gloom caused by the impending 
storm. Leo, who was driving, declares 
the truck loomed up out of the dark- . 
ness so suddenly a collision was un- 
avoidable. * -:.';.• ■„ .' 

, The Leo car was completely smashed 
All of the injured were removed to 
the hospital and later taken to their 

homes. ••. . 



ACT LOSES NO TIME. 

George Clark, of Clark and Shop- 
pell, takes the "brown deby" for getting 
up an act in the shortest space of time. 

When his partner, Harry Shoppell, 
•passed away Tuesday morning at 5.30, 
after a short illness of pnemnonja, 
Clark secured Eddie Crawford, a for- 
mer team mate of his, to play out the 
Clark-Shoppell dates, opening on the' 
Loew time that same afternoon. 



DOUBLE FEATURES ADDED. 

Probably in an effort to maintain 
the same standard -of attendance dur- 
ing the hot months, the smaller Keith 
and Proctor houses are taking to run- 
ning double feature films each week, 
in addition to an augmented vaudeville 
program. 

As practised at the Harlem O. H., 
particularly, S. R. O. is the result many 
a tihie. The 23rd Street will inaugu- 
rate the same policy next week as 
will several other houses. 



BLONDELL AN AUTHOR, 

Arthur Blondell, whose theatrical ac- 
tivities have heretofore been confined 
to the booking of vaudeville acts, has 
blossomed forth as a songwriter, his 
initial effort being "If I But Thought 
You Meant It," written in collaboration 
with Ben Barnett, of the Keith office. 
Gus Edwards heard the number at a 
local theatre recently and has decided 
to interpolate it in his new show. 



Miles, a Steady Climber. 

Homer Miles has been promoted to 
superintendent and assistant to Man- 
ager Crull, of the Prospect, Brooklyn. 

Miles started at the Prospect as a 
cleaner and advanced via stage door 
tender, box office, etc., to his present 
berth. 



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A. PAUL KEITH' ESTA fE. 

Boston, July 30. 

The filing of an inyentery of the 
estate of the late A. Paul Keith by the ' 
special administrator, John P. Gor- 
man, showed that Mr. Keith had per* 
sonally invested in $217,800 of Liberty. 
Bonds, asjde from those purchased by 
him as president of the various the- * 
atrical enterprises with which he was 
connected. His personal estate was 
$2,663,511 and his real estate reached. 
a total of $1,207,245, making a grand 
total of $3,870,756. 

. In this is not included his holdings 
in real' estate outside of Massachu- 
setts, whicn are understood to be 
much larger than his holdings in this • 
state. 

There were miscellaneous stocks and 
bonds amounting to $577,324.84 and the ■ 
balance was' almost exclusively in- "' 
vested in his business. 



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COOLING SYSTEM NECESSARY. 

Recalling a certain act that coul< 
fill a particular spot on one of his 
programs, Johnnie Collins, in th« 
Keith office, wrote the act offering th* 
date. A reply came with the condition 
the' management would be accepted if 
the theatre had a cooling system in- 
stalled. Mr. Collins sent back word 
he was not quije sure whether the 
theatre held a cooling system but he 
felt positive many fans would be there 
and other precautions taken against 
the heat. 

The final answer received was e de- 
clination of the contract by the act 
(single man) who stated he felt he 
could not appear in any theatre that 
did not have a properly equipped cool- 
ing system. 

Collins also felt he needed one him- 
self after reading the letter. 



• 






. -'■, 



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Cartmell Given Production Release 

Charles Cartmell (Cartmell end 
Harris) has retired from the new "Hit- 
chy-Koo," the producers agreeing to 
release Cartmell from the production 
Deca «se of his existing contracts with 
the Orpheum Circuit, the cancellation 
of which would cause a large financial 
loss to the team. 

Mrs. Cartmell, who had been ill, has 
sufficiently recovered to proceed with 
her stage work. 



r< 



Martha Lawrence Flaring "Sweeties." 
Lillian Berse, in vaudeville with 
"Sweeties," resigned last week, due to 
salary. She was replaced by Martha 
Lawrence. 






V-. .-. 
■';• ■ ' • ■ : . ' 

■ '■ •' ' ■ 

ma 



* VAUDEVILLE 



. ■;■; ,•-.-. . . , .... • - ' '. * ■:■•/■ ';•;. 



Y. M. C. A. WANTS ALL CREDIT 
FOR ACTORS' WORK OVERSEAS 






:l:: r '. r ':: 



Profession Feels Latest Move on Part of Association Another 
Desire to Offend. Over There Theatre League Origi- 
nated and Formed by Theatrical People. Y. M. G. A. 
Issuing Pins and Certificates for Service. 



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■■■■■: ■-:,:■ •■:•■■ 
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It may be coincidental that the 
Young Men's Christian Association 
usually manages to offend the theat- 
rical profession. Several artists be- 
lieve the latest move of the Y. M. C. A. 
in connection with the show business 
is but another instance of it. 

• This week entertainers who went 

abroad under the auspices of the Over 

|f; 4; There Theatre League received cer- 

sfev ' tificates of service from the Y. M. C. A. 

m The certificate states that the holder 

S: "Served as an actor with the Over- 

^W; '■"':"■■ .seas Theatrical League."* 

The Overseas Theatrical League is 
the name of the Y. organization that 
took over the affairs of the Over There 

5 '-: Theatre League. The recipients of the 

• : !i certificates do not understand why the 

Y. wanted the entire -credit when the 
Over There Theatre League was form- 
ed by the theatrical people at the re- 
quest of General Pershing to. take up 

Ipj .■'■ : a department the Y. had neglacted at 
home and in France. 
The Y. has also sent entertainers an 

.i- enamel pin, indicating service over 

'*!> :.;.;: there' . 



ERNIE YOUNG BACK HOME. 

Ernie Young of Chicago is back in 
Chicago. Mr. Young picked last Mon- 
day to end his summer Broadway run, 
that lasted with the new vaudeville 
manager for about three weeks. He 
went to Philadelphia, then hied himself 
westward. 

Mr. Young has attracted quite some 
attention theatrically to himself of late 
through a series of advertisements in 
VARiETr, announcing his new agency 
business in Chi. Mr. Young laid out a 
campaign of advertising, using Varibtt, 
and started it with several pages in 
one issue. While in Mew York he 
favorably commented upon the benefits 
received through the publicity. His 
visit to the metropolis was more in the 
way of renewing old friendships than 
for any especial business reason, 
though while in New York he arranged 
for a mutual business representation 
between the Ray Hodgdon and his own 
offices. 



LIGHT'S ANNUAL CRUISE ON. 

The Lights' annual "cruise" campaign 
started Monday, and the first three 
days' receipts showed a vast improve- 
ment over previous years. 

The "cruise" is members of the club 
for this week only, playing one night 
stands through Long Island and New 
Jersey. The net proceeds go to the 
club. 

Monday night in Plainfield the gross 
was $1,187. Tuesday at Freeport, L. I., 
(local theatre) $1,373. 

E. F. Albee donated $1,000 in the fol- 
lowing letter. >. 
The Lights, 

Freeport, L. I. 
Gentlemen : 

As has been my custom the past two 
years, I am enclosing you a check for 
One Thousand ($1,000) dollars to add 
to the receipts of your yearly "cruise." 

Your organization should meet with 
great success, as it is founded on the 
proper principles for enjoyment, help- 
fulness to its members and good fel- 
lowship, which all makes life the more 
worth living for. 

Please accept this check with my very 



best wishes that your club with each 
succeeding year, will grow in strength-, 
importance and prosperity. 

Very cordially yours, 
(Signed) E. F. Albeo. 



HOUSES OPENING. 

The following houses, dark for the 
summer, will reopen as follows : Prin- 
cess, Montreal, and Lyric, Hamilton, 
Aug. 18; Shea's, Toronto, Aug. 11. 

The Dominion, Ottawa, will close for 
one week, from Aug. 2, for improve- 
ments. ■'. • 

Shea's, Toronto, will open Aug. 11. 



$10 More Weekly Asked by Musicians. 

Youngstown, O., July 30. 
| The musicians and stage hands, act- 
ing in concert, have demanded a raise 
of $10, weekly each in all of the local 
theatres. 
The managers are opposing it. 



RICHARD WHEELER'S SIDE. 

In a letter addressed from Cairo, 
Egypt, Richard Wheeler (Wheeler and 
Dolan) tells his version of the trouble 
in Bombay, where he was imprisoned 
for five months early this year. The 
charge against Mr. Wheeler was as- 
saulting Captain Webb-Johnson, a 
military surgeon. 

The Wheeler and Dolan AH-Amer- 
ican Vaudeville Co. opened in Calcutta 
July 11, 1918. The tropical heat af- 
fected many of the artists, so badly 
that they had to have medical atten- 
tion and Capt. Webb-Johnson was 
called in. From that time on Johnson 
was a daily visitor back stage, and im- 
mediately started to force his atten- 
tions upon Gertrude Dolan, Wheeler's 
dancing partner. Mr. Wheeler warned 
Miss Dolan and the other women of 
the company of Captain Webb-John- 
son's reputation, and they gave him 
a wide berth. Finally he was forbid- 
den by the management to go behind 
the stage. 

According to Mr. Wheeler, from then 
on Webb Johnson did all in his power 
to hurt the show and the reputations 
of the players, both men and women. 
The iatter's actions so incensed. Mr. 
Wheeler that on meeting Webb-John- 
son, later in Bombay, where he con- 
tinued his persecution Wheeler gave 
him a sound thrashing. Mr. Wheeler 
was later arrested, charged with as- 
saulting an officer in uniform and sen- 
tenced to "five months', rigorous im- 
prisonment." 

Shortly after the trial and convic- 
tion of Mr. Wheeler, Captain Webb- 
Johnson left' India. v 



Al Swemon, William Townsend, Nor- 
man Wendell and. Edith Spencer will 
replace Dave Herblin, Maurice Frank- 
lin, Fred C. "Barron and Rita Davis 
with the Orpheum Players. Montreal. 
Harry Anderson succeeds Walter Clark 
Bellons as stage director of the stock. 



Crescent Policy Undecided. \ 
' Syracuse, July 30. 
The Crescent Theatre, Syracuse, 
playing pop vaudeville last season, 
boo':ed through the Family Dept. of 
the Keith Exchange, may play bur- 
lesque next season. 




CLAIRE STARR 

with 

WILL KING 

IndeCiilUly 



RAYS FROM THE LIGHTS. 

(From tbe Light? Club, Freeport, L. I.) 

Last Saturday night the master 
electrician who operates the switch- 
board up iii Heaven produced one of the 
most spectacular "storm effects" that 
New York and vicinity has ever seen. 
The rain came down in torrents and 
the lightning flashes were dazzling in 
their brilliancy. The -thunder was ter- 
rific. The storm lasted for about three 
hours, during which time it did much 
damage to property, and made the j 
Long Island roads almost impossible 
to travel. . . 



During severe electrical storms, an 
indicator down in the village gives . 
warning of dangerous lightning just 
before the flash comes and all the 
lights in the town are turned off until - 
alter the- danger is passed. Saturday 
night the lights were switched on and | 
oft every few seconds, matting it rather 
disagreeable far our guests, for the ; 
duration of the. storm. 



Wednesday was supposed to be Hal- 
lo we en, but our entertainment com- 
mittee was so busy preparing for. our 
annual cruise, that they failed to ar- 
range the usual hallowe en games, etc, •' 
for that evening. Those present had 
a very enjoyable evening and seemed 
pertectly contented with the dancing;' 
and the ad lib clowning. 



There was a double-header on our 
baseball ground Saturday afternoon. 
The nrst game was between the Lights 
and the N. V. A. and the second be- 
tween the Nassau Athletic Club and 
the Lights. We thought we were go- 
ing to beat the N. V. A. and up to the 
sixth inning it looked like it could be 
done, 'the score was lour to two in 
our lavor, but the N. V. A.'s got three 
runs, one in each of the last three in- 
nings, without giviug us- a chance to 
get any more ot our men home. So 
the game finished five to tour, with the 
N. V. A.'s the victors. We beat, the 
Nassau Athletic Club three to nothing. - 

Skipper Albert Von Tilzer gave us 
a show Saturday night, and the club 
was packed to the doors. We had 
to turn quite a number ot people away. 
The show started with Wilbur Sweat- 
man and his Jazz three, and how he 
did start itl That's Jazz what is Jazz! 
Wayne and the Warren Girls, Eddie 
Miner, Val and Ernie Stanton, Eva 
Puc«i, Alex. Carr, Geo. McKay, Dooley 
and Sayies, Freda Leonard, and Wm 
Kent were the artists that decorated 
our stage and collectively and indi- 
vidually they were a tremendous suc- 
cess. 



There were two surprises in the 
way of clown numbers that helped 
nia,te Skipper Von Tilzer's night one 
of the best yet Victor Moore and- 
Herbert Williams (William and Wolf- 
us) put on an old-time two-men act; 
boob make-ups, a couple of newspapers 
and some of the oldest gags that mem- 
ory could dig up. Their act included 
burlesque paper-tearing and cartoon- 
ing while singing pathetic ballads. 
Needless to say, they were a scream. 
Then came The Bowery After Dark. A : 
real melodrama in two acts, with an 
all star cast? Tom Dugan was the 
soldier-hero, made up as a dashing ju- 
venile. Frank Tinney was the heav£ 
with a typical ten, twenty and thirty" 
"dirty worker" make-up. Lew Kelly- 
was a "Chink" and tool of the heavy.i 
Eddie Carr was "Little Nell" and Frank 
Westphal was "another good woman 
gone wrong." Harry Sullivan was a 
policeman. The melodrama was very 
well played and every line was a "yelL" 

We had a great night in spite of the 
storm, and we want our brother and 
sister professionals to come down and 
brighten their Wednesday and Satur-, 
day nights. So long, see you ad lib. % 



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■■■" -* "DEVILL" 



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TO ABOLISH INTERMISSIONS 

BECAUSE OF PROHIBITION 



: ; 



Vaudeville House Managers Claim That It Slows Up the Show. 
Was Begun Years Ago So House Could Sell 
Booze. Now Ice Cream Parlors Are 
Taking Saloons' Place. < 



Now that prohibition seems assured 
a prominent eastern theatrical man- 
ager «is of the opinion that intermis- 
sions will be eliminated from all 
vaudeville and burlesque houses in the 
near future. ' 

The .managers have long contended 
that an intermission slowed up a show 
and that a vaudeville act drawing the ' 
opening intermission spot had to con- 
tend with the same conditions that 
make the No. 1 spot obnoxious. An- 1 
other angle is the salary paid, an act in 
this position, and the antagonism of 
artists when offered that position, with 
a resulting deterioration in value re- 
ceived. 

- In the old days when theatres were 
licensed to sell liquor and the ven- 
ders passed among the vaudeville atid 
burlesque patrons offering their wares 
there was no thought of an intermis- 
sion, i 

As show business advanced legisla- 
tion came into being that obliterated 
the beverages from the theatres and 
the property adjoining the houses was 
utilized as a haven for the thirsty. 
It was often controlled by the theatre 
owners and the intermission was a 
natural development. 

Since the installation of the torrid 
legislation a noticeable change has 
come over the complexion of the prop- 
erties adjoining theatres. Ice cream 
parlors and orange juice booths have 
supplanted the saloons. A Western 
manager who recently installed an ice 
cream booth in his theatre has sounded 
the key note for a new source of rev- 
enue for the theatre owner. This en- 
terprising individual eliminated his in- 
termissions and the thirsty patrons can 
get refreshments by a visit to the back 
of the house any time during the per- 
formance. He argues that the new or- 
der makes a hit with his female pat- 
rons who remain stated during inter- 
mission and endured the desertion of 
male escorts because it was a matter 
of custom. 



N. V. A. COMPLAINTS. 

La Pearl and Blondell, alleged to 
have sent a telegram to Jules Delmar 
while playing the Bijou, Knoxville, and 
signing Manager Don Trent's name to 
it, endeavoring to secure future dates, 
were severely reprimanded. They 
promised the N. V. A. officials that it 
would never happen again. 

Billy Goulett has entered a complaint 
against Mr. Harris to restrain the 
latter from using a certain song num- 
ber. 

Crazy Quilts claim that the "Gaieties 
of 1919" is using one of their exclusive 
song numbers. 

Harrison Green (Green and Parker) 
protests against the billing of Gray 
and Parker, claiming conflict ion in the 
similarity of names. 

Wilbur C. Sweatman against Brooks 
and George to restrain the latter from 
billing themselves as the originators 
of 2- and 3-B flat clarinet playing. 

Blanche Ring claims that a certain 
Flo Ring is occasionally billing herself 
as Blanche. 



MAKING YIDDISH RECORDS. 

Boris Thomashefsky, the Yiddish 
tragedian, Louis Schenker, who is "an- 
geling" the proposition, and Abner 
Greenberg, the theatrical attorney, are 
named as incorporators of the Tho- 



mashefsky Record Co., which is capi- 
talized at $50,000. £ 
It has been formed primarily to ex- 
ploit the vocal efforts of the localYid- 
dish Al Jolson, employing the hit num- 
bers conned from the current Yiddish 
musical successes as presented on Sec- 
ond Ave. and the Bowery,, where Yid- 
dish theatredom thrives. 



YEGGMEN HOLD UP WATCHMAN. 

Pawtucket, R I., July 30. 

William Burke, night watchman of 
the Scenic Theatre (Keith vaudeville) 
here, was bound and gagged by. three 
masked men at the point of a gun 
early last Sunday morning and the 
yeggmen made an unsuccessful at* 
tempt to open the big safe at the the- 
atre which contained the day's re- 
ceipts of the Scenic as well as of the 
Bijou and Music Hall, two Keith pic- 
ture houses here. 

According to theatre officials there 
was a large sum of money in the safe 
at the time. Mr. Burke was thrown 
into a closet, where he remained for 
more than two hours before he was 
able to work the rope and gag loose. 

IN AND OUT. 

The Youngers, out of Riverside, 
New York, Monday— illness. Roy Har- 
rah filled in. 

Billy and Edna Frawley (Edna 
Louise) jumped in at the Majestic, 
Chicago, at the Friday matinee, re-' 
placing Harmon & McManus, who 
dropped out because of the illness of 
one of the team. 

George Price refused to accept the 
position of opening the Palace, New 
York, bill after intermission, and left 
the program Monday before the 
matinee performance. 

MARRIAGES. 

Fred M. Brown and Eleanor Roberts 
("Seven Pests"), July 26, in Chicago. " 

BIRTHS. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Lipschutz, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fanton (Fanton 
Troupe) at Chicago, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer B. Chapman, at 
their home in Buffalo, July 26, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude Golden, 
daughter. They have just returned 
from Europe. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Ryan, a,t the 
Brooklyn Hospital, daughter. The 
mother is a non-professional. The 
father is of Ryan and Healy. 



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PEEKING THROUGH THE BUSHES. 

Binghamton, July 30. 
Dear Johnny: 

This burg is go in' mad and you'll 
never guess what happened unless you 
read the local papers. You remember 
me tellin' you about "Chick" gettin* the 
gate? Well he was. told not to leave 
town as there was some thin' doin'. This 
week Sculte resigned as manager and 
"Chick" was .recalled and is now man- 
aging the club the same as last year. 
They gave him a welcome home day 
and their was 16,000 base hit worship- 
pers out at the park. 

Schulte was a great outfielder and 
knew baseball like Walter ' Kingsley 
knows telephone numbers, but he 
wasn't cut out for a leader. He could- 
n't impart his knowledge to the mob 
he had workin' for him and as a result 
he was always crabbin' and they 
wouldn't hustle like they will for our 
old paL 

: It's the same way in any line of' 
work, from show business to aviation. 
How often have you stood in back of 
the Palace on a Monday -and listened 
to all the lay offs pan n in' the acts that 
were booked solid for the next eight 
years. Guys who topped the bill at the 
"Idle Hour" and then got a week, at 
the "Sea Shell" and called it a season, 
tellin' each other what a chump aud- 
ience the Palace, was and they couldn't 
understand why the .acts were all ner- 
vous on a Monday. : 

We're in fifth place, but now that 
the "Dutchman" is the boss watch us 
dig in and climb. We brought' home 
the onion today and we're gotn' to 
stay with them and let some of these 
ball gamers know there are eight clubs 
in this league. 

A funny thing happened today durin' 
the game. We're playin' Readin' and 
they got a left hander pi tch in'. He's 
got the greatest move to first base 
I ever looked at. Half the time when 
we had a man on, the base runner, 
would be slidin' back to the bag when 
this bird was pit chin' to the batter. . One 
of our outfielders, a left-handed hitter, 
was up in the sixth innin' and had 
three balls and two strikes on him. 
There was a man on first and this 

Sitcher throws over to try and get 
im. This outfielder of burs walks 
away from the plate with a disgusted 
look on his pan. • The umps watches 
him saunter toward our bench and 
when he sees him throw his bat away, 
he calls him back and says: "What's 
the idea? You only got three and two 
on you." This gom says: 'That's all 
right,!, hit at that last one." 

I blew this broad of mine, for I finally 
got hep to myself, She's true to the 
whole league, •Txept her away from 
the gang for I figured what was the 
use of invitin' competition. The other 
night one of the Readin' gang asked 
me if I wanted to meet a couple of 
Janes who were nuts about ball players 
and actors. He said they called them 
the hit and run sisters. I figured I 
couldn't miss with my double routine, 
for if I couldn't base hit my way in, I 
could switch and tell them how I 
goaled them at the American. I joined 
him out and we drive to. a road house 
where ybu can get anyming from 
heroin to Bourbon. We breeze into 
the dinin' room 'and their sit two molls 
with their backs to us. My home 
wreckin' companion nudges me and I 
put on the prop smile and amble oyer 
to the table. 

They round and you've guessed it. 
One is my sweetie. So I'm a bachelor 
again, but a good man nevertheless. 

Run up on your vacation, 

Your old pal. 
Con. 



IDA VAN TINE— 
With the Flrat Dlvlilon 



PRODUCTION ENGAGEMENTS. 

Mildred Donnelly, "Oh My Dear." 
AL H Wilson with John Cort's 
"Glorianna." 

George McKay and Ottie Ardine . 
(McKay and Ardine) with "What's the 
Odds," a rewritten version of "Check- 
ers." 



IN PARIS. ■"•.'•'■*'■ 

By B. a. Kendrew. 

Paris, July 1JV 
Five American girls who have been 
entertaining with the A. E. F. as a 
troupe billed as the Hearons Sisters 
for' the past 17 months returned, home 
last week. The unit comprises Misses 
Anna, Charlotte and Winifred Hear- 
ons, of New York, Clara Grey and 
Eunice Pros'son. -----v— --■•-.- ---.^--.-.i^ 

As an attraction for visitors, gam- 
bling facilities have now been officially 
granted to various Casinos at differ- 
ent health and seashore resorts in 
France, subject to the law of 1907, 
which provides for a Government tax 
on the winnings. This is pending fur- 
ther legislation, but Parliament has 
excluded Enghien casino from the list 
as 'it is Considered too near. Paris. ' 3: 

The passenger service between New- 
haven (England) and Dieppe (France) 
will be resumed daily from Aug. 1, 
including Sundays. - 

Hertz and Co quel in will revive next 
season, at the Porte Saint Martin, Paul 
Bourget's 'Ti-Emigre," with Lucicn 
Guitry, who created the piece during 
his tenancy of the Renaissance Thea- 
tre a few years before the war. Mau- 
rice Lehmann, who resigned last from 
.pear. : . ; . ). /. .-.. -. • 

the Comedie Francaise, • will also ap- 
"Le Chantage," by Gustave Tery and 
Alfred Savoir, a political play, is to be 
presented at the Marigny in the 
autumn, Mile. Geniat holding the lead." 

"La Pretresse de Horydwen" is the 
title of a ballet by the dancer Cleret, 
music by Paul Ladmirault, which M. 
Rouche has accepted for the Opera. 

. "L'Epervier" by F. de Croisset will 
be played at the Theatre de Paris next 
season, for L. Volturra, by Andre 
Brule (who had reported he intended' 
taking a theatre of his own). He 
will also appear in the new play by 
Henry Bataille and a piece by Tristan 
Bernard. ."■ .'.-•-.-:, v v :•■:.■/ : 

A classical concert for the A. E. F. 
was held at the Theatre Albert' Pre- 
mier, at which Jean Nestorescu, the 
Roumanian violinist, appeared with 
Miss I Martha Baird, the American 
pianoist. .The house was packed.. 

Do you want a stage costume up to 
date ? Try, the civils' uniform. It 
would appear civilians now Have 7 IF 
uniform, for outside a so-called Eng- 
lish .tailor on the Paris boulevards 
there is a sign : "Navals, military and 
Civils Uniforms." V -■, 




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IN LONDON. 

London, July 18. 
The drop in business has penetrated 
to "Uncle Sam" and the stay of this 
play-" at the Hay market will probably 
not extend beyond August. It will be 
followed by another American play, 
"Daddies," which Frederick Harrison, 
in conjunctkn with Robert Court- 
neidge, has secured from David Be- 
lasco. The play will have an English 
cast. ____ 

Among the forthcoming productions 
of American plays over here are "The 
Depths" (known on your side as 
"Redemption"), by Gilbert Miller at 
St. James', with Henry Ainley in the 
John Barrymore role; "Three Wise 
Fools," by Andre Chariot, at the 
Comedy; "Tea fofj Three," by George 
MacLellan, at the Criterion; "No- 
bodyls Boy," by Sir Alfred Butt and 
J. L. Sacks, at the Garrick; "Trimmed 
in Scarlet," by Violet Vanbrugh, at the 
Globe; "Come Out of the Kitchen," by 
Gertrude Elliott, who has not yet 
found a theatre for it. An English play 
scheduled for immediate production is 
"The Bantam, V. C," by Harold Brig- 
house, at St. Martin's. A. H. Woods 
has the American rights to it. ► 






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VAUDEVILLE 



CABARET 



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George White was set back $10— 
representing the court costs— as a re- 
sult of his injunction suit against Gilda 
Gray, erstwhile "Scandal" shoulder 
shiver er, and now champ shimmy ist 
with the Shubert "Gaieties" attraction. 
White, through Attorneys O'Brien, 
Malevinsky & Driscoll, alleged a con- 
tract for the mean shoulder possessor's 
services — consisting mainly of con- 
vulsively shivering the aforementioned 
anatomical members— at $75 per week. 
Miss Gray's enlistment under the 
Shubert banner precipitated the suit. 
Miss Gray, however, was prepared with 
an infallible defense, which only re- 
suted in setting White back the double 
V. The defense that the contract had 
been automatically cancelled because 
of White's failure to provide her with 
an assistant as stipulated was accepted 
by Supreme Court Justice. Robert L. 
Luce as sufficient grounds to dismiss 
the complaint. Thus ends this colorful 
litigation of White vs. Gray. 

B. D. Berg offered his new revue 
"The Soice of Life" at the Winter Gar- 
den, Chicago, last week. The revue 
was staged by Raymond Midgley. The 
words and music were written by 
Joseph Burrows and Walter Hirsch. 
The show. hit the same standard usually 
reached by Berg in his cabaret acts — 
a live, snappy, not too high-brow, not 
too low-brow production, well gowned 
and well done/ The featured people 
in this revue are Isabella Jason, Fred 
Sosman, Angell Sisters, Josephine Tay- 
lor, Paul Rahn, Johnny Yule, Charles 
Bennett, Sid Lewis. 

Following the closing of the Lambs' 
famous rendezvous for folks of the 
stage, John Vogelsang last week closed 
his place on Madison street, opposite 
the La Salle hotel. The building is be- 
ing wrecked for ' construction of the 
$2,000,000 Blackhawk hotel.' With its 
passing goes Chicago's most pictur- 
esque wine cellar. The basement, of 
the restaurant, patterned after the 
wine cellars of the old times, has been 
one of the show places of the city. It 
was the scene of many historic ban- 
|| : quets. 

Ernie Young believes he has the find 

of the year in a pair of youthful hoof- 
ers and u'-elele hounds named Keegan 
and Edwards whom he dug up in the 
wilds of Chicago recently. The team 
had specialized in back yard entertain- 
; •_ ments and the resorts where saw dust 
V' on the floor is considered class until , 
Ernie found them in the Arson ia, a 
' Chi cabaret, Young will ease the team 
East by slow stages, placing them in 
. : Henderson's, Coney Island, for a show 
in a couple of weeks. 

The Melody Five, formerly with 

&;■' Perle Frank in vaudeville, are now the 

attraction at Arthur Hunter's "Ben 

Hur" at City Island. An incident that 

was not on the program occurred 'last 

\ Satuday , night when the storm tore 

.' . down all telephone and light connec- 

^ tions, the continued playing of the band 

being one of the factors in quelling 

a near -panic. 

Joe Mann, local cabaret agent, re- 
turned from Newport News, Va., this 
week. About seven weeks ago, Joe 
established a young Coney Island at 
Riverside Park, Newport News, erect- 
ing various amusement places. He 
places his total loss on that venture at 
about $3,000. 

Emile De Recat, of Chicago, put on 
a new revue, July 24, at the Edelweiss 
Gardens. It is dubbed "'Neath the 
Stars," and Harry Rose is featured. In 
the cast are Ferguson and Sanderland, 



Dennis, Sisters, Lillian Pleasant, Fran- 
cis Moore and Miss Stross. 

Weiman'i, one of Washington 
Heights' cabaret establishments, which 
was destroyed by fire about a month 
ago, has been thoroughly renovated 
and again open to the public. Cabaret 
entertainment has been eliminated on 
account of 2.75. 

A new group of entertainers are on 
at Rainbo Gardens, Chicago. Among 
them are Smith and Pullman, Three 
Rounders, Ispham Jones. 



NEW ACTS. 

Eddie Janis and Co., (five people). 

Billy Abbott and Marie Hall, singing 
and talking. (Harry Webex.) 

"What's on Your Mind?" swetch (4 
people) (Lewis & Gordon). 

Dow and Young (2 men) singing and 
talking (I. Kaufman). 

"The One' Cent Sale," girl act, (18 
people). (A. & A. Producing Co.) 

Valerie Bergere, dramatic playlet, 
"The Moth." 

Bobby Reed, comedy sketch "The 
Average Husband." 

"Very Good, Eddie," with 15 people 
and two special sets again in rehearsal. 

Garry Owen and Co., sketch (5 peo- 
ple)' (Ray Hodgdon). 

Eunice Mitchell and Charles Stone, 
two-act (Chicago). 

Donna Montran in "Bonnets," by 
Charles Smith and Abel Green. 

Nat. S. Jerome and Co., (4 people), 
"The New Generation," by Emmett 
Devoy. (Frank Evans.) 

"On the Ragged Edge," singing and 
dancing (3 people). (A. & A. Produc- 
ing Co.) j 
, Ernest M. Jacobs and Co., two men . 
and one woman in a comedy act (Ray 
Leason). 

Jack McClellan is producing a new 
girl act, entitled "Cairo." The turn will 
carry ten people, featuring Joe Phillips. 

Jack Henry has placed 30 members 
of the band of the U. S. S. Great North- 
ern under contract and will line them 
up into three iazz bands for vaudeville. 

"Devil's Ball," with four 'men and 
four women, by William B. Friedlander 
and Will Hough (Ra^ Hodgdon). "The 
Cat," with three men and one woman 
(Arthur Klein). ' "Cleopatra." with two 
men and twelve women (M. S. Ben- 
tham). Latter two also written by 
Friedlander. 



OUT OF THE SERVICE. 

Sergt. Harold Belmont, A. E. F. 
(Counts and Belmont), returned last 
week from France; ;' 

Pvt. George Carson MacDonald, A. 
E F., was tendered a. reception by his 
parents, Charles and Sadie MacDon- 
ald at the clubhouse of the Profes- 
sional Woman's League. There were 
75 nresent. 

Benny Schwab, formerly in the music 
business at 145 West 45th street, re- 
turned frrom France this week, with 
Hospital Corps No. 26 (76th TDivision). 
He has joined the staff of Joe Mann, 
cabaret agent. 

Frank A. Vardon (Vardon and Per- 
rv) was discharged from the Overseas 
Theatre League and is hurrying home 
to a seriously ill mother in Denver. 
He was 10 months in service. His 
partner is on his way back and will 
reach here in about 10 days. They 
will re-enter vaudeville. e 



SPORTS. 

The Loew-VARiBTr nine annexed 
another victory Saturday afternoon by 
defeating the strong N. V. A. team at 
Dyckman Oval, 207th street and Broad- 
way, by a score a£ 2-0. It was the. first 
defeat for the N.'v. A.'s this season by 
a theatrical nine. 

The game was featured by the sensa- 
tional fielding of Jeff Davis, who played 

left- for the winning club. He got in 
the Tris Speaker class on two occa- 
sions. Jack Conway, who played 
second for the Varibtt bunch, forgot 
to include a pair of trousers with his 
uniform, and he had to borrow a pair 
from one of the local kids. After 
putting them on with the aid of a shoe 
horn he was forced to stand erect for 
nine innings. After a clean single in 
the fourth inning he called for help. 
It was plainly evident that the so- 
called tights were beginning to raise 
on his person like a blimp in mid-ocean. 

The losing club fought hard all the 
time. The umpire was busy, as the 
women would scream on every decision 
against the N. V. A.V 

Loew-VAMETT now claims the cham- 
pionship of the theatrical line, and will 
play any nine. 

Score by innings: 

V.-Loew-O 10 1 0-2. 

N. V. A.-0 0-0. 

Batteries— Simpson and Hebblewaite, 
Brennan and Thorne. 

The N. V. A.'s will play the Universal 
Film team tomorrow (August 2) at 
Fort Lee, N. J. 

For the^ third time this season, and 
within the last six weeks, the N. V. A. 
nine defeated Ithe Lights at Freeport 
Sunday by a score of 5-4. In the ninth 
inning the Lights had the bases loaded, 
and after Paul Dempsey fouled off 
three long ones the runner on third, in 
an endeavor to steal home, was called 
out at the plate. 

Joe Melino's "Yip, Yip, Yap Hankers- 
were defeated by a team recruited 
from Proctor's. Troy, staff by a score 
of 7-6 in an eight-inning game at Troy, 
N. Y., this week. The game was called 
on account of rain. It was featured 
bv the hitting of first baseman Jim 
Francis, who got three hits for the 
Yap Hankers. Joe Melino got a homer 
with the bases full. They intend to 
challenge all the theatrical nines when 
thev again make the metropolis. 

A baseball game between the Friars 
and the N. V. A. at the annual Friars 
outing last Tuesday was won by the 
N. V. A. 11—5. The game was really 
forfeited by the Friars who quit after 
the fifth inning, figuring more sport 
elsewhere. 



"PEEK A BOO" CLOSES AUG ». 

"Peek a Boo" will close at the Co- 
lumbia Saturday, August 9, after play- 
ing there 12 weeks. During its run it 
took in a gross of close to $100,000, a 
little over $8,000 a week, the greatest 
gross ever played to at $1 top. 



ILL AND INJURED. 

Halsey Mohr is wearing his right arm 
in a sling, and attributes it to in- 
flamatory rheumatism. 

Billy Inman confined to his home in 
Brooklyn for the last three weeks with 
a severe atack of inflammatory rheu- 
matism. 

Al Gray, general manager for D. W. 
Griffith, out of the hospital after a 
two wekes session, following a badly 
lacerated arm, caused by the breaking 
of the windshield on his automobile. 

Belle Baker, showing no improve- 
ment from a slight attack of stomach 
trouble, intends to remain at Schroon 
Lake, N. Y., for several weeks longer, 
having canceled all immediate book- 
ings. 

The following are reported at the 
American Theatrical Hospital, Chi- 
cago: Mabel Ranous ("My Soldier 
Girl" company); Mme. Burnell ("Cur- 
rent of Fun") and Alberta Fritchie 
(formerly of the Fritchie Comedy Com- 
pany). 

IP YOU DON'T ADVERTISE IN VARIETY — 
DONT ADVERTISE 



OPERA CORYPHEES MAY STRIKE. 
Chicago, July 30. 

Old Sig. Campanini is gonna hav# 
trouble this season. There may be a 
strike of the opera chorus gells. The 
men in the grand opera chorus get $3 
a week more than the gells do. Some 
of the high .spirited ladies of the 
chorus couldn't stand for Jhat. 

Frint George Out of Firm. 

Chicago, July 30. 
Lester Bryant has purchased the in- 
terest of Frint George in the produc- 
ing firm of George & Bryant. George 
will resume his connection as road 
manager of the Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association. 



AMONG THE MUSIC MEN. 

Tom Penfold Is with the professional staff 
of the Remlck New York office. ; 

Jack Neal of the Joe Morris professional 
staff will Join the "Three Chums" act 

Bert Lowe, formerly with a two-act Is 
pounding the ivories in the Harry Von Tllzer 
professional department at present 

Jack Carroll, last with McCarthy & Fisher, 
is heading a band at North White Lake for 
the summer. : v~~-~" 



Remlck's has secured the song rights to the 
Universal feature, "The Right to Happiness," 
and Paramount's, "The Dark Star." 

Louis Bernstein (Shapiro. Bernstein's) re- 
turned from his vacation last Monday. He 
was up in Maine. 

Ernest A. Lambert, late director of enter- 
tainments at one of the local W. O. C. S. 
branches, has Joined the professional staff of 
the McKInley Music Co. 

Barney I Hagan, formerly assistant profes- 
sional manager of the Wltmarks' San Fran- 
cisco office, has been given charge of their 
new Seattle branch. 

George Bennett and Fred Bernard, of the 
Stern writing and professional staffs respec- 
tively, left tor Atlantic City, this week, in 
' the Interests of their firm. 

Jos. W. Stern's new Boston office is in 
charge of Charles Lang with Billy Morsn 
managing the professional staff. He is as- 
sisted by Sam Wallace and Eben Litchfield 
on the professional end. 

Henry Santley, discharged from the Army 
this week, after 15 months across the pond 
with the 51st Pioneers, has returned to his 
former position with Waterson Berlin 6 
Snyder. 

Harry D. Squires, Joe Morris' Pittsburg 
ballad writer, is now located at Morris' new 
Atlantic City music shop, on Garden Pier, 
where he is popularizing his Arm's numbers, 
including several of his own. 

Jerome H. Remlck & Co. through their at- ' 
torney, Abner Greneberg. are legally com- 
bating a number of the smaller houses who 
have put out song publications, alleged to be 
infringements on their "Sahara," the Winter 
Garden hit 



Ed. O'Keefe, formerly a member of the 
Broadway Music Corporation professional 
staff, has been discharged from the service, 
having served 14 months with 77th Division in 
France. O'Keefe is now connected with the 
Joe Morris Music Co. as a professional man. 

Max Prtval's "8omebody Misses Somebody's 
Kisses," as rendered by Lew Kennedy at 
Loew's Pittsburgh Theatre, last week, won a 
silver loving cup and price for the A. J. 
Stasney Music Co., as winners -of the song 
contest conducted there. 

The Wltmarks have placed George Rldge- 
well, the musical comedy writer, under a long 
term contract, whereby they will exploit all 
his numbers in the future. Mr. Rldgewell 
is th e author of a current popular London 
revne. 

Bob Russak, last professional manager with 
Gilbert ft Frledland, will enter the music 
publishing business for himself next month. 
He Is at present negotiating for a location 
on West • 45th street. With him. Beymour 
Furth will be affiliated as writer and pro- 
fessional man. 

By a mutual agreement Grante Clarke and 
James V. Monaco, who signed their exclusive 
song writing services with McCarthy & Fisher 
for a year, recently, have severed their con- 
nections with the house. The duo have placed 
their first free-lance song writing effort with 
Jerome H. Remlck. It's called "Remember 
You Can Always Have Me." 



With the announcement that David Belasco's 
"Daddies" will be produced In London next 
season, B. Feldman, the British music pub- 
lisher, cabled to, and completed contracts 
with, Charles K. Harris, publisher of the song, 
"Daddies," which is written around the play. 
Feldman Is planning a big "plug" for the 
number in England In conjunction with the 
comedy. 



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WHO'S WHO-AND WHY 



' IN VAUDEVILLE 

By JOHNNIE O'CONNOR {Wynn). 
{To be continued as a series, with one Who's Who article weekly. Name of 
writer supplied upon request— this one by Johnnie O'Connor (Wynn),:L 




OVER THE BUMPS 



ZJCil 



' 1 



IRVING BERLIN. 

This egg, now numbered among the 
greatest of lyric and music composers 
in our midst or in the past, was born 
. somewhere in Russia in 1888. He 
doesn't know the exact spot because 
they move the map of Russia around 
frequently, and what's more he doesn't 
care a. rap, for in Russia -they wouldn't 
understand his melodies anyhow. And 
besides he can's speak Russian, but 
don't try any wise crack in' lingo on 
him for he knows them all. 
\ When he migrated here in his early 
youth, the most lucrative profession 
on the east side was peddling papers. 
"Issie" started in that racket down on - 
Chambers street and Broadway. He 
had one of those crying voices and 
could sell more than the other kids, 
so he cultivated the "pipes" holler in' 
'T£xtra" until we next find him up in 

J'immie Kelly's gin mill crooning bal- 
ads. That was in the good old days 
' when Kelly's was the real joint on the 
east side and mugs like the late "Big" 

• Tim and others' of Tammany fame used 
to fall in the dump to throw half dol- 
lar pieces at the cuckoos. 

But Irving was ambitious. When a 
song scored a hit he'd sneak into the 

* bar and try and write a parody on it. 
And one day Max Winslow (the great 
unshaven) fell into Kelly's plugging 
songs for Harry Von Tilzer. He recog- 
nized Ir ving's possibilities and now 
he's his. partner in business. He tried 
to procure a job at Von Tiber's for 
the kid,' but Harry was writing his own 
stuff exclusively and couldn't see any 
newcomer, even at the $15 weekly 
wage Irving was willing and anxious 
to break into the music racket for. 

Finally Irving wrote a song instead 
of a parody. It was called "Queenie." 
Al Piantadosi wrote the music and 
Harry Jones the "vamp." They landed 
$25 for the number splitting it three 
ways with, the vamp writer on the 
short end. Carl Laemelle, then in the 
music business, published it. It flopped. 

The great unshaven Max still had 
,; faith in his "find," and when Irving 
wrote "Someone's Waiting for Me," 
Max peddled it to Harry Von Tilzer 
for $250, then considered a high price 
for any number. 

It didn't take long for Irving to 
work up and Max crawled up with 
him. They were pals then and they 
are pals and partners now. When 
Henry Watersoh sold out his > jewelry 
business and went in the music racket 
with Ed Rose and Ted Snyder, Irving 
Berlin and Max Winslow sneaked in 
with them. living's path to fame was 
short and sweet He banged out one 
hit after another and taught the music 
world just how much the public liked 
ragtime. When his "Alexander's Rag- 
time Band" hit the market a wallop 
the competitive publishers began to 
look around feverishly for ragtime 
writers. The idea of a "rag" song 
breaking selling records seemed pre- 
posterous to them before, but now a 
music, catalogue without a rag is a 
laugh, and Irving Berlin paved the 
way for them. 

Many people think "Alexander" 
holds the Berlin selling record. It 
doesn't. His best seller was "Michi- 
gan," also published by Waterson, Ber- 
lin and Snyder. And his "When I Lost 
You" makes most of the modern bal- 
lads look like the wail of an amateur. 

Berlin has some funny characteris- 
tics. He does his best work under 
pressure. Just recently when he knew 
his new firm needed a catalogue he 
hopped down to Atlantic City and in 
those three days turned out the six 
songs__the_nrm is now startin g with. 



And the same goes for the several 
musical shows he has provided with a 
score. Always under pressure. 

Irving is also an art lover on the 
quiet. He sneaks around art sales and 
gobbles up old art treasures as long 
as the ready bank-roll averts con- 
sumption. His home is full of old mas- 
terpieces in ..painting, old gems : in,, 
literature and curios of ancient origin. 

And with his youth and popularity 
'Irving Berlin never passed up a friend. 
The so-called, "swell-head" never af- 
fected him. He can feel at home in a 
Fifth avenue mansion or ah east side 
tenement. And he's not a piker. 
When he gambles he plays the high 
stakes, and when he gives he goes the 
limit. • J-i \ 

Now Irving, after several years of. 
success. as a writer is going into the 
business end with his discoverer, Max 
Winslow, carrying with him a host 
of friends, the kindof friends who 
would crawl through hell for one they 
like. They've found Irving a regular, 
like his make-up and so does every- 
one else who knows him personally. 

A little nervous, always > on the^ go, 
but never forgetful. Russia has given 
America much in a musical way, but 
few Berlins. What a regular kid he 
is.! None more regular, no siree! 

WAR CORRESPONDENT LECTURING 

London, July 30. 

Lowell Thomas, the American war 
correspondent, will open at Covent 
Garden, Aug. 14, in a series of illus- 
trated lectures. I 

The tour will be under the direction 
of Percy Burton. 

Brown Secure* Release. 

- Chamberlain Brown managed to se- 
cure the release of Harry K. Morton 
and Zella Russell from Jacobs and Ter- 
mon. Morton and Miss Russell were 
under contract to the burlesque mana- 
gers for a number of years. 

Brown placed . the comedian with 
"The Greenwich Village . Follies." 
Early this week, the comedian stated 
that he was going to tender his no- 
tice to the Greenwich Village people 
and leave the show. 

The arrangement that Brown made 
with Jacobs and Jermon for Morton 
and Russell includes an appearance 
for eight weeks under the Jacobs and 
Jermon management after which they 
will be free for other productions un- 
der the direction of Brown. 

Harry Delf is to succeed Morton 
when the latter leaves the Greenwich 
show to fulfill his eight weeks with the 
burlesque managers. 



Equal Pay for Equal Work. 

Fifty of the gells have organized and 
registered a kick with the manage- 
ment. They also called on the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, with which 
their own union "Federal No. 30" 
claims to 'be affiliated. 

Joseph C. Engel, stage manager for 
the Auditorium, says a compromise 
had been effected, and exhibited a 
contract signed with the girls. He 
declared the president of the chorus 

?ersons union, Irving Lavitz of New 
r ork, had agreed to the proposition 
of paying the girls less than the men. 

Acts or Burlesque at Francau. 

Montreal, July 30. 
Harold Havia, who has the stock 
company at the Orpheum, will secure 
the lease of the Francias. Mr. Havia 
says unless he can secure Keith popu- 
lar price vaudeville to play at the Fran- 
cais, he will place burlesque in the 
house. 



♦ Some grandfathers o' today weren't . 
born when certain female dramatic 
stars were already grandmothers, an 
still we hear th' cry that gittin' in the 
fillums, if you're a stage hit, is difficult 
unless yo' gotta pull or a Jawn. 

Buy in' up all the film houses in th' 
country and dump in' 'em in a single 
pool so's to be able to jack the box 
office take up to where the public, can't 
eat is business acumen, accordin' to 
-some screen philanthropists, sez Ike 
Strohsky. Ike sez deys been $200,000,- 
^000 inpapermoney passed between the 
maggots in.th' last three mos. for. t'ee- ' 
aters alone, but that all he kin find 
charged for the stories that makes th' 
plays that makes th' audiences is $8,- 
724.35, the 35 bein' for one o' the last 
"smashin' big punch" per-lots. 

Ike sez get tin', up. at six to git to Ft. 
Lee at eight, to be told to kum back 
in January when you on'y wuz goin' 
to git $2.50 out o* the $3.50 the direc- 
tors ticket dey would give you for two 
.deys' -work and free nights worry, 
Shows even a blind guy that it's better 
to have your .brains in your lead pen- 
cil than in your alarm clock. 

Spuds Reilly sez you kin git all th' 
"Follies" tickets you want at the box 
office Agger's if you've gotta jane in 
the show that's gotta Reginald who 
b'longs to sum o' of the swell clubs 
who -on 'y has to telephone from, say, 
the Skiltmore or any other big noise 
shack whose jokes summered last win- 
ter down where the Palm Beach pants ■ 
■ grow. •; . ■■'''. 

Scarcity o' putty gal material for 
musical comedy an' burlesque choruses! 
The war taught a lot o' them that they 
could pull down $35 per as passers b" 
the buck, and beef -and, an' get smiled 
at all the time. Instead o' havin' to 
lis'n to th' "You blame boob, ain't you 
got no control over your legs?" 
prayers that stage producers hand out 

When they wheeled a tea and bon 
bon table down the .aisles of a certain 
42d street theatre t'other night in a 
shot o' the press agent to show his 
manager he was busy, try in' to git 
somethin' on the front page about how 
certain managers wuz handlin' the de- 
cadence of the 'tween-the-acts because 
booze habit, a coke in one o' th' seats 
shot but his addict card. 

Producin' managers are askin' Con- 
gress to git after the one-night stand 
managers who won't open up their 
satiddy nights at 20/80 coz the 6. n. 
s. m.'s instead o' the p. m.'s gits th' 
80, an' the 20 besides with the Aim 
flams, without havin' to bother about 
no shows. 

An actor in a certain show who got 
his salary boosted because o' the hands 
he got every time he kem out and got 
off got fired last week when his man- 
agers discovered a card in the program 
that the actor had had inserted at so 
much a line sayin' as how he wuz glad 
onct more to be back in his own home 
town, an' hopin' everyone in front that 
he hadn't writ to while he wuz away 
would appreciate that a sojer's life is 
pretty busy when the gatts are gattin'r 

Hearst macin' N. Y.'s managers out 
o\ 90c per line for ad. space in his 
Sunday American has got the other 
publishers who are on'y gettin' 50, 60 
and75 wonderin' why the dif. between 
havin' certified circulations and just 
me\e smart advertisin' hypnotists, 
while the managers who are just mere- 
ly payin' the bills are wonderin', after 
all, with some of the shows they're 
runnin' if it wouldn't be just good 



common sense to stick their show ads' 
in the obit columns where the rate is 
on'y 40 flat even in the Am. &J. ■ ^ 

Who said the drama ain't pro- 
gressing Of 17 separate and distinct 
salients in the dramatic and visual sub- 
stance of five new plays produced in 
Manhattan within the past month, the 
local critics agreed unanimously to 
disagree about everythin*. ,;' 

What's wrong with the movies? 
Shakespeare probably could tell if he 
came back. Also, David Belasco, 
George BrOadhurst, George Bronson 
Howard, Eugene Walter, Willard 
Mack, and others. And, also, besides, 
lots of exhibs. who have to take ear- 
fuls f'm their audiences year in an' 
out. But, who's go in' to pay any at- 
tention to dem guys? > 

The savants diggin' oodles o' years 
for the secret o' puttin' life in dead 
ones kin stop worryin'. Let 'em go 
to the current melodramas along 
B'way.- In one 6' the present big hits 
they'll see two dead ones come to life 
after the first act for the curtain ap- 
plause, an' in one o' them, see a guy 
bo win' an' smirkin' in front o' the 
foots two years after he's been in- 
terred. 

McPherson & Wads worth, who 
started out last week on a gran' vodvill 
tour o' th' inland water towns, haz 
canceled the tour and iz comin* back 
with web feet. 



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ANNOUNCEMENT WITHOUT NAMES. 

The National Burlesque Association 
is again exhibiting signs of coming to 
life and announces that they will be 
ready to open Sept. 1 with 25 weeks, 
the houses (names of theatres not 
given) located as follows :., Two houses 
in Philadelphia, two houses in Chicago, 
one house in each of the following 
cities: Boston, Montreal, Troy, Schen- 
ectady, Rochester, Buffalo, Cleveland, 
Detroit Milwaukee, St. Louis, Cincin- 
nati, Columbus, Pittsburgh and Balti- 
more. The other five weeks will be 
made up of one, two and three highters. 

John Hj/Walsh is president; Joseph 
Howard, vice-president; Charles E> 
Barton, secretary and general man- 
ager ; William E, Mooser, treasurer ; 
Albert H. Ladner, Jr., counsel; John W. 
Ford, chairman of the executive com- 
mittee; which includes Edward C. 
Schmidheiser, Albert Bartz, William 
Heim and John H. Dugan. 

It is a Delaware corporation and In- 
corporated for $100,000. The circuit 
officials are chary about giving out for 
publication the names of theatres and 
franchise holders. It was learned from 
unofficial sources that several ex- 
American Wheel franchise holders are 
numbered among the National's pros- 
pects. 



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American After Tulsa (Okla.) House. 

The American wheel is negotiating 
for a housi in Tulsa, Oklahoma, which, 
if secured, will be used to fill in the 
lay-off week heretofore sandwiched in 
between Kansas City and St. Louis. 

Providing the deal for the Tulsa 
house goes over, the American shows 
will play the stand following Kansas 
City, opening on Mondays and closing 
on Fridays^ in order to make the jump 
to St. Louis. ' , 



FROM DRAMA TO BURLESQUE. 

Harold Kennedy, last with the 
Spooner and Blaney dramatic stock at 
the Yorkville, New York, has signed 
for a comedy role with the "Girls a La 
Carte" attraction. 



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VARIETY 



DINNER TO MARTIN S. OWENS 
PROVES GREAT WELCOME HOME 



Gallant Police Officer Guest of Honor at Affair Arranged by 

Fred McCIoy, Manager of Columbia Theatre. French 

High Commissioner, City Officials and 

Others Present. Diamond Pin Given -*• 

Hero. Entertainers There. 



One of the greatest social events of 
the decade from the standpoint of 
municipal importance- was supervised 
successfully last Wednesday night at 
the Palais Royal Restaurant by Fred 
McCIoy, manager of the Columbia the- 
atre, New York, when he staged the 
dinner for the police department of 
New York welcoming home Capt. 
Martin S. Owens, who went abroad 
as the official representative of the 
department in the European war to 
drive the ambulance donated by the 
Honor Legion of the force. Owens 
returned with honors from every al- 
lied nation for the valiant work done 
in line of duty. 

McCIoy has been working on. the 
dinner for several months. He is one 
of Owens' closest friends and the de- 
partment, recognizing his prowess in 




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Captain Martin S. Owen*. 

matters of this kind, delegated him to 
handle the whole affair. McCIoy first 
began the grand welcome by sending 
two boats down the bay to meet the 
transport bearing Capt. Owens home, 
the boats carrying members of the de- 
partment and personal friends of the 
hero of the force. 

Dignitaries of every branch of the 
municipal departments, including His 
Excellency Maurice Cazanava, High 
Peace Commissioner of France to the 
United States, were seated around the 
banquet dais to welcome Owens back 
to his native city. Police Commis- 
sioner Enright, John H. McCooey, 
democratic chairman of Kings County, 
and many judges, police inspectors and 
others of importance in the municipal 
service, were among the speakers who 
voiced their praise of Owens' behavior 
while abroad, but McCIoy struck the 
keynote of the gathering when he said, 
"For your two years of exceptional 
service to the department and to hu- 
manity itself we wish you that full 
measure of reward you so abundantly 
deserve." At the conclusion of his 
speech McCIoy presented Owens with 



a handsome diamond tie-pin as a token 
of appreciation from his friends. 

Owens w*r practically nominated as 
sheriff of Kings County by Bab Hall, 
one of the entertainers who took part 
in the gathering. Hall scored a terrific 
hit with his impromptu type of verse. 
Others who entertained were Frisco 
and Loretta McDermott, Skipper and 
Ashley, Totp and Olga Cook, the latter 
a daughter of a police captain. Miss 
Cook brought the gathering to tears 
when, with her ' arms around Capt. 
Owens, she sang "Laddie Boy" to Gus 
Edwards' accompaniment. 

It was a triumph for burlesque with) 
Mr. McCIoy in the chairman's role, for 
of all the active heads of theatricals 
McCloywas the best suited man for 
the position, with < his large acquaint- 
ance among the members of the va- 
rious municipal departments. Among 
other things said of Owens by the 
burlesque manager were: 

This gathering of personal friends, 
tble unofficial rejoicing " assemblage, 
hearty, sincere, and without ulterior 
motives, as It assuredly Is, Is but a 
meagre contribution to the gratitude that 
. has been ao richly earned by our hero 
and honored guest. | 

If any soldier deserves well of his 
country ; If any soldier merits the rec- 
ognition that finds expression In sub- 
stantial material advancement, I respect- 
fully submit Captain Martin S. Owens can 
not he overlooked, when his record at the 
Front 8b all come before the constituted 
authorities of this city. (Applause.) 

For your two years of exceptional ser- 
vice in the Department, and to humanity 
Itself, we wish you that full measure of 
reward you so abundantly deserve. 

We want you to take from this banquet 
hall tonight not only memories of good 
fellowship, sincerely and honestly ex- 
pressed, but as well this token of our 
unbounded admiration and high esteem 
(presenting Captain Owens with a dia- 
mond stick-pin). , 

May I ask every person present to an- 
swer my question — Has he upheld the 
reputation of the Police Department of 
New York? (Cries of "Tou bet be has." 
and great applause.) 

There were two days during that 
horrible carnage over there when every 
man of .the Police Department of this 
city, from the Commissioner down to Its 
lowest member, must have felt his pulse 
quicken ; must have felt an unusual pride 
In his membership in that body; must 
\ have felt In his soul, without being able 
' to account for it, that something, some- 
where, had happened, of which he was In- 
timately a part. Mr. Toastmaster, they 
were two days in which the Police De- 
partment of this city received the homage 
of the civilized world, at the hands of 
two of the world's greatest and moBt il- 
lustrious leaders. Owens was there- 
Owens was always there when the voice of 
duty summoned him to stand up and take 
what was coming to him. 

On the first of those two memorable 
days, our New York policeman, working 
in such a way u s to uphold the reputa- 
tion of the department, and with the rag- 
ing Hell of battle shrieking in his ears, 
was approached by a courier, who thrust 
a paper In his hand with the brief ex- 
clamation, "From the Commander-in- 
Chief." 

Mr. Toastmaster, that communication 
was signed by General John J Pershing, 
and was sent to the Police Department of 
the City of New York, through its des- 
ignated representative at the Front — 
Policeman Martin S, Owens. (Great ap- 
plause.) 

Mr, Toastmaster, when the great Gen- 
era) pinned that Cross upon the breast of 
Martin S. Owens, he pinned it upon the 
breast of every member of the Police De- 
partment of this city. 



AJ Green Leaving Detroit. 

Chicago, July 30. 
Al Green, orchestra leader at the 
Temple, Detroir, will leave Detroit for 
New York. 

Green has been at the Temple for 
many years. 



DIPLOMAS FOR CRITICS; 

On the strrnes of the Starkeye Press 
of Philadelphia, and fast assembling 
for paging and booking are the ad- 
vance sheets of just what a certain 
John Keats of the Penn state thinks 
of the theatre critics of America. . 

John wants a government dramatic 
institute, where only diplomaed grad- 
uates will be permitted to pass judg- 
ment upon the plays offered for pub- 
lic consumption. The critic of the 
critics says everything theatrically 
critical in America at present is all 
wrong. John doesri't like the ^things 
done here in the name of stage criti- 
cism nor the way they're done nor-the 
men who do them. He concedes that 
William Winter approximated some- 
thing of the quality demanded in one 
who is jto be the guide, counselor and 
friend oF" the men who would inter- 
pret the muses of the theatre. But he 
says that Winter was prejudiced, and 
that the late reviewer for the\ New 
York Tribune was wholly wrong in his 
strenuous advocacy of the Shakes- 
pearean extension. Jawn concedes 
that the late Charles Frohman did 
more for the American drama than a 
thousand critics could do or undo in 
the encouragement the manager gave 
to writer's through the moneys he dis- 
bursed in advance royalties. The in- 
fluence of Sardou. Dumas, Balsac, 
Murger Du Maupassant, Daudet, Feul- 
let, and Du Maupassant's model, the 
author of* "Madame Bo vary," Jawn 
thinks worked wonders in stimulating 
the dramatic impulse of this country, 
and the author traces those influences 
to certain plays produced by Ameri- 
can writers, inspired, Jawn thinks, by. 
their French forerunners. 

Of German fossils, John exhumes 
Lessing and his fables, Kant and his 
critiques, Claudius and "Sorrows of 
Young Werther," Lavater and his "In- 
fluence of the Imagination," Von 
Goethe and his "Confessions of a Fair 
Saint," and other works, and Von 
Schelling and his "Plastic Arts of Na- 
ture to show how much the pioneer 
impressionists affected the later Ger- 
man drama, which in turn affected 
America through the German plays 
adapted here by wholesale after Au- 
gustin Daly introduced the practice. 

The author of the criticism of critics 
has some nice words and phrases in 
his paragraphs making up a total of 
358 pages, ard is exhaustively and im- 
pertinently personal in tying tags to 
many of the theatre's reviewers that 
he arraigns. 

For years the writer has observed 
the field of criticism in this country, 
has compiled the published opinions 
of paid writers of stage plays in more 
than 2,500 American cities. Some of 
the best critics he found, he says, in 
small places, where the comparative 
absence of economic pressure helped 
a reviewer to clearer thought of the 
real meanings of life, as reflected by 
the Greatest Dramatist, the Creator 
and Reviewer of all and everything. 

John thinks New York critics the 
most worse, "a motley of hybrids," he 
styles 'em. Chicago vivisectionists of 
the drama he calls "intellectual popin- 
jays, for the most part, who air both 
their ignorance and their vanities 
singly en occasional week days, and 
offend doubly on Sunday, with their 
misdemeanors mainly blocked para- 
graphs of verbal periphery void of 
sense or real information for the 
player or the public, their several 
vanities as clearly indicated in their 
several facets of manner as the oxi- 
dized ornature on a peacock's tail." 

New York's critics he classifies "for 
the most part licensed brawlers of 
coarse speech and purblind vision." 

Jawn professes to have dug into the 
early personal histories of the critics 
of N. Y, Phila., Chi., San F., Boston 
and other cities, and states that what 
he writes is deliberate judgment. 
"Provincial" is his designation for the 
point- of view of the average American 
critic of the theatre of America of 
today. 

The author points to what he defines 



SHEA'S NEW $1,500,000 HOUSE. 
Buffalo, N. Y.,^uly 30. 

The Shea Amusement Company has 
purchased the. Root property at 622 to 
634 Main street, running through the 
entire block to Pearl street, where they 
will erect what will be one of the 
finest amuse/nent buildings in the 
country, at a cost of upwards ' of 
-$1,500,000. 

On this plot having a Main street 
frontage of 133 feet and a depth of 
232 feet, a theatre and roof garden 
will be built. It will be known as 
Shea's Metropolitan Theatre and Roof. 
The theatre will seat over 3,500 per- 
sons, while the roof theatre will 'ac- 
commodate about 2,000 people. This 
will make a total seating capacity of 
both new theatres of over_ 5,500. per- 
sons. Both theatres will be completely 
equipped. 

The theatre building itself will be 
erected in the rear of the two-story 
building now fronting on Main street. 
This building will be modernized and 
the lobby will be placed directly in 
the center of that block, flanked on 
both sides with three modern stores. 
The lobby will be 28 feet by 80 feet 

The active direction of the theatre 
will be under the management of Har- 
old B. Franklin, who will operate the 
theatre in conjunction with Shea's. 
Hippodrome. • 

The new theatre will be devoted to 
the presentation of photoplays, to- 
gether with a symphony orchestra, so- 
loists>and novelties. When the new* 
house opens Shea's Hippodrome will 
play high grade vaudeville, together 
with motion pictures. Shea's Court 
Street Theatre will continue the policy m 
of showing Keith vaudeville. Other 
theatres owned by the Shea interests 
in the city are the Majestic Theatre, 
and the Gaiety Theatre. Mr. Shea is 
also interested in theatres in Toronto 
and other cities. 

BURLESQUE ENGAGEMENTS. 

Jim Franck, advance agent of the 
Edmond Hayes show. 

May Belle, for "French Babies." 

Ted Symond, erstwhile owner of the 
late defunct "Auto Girls," will manage 
Blutch Cooper's new "Victory Belles 
show. 

For Bob Deady's new "Girls, Girls, 
Girls" show: Snitz Moore, Billy 
Welch, Betty Palmer, Myrtle Cherry, 
Anne Burke, Bill Lawrence. 

Charles Quinn and Josie Qutnne, for 
Sam Howe's Big Show. 

Charts Fagan, "Girls A La Carte. 

George Douglas, "Bon Tons." 

Elvia Bates, by Jacobs & Jermon, to 
Teplace Zella Russel in "The Bur- 
lesque Review" in October. 

BETTER SECOND WHEEL SHOWS. 

Patrons of American wheel bur- 
lesque houses are in for some really 
worth while attractions judging from 
the rosters and stars of several of the 
new productions. 

George Stone. and Etta Pillard, as 
heads of their own company, operated 
under a franchise granted Sam Levey, 
are certain of raising the standard of 
the second wheel attractions. Like- 
wise Sliding Billy Watson's show,. the 
Edmond Hayes burlesque and the new 
"Girls, Girls, Girls" attraction contain 
worthy artists in their casts that as- 
sure a full evening's excellent enter- 
tainment 

as the "yanked-up" education of the 
writers he excoriates, gives many in- 
stances of graduation from callings 
foreign to any form of art to the. dra- 
matic chair, bawls out the venality of 
publishers who allow their critical de- 
partments to be influenced by theat- 
rical advertising, and finishes up with 
a fine blast in which he thinks that 
the absence of harmony in the ali- 
mentary canal, senility and the per- 
verse human trait that makes a born 
railroad man want to be an actor — he 
cites Thomas A. Edison's attempts to 
go on the stage — responsible for the 
unfit that get into the dramatic critics' 
berths. ■ ■ 



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VARIETY 



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KIETY 



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VoLLV. 



No. 10 



John Lamps, manager of Proctor's 
Mt. Vernon, has not resigned his posi- 
tion as stated last week. 

. • 

Helen Shipman has been engaged by 
Charles Dillingham to succeed Anna 
Orr in "She's a- Good Fellow." 

Josephine Davis has canceled the 
Pantages time to be with her mother 
in Brooklyn, /who is seriously ilL 

Joe Gfack will manage "Oh Look" 
with the Dolly Sisters the coming sea- 
son. " '■■ 

George M. Cohan is re-writing Aaron 
Hoffman's "Welcome Stranger" before 
the C. & H. firm brings the piece to 
town. , ", 

Ilka Marie Deel has been engaged, 
by Rosalie Stewart, for the principal 
part in "On the Yellow Sea." The part 
was first played by Fania Marionoff. 

C. B, Maddock has postponed his 
trip to Europe. He is at present put- 
ting on the Andrew Tombes show, 
"Nothing But Love." 

Ann, Brenner is representing Lew 
Golder's office, on the 5th and 6th 
floor of the U. B. O., while Golder is 
on his vacation. 

Charles Bradley, formerly in vaude- 
ville and more latterly with the J. H. 
Remick & Co. Boston branch, is at the 
State Sanitarium, Rutland, Mass., for 
his health. 

The Princess, Nashville, will close 
Aug. 9, reopening Sept. 2,, resuming 
with vaudeville. Meantime the house 
will have its seating capacity increased 
400. 

Edna Bates, engaged to play the title 
role in "The Only Girl" with the Gar- 
rick Stock, Washington, D. C, was 
compelled to leave the cast due to the 
sudden death of her mother. 

John Lovorago, formerly manager of 
the Alhambra, N. Y., and recently in 
charge of the Greenpoint, over the 
summer months, has been appointed 
manager of the Strand, Brooklyn. 

The epidemic of automobile thieves 
among theatrical agents continues. 

James Plunkett lost his Ford-Sedan 
londay, valued at $1,500. It was in- 
sured. 

Linton St Lamar added the Opera 
House, Beacon, N. Y., to their list this 
week;- playing four acts and pictures 
on a weekly split with the Casino, Jer- 
sey City. 

It was reported recently that Henry 
Bellit would revive "Poor Old Jim" for 
vaudeville next season. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter O. Hill are now appearing in 
William C. DeMille's playlet, and have 
an option on it for the next two years. 

Ralph Riggs and Katheryn Witchie, 
after 11 months with various revues 
and musical comedy shows in England, 
returned to this country this week. 
The combination will open their vaude- 
ville tour in Baltimore, August 18. 

i Tha apartment of Harry Norwood 



(Norwood and Hall) was burglarized 
on July 25. The loot, valued at $500, 
included his wife's furs and various 
articles of clothing. He lives at 149 
West 46th street. 

Blanche and Ina Kuhn, wives of two 
members of the Three White Kuhns 
specialty, returned from overseas last 
week, where they were entertaining 
the American troops. They will offer 
a double turn in vaudeville. 

Aboud & Lawand, of the King 
Edward Theatre, Montreal, have ; 
decided to place vaudeville in the 
house, succeeding stock. The Plimmer 
agency will handle the booking of 
three acts semi-weekly commencing 
Aug. 25. % j 

Gertrude Hoffman was given a little 
publicity last week through the alleged 
announcement of her husband that she 
had mysteriously disappeared. During 
her reported absence Miss Hoffman 
was around Broadway as usual without 
any mystery attaching. 

Sonny Barkas, the theatrical mana- 
ger, sailed on the Aquitania last Sat- 
urday for London, carrying with him 
contracts to represent a number of 
American artists seeking British en- 
gagements. Among his clients are 
Frank Tinney, McKay nad Ardine and 
the Leighton Bros. 

Homer Near, manager of Gus Sun's 
tab department, and Hal Hoyt, Billy 
Wachtel and Ed Paul, connected with 
the Sun offices in Springfield, arrived 
in New York Saturday to dig up new 
material for next season. Ray Leason 
is chaperoning his former teammates 
while in the big town. 

Tom Coyno's Clinton Theatre, at 
Soldier's town, Camp Mills, Hampstead, 
L. I., was struck by a wind storm, 
July 28, which tore the ; roof off the 
house and blew it a mile away. All the 
electric light poles and feed wires 
were destroyed. Performance was 
given in daylight. 

The Actors and Songwriters will hold 
a field day at Wallace's Ridge wood , 
Park, Sunday, August 24, the principal 
event of the day being a baseball game. 
Gus Van and Joe Schenck will . con- 
stitute the battery for the actors, while 
Harry Carroll will officiate on the slab 
for the songwriters. \ 

W. Carey Wonderly, author of "The 
World to Live In," has been in town 
placing his new play. He has been 
on the stage himself and various ex- 
perts are predicting a career for him 
as a dramatist. He has now gone back 
to Greenwood Lake to complete his 
vacation. 

Tom SmitbVfour-year-old son enjoys 
the distinction of being the youngest 
passenger ever carried in an aeroplane. 
At Freeport Sunday Tom and the 
youngster went up with Sperry, the 
aviator, who has been carrying pas- 
sengers at a dollar a minute. Tom s 
kid threatens to bankrupt the family. 
After they had descended the young- 
ster did not want to leave the plane. 

Paragon Park, the biggest summer 
resort near Boston, got considerable 
advertising on Monday following an 
accident to one of the aviators who 
make daily exhibitions at, the park. 
Lieut. Wesley L. Smith f/C 1,000 feet 
into the surf during one' e stunts, 
a mimic battle in the air, his es- 

cape from death is considt most 
remarkable. Another plane 1—s been 
secured and the stunts are on again. 
Lieut. Smith escaped with minor in- 
juries. 

The tornado which hit Long Island 
Monday afternoon ripped off the roof 
of the Clinton Theatre Soldier-town 
Hempstead, where Tom Coyne has 



been playing stock burlesque for' the 
last six months. Coyne managed to 
give a show Monday night, however, 
by turning the house into an improm- 
ptu air dome and starting the show at 
six o'clock, the early hour being ne- 
cessitated by the lighting system of 
the town having been put out of com-* 
mission by the storm. 



Nellie Lynch (Western and Lynch) 
who recently arrived in this country 
from abroad, where they have been- for 
the last seven years, asserts that 
"O'Donnell and Kibbs, have appropri- 
ated a part of the act which Miss 
Lynch and her partner originated 12 
years ago, and have been using ever 
since. The portion referred to is at. 
the end and is a reference to "shoot- 
ing the cat." Miss Lynch is Over here 
looking for a partner, as her husband, 
an Englishman, formerly appearing 
with her, has contracted tuberculosis, 
since returning from the war. 



Quito a laugh was handed to friends 
and members of the Poli Circuit when 
an entire column. of print, combined 
with an old tin type picture, appeared 
in one of the local papers, to the effect 
that Dan T. Sullivan, proprietor of the 
Oneco Hotel, and Thomas C. McPart- 
land, manager of the Yale Brewing Co., 
had teamed up for a tour of the Poll 
Houses. The two are very prominent- 
ly known throughout all New England, 
especially in the theatrical section of 
New England, subsequently are busy 
this week' answering a galore of con- 
gratulations. 

The Daniel Frawley Theatrical Co., 
which is touring the Orient, opened 
July 10 at Honolulu (Bijou) in "Three 
Faces East," to a packed house. This 
piece was played for four nights, fol- 
lowed by "3 Wise Fools," "Lightnin,"' 
"Scandal," "Turh^o rSS --Right," "Pofiy- 
With a Past," "East is West," "Parlor, 
Bedroom and Bath," and "Upstairs and 
Down," three nights each. . The com- 
pany sails for Yokohama, Aug. 10, to 
play Yokohama, Kobe, Tokio and Nag- 
asaki, Japan. Then Shanghai, China, 
six weeks will be spent in the prin- 
cipal cities of China. From there the 
tourists go to Manila, Singapore, Cey- 
lqn, Java, British India, Burma, Arabia,. 
Mesopotamia and Egypt. 

News from Continental Europe, the- 
atrically, is just commencing to drift 
in, telling in a way what has happened 
over there during the war. gCarres 
has sold his circus and a company has 
been organized to operate it with oper- 
ettes under the direction of Max Gab- 
rille, formerly of the Rembrandt thea- 
tre. Some of the Belgain and German 
acts that managed to miss the fighting 
line played return engagements num- 
berless times in all of the smaller con- 
tinental places. The Scala, at the 
Hague, has been sold and will take on 
the operette policy. Carl Hagenback 
was at Schoveningen (Holland) toward 
the end of June doing well there. 
Wortleys, Blessings and the Boston 
Brothers are with him. Steiner of the 
Wintergarden, Berlin, has a bad 
streak of luck. He left the Winter- 
garden, taking the Apollo, Berlin, then 
lost it, and after Steiner quit the 
house, it became a winner. His son 
broke his leg to add to the troubles. 
Saitmacher has left the Liebichs, Bres- 
lau. It has been sold to a corporation. 
Kornorah, of the International Artis- 
ten Loge, started something with the 
managers upon the Revolution in Ger- 
many breaking out. There is a wordy 
battle now on betwen the I. A. L. and 
the managers association. Anger, of 
Anger and Bauer, was in Karlsbad 
when the war broke and had to remain 
there'! He is a Bohemain. Later he 
entered the army as a lieutenant. Not 
much has been heard from him since. 
Bauer, a naturalized Englishman, was 
obliged to dissolve the firm, after 
many years of partnership. A con- 
tinental manager writing to a friend 



in England recommending a Dutch 
act, was informed in reply that there 
was no chance of any act not English, 
as. the English only wanted their own,: 
One continental manager closed his 
variety theatre during the war, pre- 
ferring it remain dark than to injure ' 

' his reputation for good bills with the 
poor programs he would have had lo" 
present A picture house: is building 
in Amsterdam, seating 2,000. ft wilL ?: 

/'play small turns in addition to fea- 
tutes. ; j __-.■• 

TOMMY'S TATTLES. 

(By Thomas J. Gray. 
A regular two-a-day rain storm 
washed up three bf our biggest air-- : ^ ; * 
planes, proving that railroad trains 
'and nice big ships will be the most 
popular mode of travel for some time 
■ to come. - 

Senate committee changed the "dry 1 ' 
bill allowing people to make a certain 
kind of elderberry wine in their own 
homes. Those who like hard liquor 
will get the raspberry. 

Reports say shoes will be $25 a pair 
in the fall, which may force Americans 
to wear wooden shoes. It should be 
a great year for buck dancers. '+-■• 



: 






I 



Theatrical Mysteries t 

Chorus girl's rehearsal clothes. 
Booking agent's silk shirts. 
What becomes of society dancers 
House manager's dress suit. 
"The Party of the Second Part. 




ressman suggests we send our 
army' into Mexico. You guessed it ! 
The Congressman is not in the army. . 

It would be .tough oh the boys who 
just ... got • through . struggling with 
French to naye to start in On Spanish; 
Besides, Mexico, is so far from Paris. 

Our Pictureless Costume PUy Movie. . 

The Gal lopps were one of- the old- 
est families^ ■ in ' > Tennesttfcky. ' \ i Glin-l 
ton, the eldest Gallopp, loses heavily at 
the gamhigr tables. Lord Eatingwell 
presses his suit for the hand of Con- 
stance. The -Earl- of Toothpaste i»v 
searching for new woodlands. " r r 

A chance meeting: v' 

Love finds the way. " '''V-'- 

Gallopp applies to Lord Eatingwell 
for a loan. .v*fc ' • ; "V.;.' 

"The price is your daughter?* : ; 

Conspiracy. -'•• --"■'■; ; vv '&*"''$&&&& 

"I arrest you; Eatingwell, on His 
Majesty's warrant;" - - iVI •- '•■/■■ 

The tables, turned. - 

"Father, I am to, be a. Duchess, 
gambling and I will help you;" 
' The old estate is saved; v •' 

The wedding was a ' gay affair. Ji 

—And their hearts were light when 
the leaves began to fall': 






■■ : '•?•. 



& * 



Actor's strike will not mean anything." 
in the lives of authors. No matter :: 
what happens the players and man- 
agers will' still .take credit for all suc- 
cesses and blame the authors for the 
failures. '; / 

Most people find out that picture ■',! 
companies talk about very large sums 
of money until you ask them for cash. '.* 

Dancing masters are trying to find r q 

some dance to succeed the "Shimmie." Jag 

Quite a surprise to find out that the "i;^ 

"Shimmie" was really supposed to be a ■■'■■..'& 
dance. 



Moving pictures with girl acts as an 
added attraction are getting quite 
popular, while song writers are fight- 
ing to name their songs after feature 
films. The girls look much better in 
the pictures and the songs sound much . 
better in the publishers' offices. 

May we now expect a call for en- 
tertainers to entertain the' troops used 
to stop the riots. 



)■<■% 






). 



: !iS^Skii|iO; .'VgiM. 






'.'-./,-"■. -.iv::- :■-■'-■- * ?H — -T ■-;:i"f •■:;"';'•'■. '■>;■ i.-J--..-; :".>' ■'> ■"•■■■■ ■'■ -•>-.' -1 ' :3 

• ' . '...•■.;' •';- - , 



:■!:;? 



12 f t r_i i >r i ii^ ATI? • 



LEGITIMATE 



1 



|:;. I 



_■_£.'. 



STRIKE FLIVS DESPITE PLEDGE 
EQUITY MEMBERS GAVE TO QUIT 

Ida Mulle, Lucy Beaumont and Ling Kept Away from "Chu, 

Chin. Chow" Rehearsals. Others, Gilmore Says, 

Promised They Would. Opening Postponed, 

But Morris Gest Says Walkout Has 

Nothing to Do With It. 



The nine A. E. A. members of "Chu 
Chin Chow" who refused to obey the 
orders of the Actors' Equity and walk 
out of the rehearsal Tuesday afternoon 
were summoned to A. E. A. headquar- 
ters Tuesday evening and according to 
Frank Gillmore, executive secretary 
of the organization, all signed a pledge 
placing themselves on record as re- 
fusing to rehearse Wednesday unless 
Comstock and Gest issued A. E. A.- 
U. M. P. A. contracts. 

Despite the pledge signing claimed 
by Gillmore, when "Chu Chin Chow" 
started to rehearse at 2 P. M. Wed- 
nesday/there were only two absentees, 
Ida Mulle and Lucy Beaumont Lionel 
Braham, Albert Howson, Edward Rase- 
ly, and Fred Kaufman, according to a 
statement issued by Comstock & Gest, 
were rehearsing notwithstanding their 
A. E A. membership. Claude Beer- 
bolm Tree has been engaged to replace 
Richie Ling, the sole A. E A. member' 
to quit the "Chu Chin Chow" cast 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Mr. Gillmore when informed of what 
had taken place at the Century, shortly 
after 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, 
said he would not be in a position to 
make a statement until he had received 
an official report on the matter from 
Miss Mulle and Miss Beaumont Asked 
whether those A. E. A. members who 
refused to obey the A. E. A.'s instruc- 
tions after signing the pledge to do 
bo would be expelled from the or- 
ganization, Mr. Gillmore said that if 
the reports were true, expulsions would 
more than likely follow. 

Mr. Gillmore stated the A. E. A. has 
formed no plans with respect to call- 
ing out the members of any. other com- 
Eany but that the proper steps would 
e taken to bring every manager in the 
P. M. A. into Ime when the time ar- 
rived. 

The opening of "Chu Chin Chow" has 
been postponed from Monday until 
next Friday, the postponement being 
occasioned by the non-arrival of cos- 
tumes from Europe according to Morris 
Gest. The walk out of the three A. 
E. A.'s, Mr. Gest declared, had nothing 
to do with the change of date. 

Sam Harris, president of the Produc- 
ing Managers Association, stated Wed- 
nesday that Cohan & Harris and all 
of the managers included in the P. M. 
A., were securing all the actors needed 
to fill their casts, despite the efforts 
of the A. E. A. to force its members 
to accept nothing but A. E. A.-U. M. 
P. A. standard contracts. Under no 
circumstances, Mr. Harris added, would 
his firm or any of those in the man- 
agers' organization issue any con- 
tract other than the P. M. A. contract. 
The possibilities of a strike call sim- 
ilar to that issued against Comstock 
& Gest by the A. E A. on Tuesday, 
was being directed against any other 
member of the P. M. A. or the organ- 
ization as a whole, would be discussed 
at a special meeting of the P. M. A. 
scheduled for Thursday (yesterday), 
Mr. Harris said. 

The opening skirmish in the long 
threatened war between the Actors' 
Equity Association and the Producing 
Managers' Association was won by the 
managers Tuesday afternoon when 
nine of ten A. E. A. members rehears- 
ing with Comstock & Gest's "Chu Chin 



Chow" refused to walk out in obe- 
dience to orders from A. E. A. head- 
?iuarters after Morris Gest had re- 
used to meet the demand of the 
A. E. A. that its members be given 
U. M. P. A.-AJ E A. standard con- 
tracts. 

. Richie Ling -was the sole A. E. A. 
member remaining loyal to his organi- 
zation, sending in his resignation 
shortly before 2 P. M., the time set 
for the Tuesday rehearsal. Marjorie 
Wood, one of the ten A. E. A.'s in the 
"Chu Chin Chow" cast, sent in her 
resignation to the Actors' Equity 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Frank Gillmore, executive secretary 
of the A. E. A., served notice on Mor- 
ris Gest Monday evening that unless 
the standard contracts were forthcom- 
ing at the Tuesday rehearsal, the 
A. E. A. members present would quit 
Gillmore then issued an order to 
A. E. A. members to walk out of the 
show if hot given the standard form. 
Mr. Gest made no reply to the A. E 
A.'s ultimatum until shortly before the 
Tuesday rehearsal, when he addressed 
the assembled company and stated 
that he did not intend to issue the con- 
tracts called for, and if any player de- 
sired to walk out he was free to do so. 
During Mr. Gest's speech he made 
mention of the treatment accorded ac- 
tors employed by him, adding that al- 
though he had never issued any form, 
of written contract since he entered 
the producing business seven years 
ago, no actor ever had occasion to file 
a lawsuit against him or the firm of 
Comstock & Gest. 

Gest also took a rap at Harry 
Mountford, styling him as "a labor 
agitator from England/ who accord- 
ins to report some years ago, was com- 
pelled to leave London after trying 
to foment labor troubles there." Gest 
likewise paid his respects to Francis 
Wilson and Frank Gilmore, describ- 
ing Wilson as a millionaire and Gill- 
more a fan English actor who has not 
worked at his profession for the last 
six years. • - 

At the A. E. A. offices a council meet- 
ing was in progress Tuesday afternoon 
following the ff Chu Chin Chow" fiasco. 
Francis Wilson, president of the A. 
E A., declared the organization was 
formulating - certain plans which he 
would make public at the proper time. 
Mr. Wilson was inclined to look at the 
"Chu Chin Chow" affair in the light of 
a trivial battle lost at the opening of 
the conflict, and one that did not nec- 
essarily have any bearing on the final 
outcome. 



"SCANDAL" DATE SET BACK. 

The date for the opening of "Scandal" 
in New York, at the Shubert Theatre, 
was set back four weeks, that time 
having been given to the attraction 
in Chicago. The New York date, now 
is Sept. 15. 

Immediately after the opening of the 
show in the East Walter Hast will open 
four new productions. 

The first of these will be "The Master 
of Balantree," with Walker Whiteside 
starred, which will open in Buffalo on 
Sept. 22. A week later, in Detroit, he 
will present Cosmo Hamilton's new 
play, "An Exchange of Wives," with 
Lee Baker, Forrest Winant, Helen Bol- 
ton and Stanley Harrison in the cast 
On Oct. 6 Toronto will be the scene 
of the opening performance of "Eve 
and the Man," by Frederick Bruegger, 
a Chicago newspaper man. It is an 
occult drama. Ramsey Wallace and 
Marion Coakley are to be in the cast 

Hast's fourth production will be a 
dramatization of the LeRoy m Scott 
story, which has been running in one 
of the magazines under the title of 
"A Daughter of Two Worlds." Hast 
arranged for the play rights to the 
story this week. Just before he closed 
his contract the Eminent Authors tied 
up the picture rights. 

Walter Hast has signed all the prin- 
cipals for the four companies of "Scan- 
dal," which he will produce again next 
season. Charles Cherry and Francis 
Larrimore will have the leading roles 
in New York. Malcolm Fassett and 
' Betty Murray will head the western 
cast, with Emma Bunting and Herbert 
Ran son for the South, and Smyth Wal- 
lace, the East. 

Lee Baker, Forrest Winant, Lucille 
Manion, Helen Bolton, Marion Coak- 
ley and Florence Shirley have been 
signed to appear in the new play which 
Mr. Hast recently secured from Cosmo 
Hamilton to be produced early. in the 
Autumn. 



CAN'T GET STAGE DIRECTORS. 

The dearth of competent stage di- 
rectors may cause the postponement 
of a number of productions that were 
scheduled for production during the 
month of August. During the last 
week there was a general scramble on 
the part of producers, to secure men 
to direct the staging' of productions 
for them. 

John Cort tried to secure Hugh Ford 
from the Famous Players-Lasky to 
direct the staging of "Three's a Crowd," 
but Ford stated that he was tied up 
and could not take on any outside 
productions. Another producer made 
the English producer, Robert Courten- 
idge, an offer to remain over and stage 
a production for him, but was likewise 
turned down. 



DENIES EQUITY ACCUSATION. 

Chamberlain Brown denies he is in 
the direct employ of the managers to 
advise members of the Equity to resign 
from the organization. Brown stated 
this week that several members of the 
Equity had advised him that they had 
been informed at headquarters that he 
was on the salary role of the Produc- 
ing Managers' Association and that he 
was paid to advise artists to quit 
the Equity.' The agent says his advice 
to artists was only given by him 
because he thought it was to the best 
interest of those that he advised. 

Brown does not deny that he has 
been advising several members of the 
Equity under contract to him per- 
sonally to quit the organization. A 
number of artists have given him, as 
well as other agents, he says, power 
of attorney to sign contracts for them, 
and as long as these agreements are 
in force the agents will not recognize. 
the Equity's demands and will sign up 
under whatever conditions they deem 
to the best advantage of the actor. 

ROLSTER COPS COPS' BENEFIT. 

Chicago, July 30. 

In competition with 25 other attrac- 
tions, Nat Royster, representing Com- 
stock & Gest, won out on the annual 
benefit of the Chicago Policemen's 
Benevolent Association, Which takes 
the form of a show each year at the 
Auditorium. 

The attraction this year will be "Oh, 
Look," with the Dolly Sisters and a 
prominent male actor in the Harry 
Fox role. The show will run for three 
weeks, from Oct. 12 to Nov. 2. 

The date nets Comstock & Gest a 
flat sum of $21,000, it was announced. 

NEW "FROLIC REHEARSING. 

The new shows for the Amsterdam 
Roof, to replace the present couple 
of "Frolic" entertainments given up 
there nightly by Flo Ziegfeld, started 
rehearsals Tuesday. 

The new productions are to be made 
ready around Aug. 20. 



"LISTEN LESTER'S" PROFIT. 

Crossing the $100,000 profit mark last 
Wednesday night during its 33-Week 
run to date, "Listen Lester," the Cort 
show at the Knickerbocker, is but one 
of many straws showing producing 
managers the way the wind is blowing 
at this time of Manhattan showdom's 
history. The tidings carried to the 
producers by the straws include the 
fact that not a single theatre in 
Greater New York is available just 
now for any sort of theatrical pro- 
duction.' 

"Listen Lester" is mentioned merely 
as an illustration of the situation. 
Voted by the informed when originally 
produced as a musical comedy of but 
passing interest, scarcely suitable to 
S2 Broadway, undistinguished by any 
specially big name., and its characters 
played, for the most part, by Broad- 
way unfamiliars, Ada Lewis, Gertrude 
Vandervilt, Johnnie Dooley, its hotel 
clerk, and one or two others excepted, 
the Cort show's business has. hovered . 
near the $18,000 gross mark per week 
the greater part of its run, rarely drop- 
ping below $12,000, and but once, 4th 
of July week, dropping as low as $7,000. 

With a show of its kind getting this 
big money, receipts unheard of at the 
Knickerbocker save by Montgomery 
and Stone, the producing managers 
with> plays on the stocks are fast mak- 
ing their plans to get into their in- 
itial action the coming season in cities 
outside, and wait till the tide in New 
York gets lower. 

Indication of the way the theatre 
stocks are jammed with plays . wait- 
ing for an opening is Leo Deitrich- 
stein, a star who at almost any other 
time in the past needed but to indi- 
cate his desire to begin a New York 
season to. have the way opened for 
him. Just now, equipped with a new 
production that has all the potentials 
of big success, the actor-manager can- 
not find an opening. A full dozen 
other producers are similarly plighted 
at this time. One of the freak illus- 
trations of the situation is offered in 
the case of Lawrence Anhalt, of the 
. Park Theatre, who,' after sub-leasing 
his Columbus Circle house to the So- 
ciety of American Singers, bought a 
farce and is now striving ineffectively 
to find a place somewhere in Greater 
New York to play it 

COBURN'S NOTE CASE ADJOURNED. 

As Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coburn 
were out of town on their vacation 
(their roles in the "Better 'Ole" being 
taken by others), T. Garland Tinsley. 
who is suing them for the recovery ot 
$9,000, was unable to secure a hearing 
before a special session of the Su- 
preme Court Tuesday. 

Tinsley, through Henry J. and Fred- 
erick E Goldsmith, intended entering 
judgment on several notes aggregating 
the sum in question, the notes having 
been endorsed over to him by Alex- 
ander T. Herd, the Wall Street man, 
who had originally "angeled" the pro- 
duction and who is said to have cleaned 
up a quarter of a million thereby. 

Recently the Coburns expressed the 
desire to buy out Herd's interest 
with the purchase price in the neigh- 
borhood of $100,000. The greater part 
was paid in cash. $25,000 was paid by 
notes, of which $16,000 had been sat- 
isfied. The plaintiff alleges the Co- 
burns refused to make good the re- 
maining $9,000, hence the suit 

The trial was postponed until Sept 5. 

KENT BACK WITH HAMMERSTEIN. 

Thedecision of the Managers' Asso- 
ciation on the controversy between 
Arthur Hammerstein and the Shuberts 
over the services of William Kent, the 
comedian, was decided in favor of 
Hammerstein. 

Whether Kent will leave the "Gaie- 
ties" show immediately to await the 
call from the Hammerstein office or re- • 
main with the show until Hammer- 
stein starts rehearsing "Somebody's 
Sweetheart" has not as yet been 
settled. 

/ 



g„> 






LEGITIMATE 



DRAMAS ON BOLSHEVIKI COMING 
TO LIVEN UP AUGUST SHOWINGS 

. \ ... . . ■ • 

/. .*-. ■ ■■ ■ 

"The Challenge" Date Advanced to Beat "Red Dawn" to New 

York. Weather the Business Barometer. Four 

Additional Houses Dark. Current Shows All 

Set for Summer Run. 






- 



It's all up to the weather, with the 
breaks thus far much in favor of the 
H theatres. There was one wallop Mon- 
day night that had the managers look- 
p ing for cover, but. with Tuesday there 
came a cool spell which again turned 
the tide in the managerial favor. 
Monday night was the worst night of 
the season and all the hotels were 
"stuck" on their buys, even the "Fol- 
lies" stuff was dumped into the cut 
. rates on that night. 

The general outlook from this week 
is that Broadway is just about set on 
the attractions that will go through 
-for the summer, there being but two 
•' doubtful ones and they are "La La 
| Lucille" at the Miller, and "39 East" 
at the Maxine Elliott Just how long 
| they will be able to stand the gaff 
should a spell of hot weather hit the 
street is a question. The others, how- 
ever, look as though they .'will be able 
to weather any kind of a storm and 
last until the Labor Day date brings 
the new ones for the 1919-1920 season 
onto the street. 

This week finds three closings 
marked up, which will bring a total 
of four houses added to the "dark" 
list The Spanish Opera at the Cort 
blew after Saturday night's perform- 
ance. That house will remain dark 
until "A Regular Fellow" comes in on 
Aug. 13, although there is a possibility 
that the "Greenwich Village Follies" 
r may be moved into the Cort for a run. 
I Those closing this week are 'Three 
i~-. Wise Fools" at the Criterion, "The 
Little Journey" at the Vanderbilt, and 
"Up In Mabel's Room," at the Eltinge. 
The latter house will remain dark all 
through August and about Sept 1 
"Not Tonight Josephine" will be pre- 
sented there. 
L; Last week the weather played pecu- 
liar tricks in New York and the box 
offices moved along in accord with the 
atmospheric variations. The early 
S part of the week while it was damp 
8 brought money. Then a couple of dry 
days caused a slight slump, with Satur- 
~ day night away off at all of the houses 
because of the terrific electrical storm 
which broke about theatre time. 

The two openings of the week were 
"A Voice In the Dark" at the Republic, 
and "Oh, What a Girl I" at the Shubert, 
both on Monday night The former 
is third of the murder mystery plays 
that has been presented in New York 
during the month of July. A. H. 
Woods is the manager and the notices 
were great, the wise ones stating that 
If the show had been presented during 
the regular season in cool weather 
there wouldn't have been a doubt but 
that the show would have burnt up 
the town. The show at the Shubert 
is one of the rather old fashioned 
musical comedies that served as sum- 
mer shows years ago. The Shuberts 
engineered a buy for the attraction for 
four weeks before it came to New 
York. There are 300 seats a night 
with the agencies with a 25 per cent 
return allowed. 

The race to be the first on the scene 
with a play dealing with the Bolshe- 
vism theme, caused Selwyn and Com- 
pany to switch the opening date of 
Holbrook Blinn in the Eugene Walter 
play "The Challenge" from Aug. 11 to 
Aug. 5 at the Selwyn. 'The Red 
Dawn," another play on the same 









theme opened this week in Washing- 
ton and is due at the 39th Street the 
following night 

With the exception of Monday night 
the Public Service and the Joe Leblang 
cut-rate agencies have been , doing a 
corking business -during the summer. 
Monday night the "dump" from the 
hotels to them coupled with their own 
stock found both overboard. With 12 
attractions listed as regulars on their 
boards and with' occasional others 
from the hotels they are holding up 
nicely. Orchestra seats can be had 
for "Up In Mabel's Room," "Listen 
Lester/' "39 East" and "The Little 
Journey," while balcony locations are 
available for "A Lonely Romeo," 
"Three Wise Fools," "John Ferguson," 
"She's a Good Fellow," "The Five Mil- 
lion," "At 9.45," "Oh What a Girl" and 
"Monte Cristo, Jr." 

In the premium agencies there are 
eight buys running at present The 
latest to be added was "Oh What a 
Girl," at 300 a night for four weeks 
with 25 per cent, return. All the agen- " 
cies now, with the exception of the 
Leo Newman agency, are handling 
seats for the "Greenwich Village Fol- 
lies." Originally the Newman agency 
had the inside track at the house and 
froze out all the others, then Al Jones 
of the Broadway bought 51 per cent 
of the show and in turn passed up the • 
Newman outfit giving all the other 
offices seats for the village show. The 
buy for "A Lonely Romeo" at the 
Casino ends tomorrow night with 
small likelihood of it being renewed. 
At the Globe "She's a Good Fellow" 
has still four weeks to run. The oth- 
ers are "The Follies" "Scandals of 
1919," "Gaieties of. 1919" and The 
Royal Vagabond." 

HAMMERSTE1N IN COMA. 

Oscar Hammerstein is a patient in 
Lenox Hill Hospital, at 77th street and 
Park avenue, with little hope of his 
recovery held out. The impresario and 
manager was removed there late last 
week and Sunday lost consciousness. 

Monday he was reported in a' state 
of coma, and the attending physicians 
gave up hope late that afternoon. 

SHANNON'S SHOW AND CAST. 

"What's The Qdds," the musical 
version of "Checkers," which Sam 
Shannon is producing may have its 
metropolitan premier at the Liberty, 
Sept. 7. 

The cast includes George McKay, 
Mabel Withee, Billy Meehan, Vera 
Michalena and Rene Riano. 

The production will remain out for 
a week before the New York opening. 

Forty-six Weeks for Brooklyn Stock. 

The Fifth Avenue Stock of Brook- 
lyn has completed a record stock run, 
as far as this city is concerned, of 46 
consecutive weeks, breaking its run to 
allow the players some respite. 

May Melvin, who has been leading 
the company the past 46 weeks, and 
Edward Vail, the director, are on vaca- 
tion prior to the opening of the new 
season, the middle of the month. 



LEDERER'S FILM SATIRE. 

George W. Lederer, who gave Amer- 
ica its first revue, taken from the 
French manner, when he produced 
"The Passing Show," announces among 
new plans tor the coming season a 
big musical revue with filmdom the 
target of its start, middle and finish. 

Lederer, how scoring at the'Colonial, 
Chicago, with* the new Herbert-Smith 
musicality, "Angel Face," says he sees 
in filmdom a subject the livest popu- 
larly for musical expression just now. 
He will write the piece himself in col- 
laboration with Harry B. Smith, and 
will apply to it the observations he 
got when he was himself making pic- 
tures, a field he entered about eight 
years ago during one of his theatrical 
submersions. 

At present the producing manager 
is hesitating between calling the pro- 
duction "That Night" or "Next Day." 
He proposes to satirically summarize 
much of what he terms the absurdities 
of filmdom's acting and studio direc- 
tion. The piece, he says, will be in the 
nature of a "Passing Show" in films. 
Where in the stage satire of his first 
revue venture the producer kidded 
most of the celebrities of the real foot- 
lights, in "That Night"— or "Next Day" 
— he will play tag for laughs with the 
personal characteristics and idiosyn- 
cracies of most of the big picture stars, 
directors, and, in some instances, with 
the executive heads of the film game 
generally. It is said that the satire will 
take broadside shots at many of pic- 
tures' best known people. 

A part of the Lederer film laugh 
stuff, it is said, points out the fact that 
not one of about 400 film directors 
who comprise the film field has ever 
written a successful play for the speak- 
ing stage, and never directed one. 



DODGE JOINS PRODUCERS. 

Wendell Phillips Dodge, general 
press representative for- David Be- 
la'sco, has resigned to take effect today. 
He will join the ranks of the produc- 
ing managers with Willy Pegany as a 
partner. The latter is the famous art- 
ist •and designer of stage settings and! 
costumes. They have formed a cor- 
poration for the production of plays' 
and for the running of theatres and 
are trying to secure a lease on a New 
York playhouse at present 

The first production will be a dra- 
matic spectacle with incidental music 
and ballet features. It is entitled 
"Esther," in three acts and nine scenes. 
It is to be produced in New York in 
October. 

The play was written by the Baron- 
ess Leonie de Souiny, who has been 
identified with the continental theatre 
for a number of years. The initial 
production is to be followed by a series 
of light comedies and a musical pro- 
duction. 

The financial backing for the initial 
production is guaranteed by a move- 
ment in this country for which the 
production will act as a strong propa- 
ganda argument 

AMSTERDAM GETS "HITCHY K00." 

When the Raymond Hitchcock "Hit- 
chy-Koo" show comes into New York 
after having played four weeks out of 
town it is to follow the "Follies" at 
the Amsterdam. The opening date set 
this week is Aug. 18 at Atlantic City, 
and then to the Colonial, Boston, for 
three weeks, after which the New York 
date is scheduled. 

This week Mark Sullivan was added 
to the cast The show now has about 
80 people all told. 

Karl K. Kitchen is to do the advance 
for the attraction. 



BILL POSTERS THEATRE STRIKE. 

The bill posters of Greater New 
York, through their local unions, sent ' 
out letters to every manager in the 
territory covered by the organization 
Tuesday afternoon demanding a wage .■:,; 
increase of 18 per cent over the present , 
scale, designating Aug. 25 as the 'date 
upon which the new scale is to become 
effective. If the wage demand is not 
met the bill posters will strike. 

The reason for presenting the wage ■'•. 
demands to the individual theatre 
managers instead of the U. M. P. A. or 
the producing Managers' Association 
was because of the fact that many of 
the large producing managers like 
William A. Brady and A. H. Woods 
use no paper to advertise their show's 
in the Greater New York territory. 
The bill posters decided that the U. M. 
P. A. or P. M. A. might be inclined to 
disregard the claims of the union 
owing to this condition. 

Union bill posters doing work on the 
ground now receive $21 a week. The - 
new scale calls for $25 weekly. Bill., 
stickers doing extra hazardous work, 
on elevated stands now receive $25 a 
week. Under the proposed new scale 
$30 weekly is asked for this kind of 
work. ..'.v- ■■' 

The bill posters received 20 per cent - 
Increase about a year ago, the manj"\ 11 
agers coming through just in time to 

avert a .walkout. : „ ■'..•'."» 

■, '-. " -•■ ■■: 

CANADIAN STAGEHANDS RAISED. 

The musicians and stage hands at- 
tached to the Loew and Canadian 
Circuit houses were raised in salary, 
subsequent to a through canvass made 
by S. H. Meinhold, supervising man- : 
age r of the. Loew Circuit, and Clark 
Brown, president and booking manager. / 
of the Canadian Circuit 

As a result the Canadian Circuit em- . 
ployes, including the Dominion, Ot- 
tawa; Princess and St Denis, Mont- 
real, and Lyric, Hamilton, were granted 
an increase of over 20 per cent week*. 
!y, 'while the employes at the Canadian 
Loew Theatres were only increased ' .•■'. 
about 10 per cent weekly, as their-:, 
wages were previously higher. 

The wages of both houses now are 
on an equal basis. 

"NIGHTIE" FULL OF LAUCHS. 

Long Branch, N. J., July 30* , 
Although the demand for theatres in 
New York is so great that many new 
shows will have to wait until well into " 
the fall and then take their chances, 
"Nightie Night" offered here Monday 
evening by Adolph Klauber, will get 
immediate booking. It was received 
with such gales of laughter that Gom- 
stock & Gest immediately offered Mr. 
Klauber the Princess Theatre. "Nigh- 
tie Night" will open there next week. 
This new farce by Adelaide Mat- 
thews and Martha M. Stanley, is hil- 
ariously funny, and is splendidly played 
by Francis Byrne, Dorothy Mortimer, 
Susanne Willa, Malcolm Duncan, Marie 
Chambers and others. 



i 



A 



.-.■i.-^iu\ t 



; ';'M 



-' -..'1 






Lucy Weston Engaged by Selwym. 

The return to the Broadway stage 
of Lucy Weston will be made in the 
fall through the medium of a musical 
production by the Selwyns. 



SHUBERTS PRODUCING "TAXI." 
The Shuberts will make the pro- 
duction of "Call A Taxi," the Earl Car- 
roll show, originally placed by Mr. 
Carroll with A. H. Woods. Woods has 
transferred the script to the Shuberts, 
retaining an interest 



HARRIS' HUNT FOR JUVENILES. 

William Harris. Jr., has finally com- 
pleted his hunt tor the five juveniles :> 
needed for his play, "Dark Horses." ' 
So much trouble was involved in get- - 
ting the men necessary for the piece 
that- Samuel Shipman advocated the - > 
opening of a conservatory for the de- 
velopment of leading men. 

Chamberlain Brown finally came to 
the rescue with a quintet of leading: 
juveniles to fill the bill. They are : 
Richard Dix, Walter 'Lewis, Robert 
Strange, Hazzard Short and E. G. 
Robertson. Eloise Barton has also 
been engaged for the company. 

MOROSCO'S BOSTON HOUSE. 

Oliver Morosco, through his attor- 
neys, House-Grossman-Vorhaus, have 
cempleted arrangements whereby the 
producer will build a new theatre in 
Boston, located on Tremont street It ': 
will house legitimate attractions. 



,,'^' r ' -V' 



14 



LEGITIMATE 



m\: 



m 



ONE-A-MINUTE. 

Washington, July 80. 

With the use of tbe pruning knife In a 
few spots Fred Jackson's new comedy, "One- 
A-Mlnute," produced here for the first time by 
the Oarrick Players- at the Shubert-Garrlck 
Theatre last night, will be a success. The 
comedy was more than well received at Its 
initial showing and gave Lynne Overman and 
Mrs. Jacques .Martin excellent opportunities 
Which they took full advantage of. 

The story Is an oft used one, that of the 
poor boy who through his own cleverness turns 
the tide, sells out to the rich old miser and 
gets the girl; but It is mighty refreshing to 
have this sort of story, told as cleverly aa It 
was last night, after the continuous run of 
bed room farces that have been repeatedly 
shown to our tired audiences. 

The girl Is fighting to hold the family drug 
store against the heavy competition of the 
drug trust, and things are going mighty bad 
with her when Jimmy, the drug olerk, and 
Pitt, the village editor, take things in hand 
and Invent a concoction that will cure all 
Ills. Of course it is a fake, but wonderful 
cures are accomplished because of the faith 
that the users put into It The result Is not 
hard to fathom, of course; it sells in great 
quantities and follows with a large advertising 
campaign* 

Mrs. Jacques Martin's performance of 
"Granny Knight" was really remarkable and 
most lovable, her first act as the tottering old 
lady and then the rejuvenation from the 
taking of the remedy until she becomes a 
devotee of tbe Jazz king and the gay white 
way. It was a comedy triumph, presented 
with all the skill of a veteran player. 

The part of Jimmy seems to have been 
written for Lynne Overman; he takes full 
advantage of the many comedy opportunities, 
and his interview with the deputation from 
the Mayor 1b. one, if not the most amusing 
scenes In the play. He should play the' role 
when the piece is presented In New York City. 

Eileen Wilson has only limited opportunities 
in this piece. Donald Meek gives an excellent 
-performance of the drug magnate.. Robert 
Williams is excellent as the editor, while 
Marlam Collins and Dorla Sheerln are equally 
well cast. An Individual bit was scored by 
a little colored lad appearing as the errand 
boy. Meakin. 

THE GOLDEN AGE. 

Atlantic City, July 80. 

"The Golden Age," which opened here Mon- 
day with production of George C. Tyler, turned 
Into almost a veritable tribute to Helen Hayes. 
The play, by Sidney Toler and Marlon Short, 
is of the golden age of youth, of puppy love 
and the crisis in a girl's career when love 
enters in the period where adolescence blooms 
Into womanhood. 

Miss Hayes Is the girl and her moments of 
lite, laughter and tears are splendid examples 
of an art that is bound again to make an 
impression. The story Is light and fragile, but 
the acting puts into It a charm and natural- 
ness that la of indelible impression. Donald 
Gallaher, calm and sturdy in his part, was 
the lover's foil, the tool oft a rich aunt who 
tries to interrupt the love affairs. 

Glenn Hunter was the real sweetheart's 
choice and youthful in his palpitant heart 
interest, with a plain honesty. Claire Mer- 
sereau, Paul Kelly, Genevieve Tobin, Marlon 
Abbott and Minna Oale with Vivian Ogden 
were aUo In the cast; and Joe Wallace in a 
Sis Hopkins' role was dominant in an old 
maid part 

- For Miss Hayes "The Golden Age" is a rare 
treat— an opportunity that it may be hoped 
she will realize on Broadway soon, for the 
expansion of her youhttul art will come In 
such plays as this— not In mere airy nothings — 
like Clarence. Boheuer. 

OH, WHAT A GIRL! 

Downes Larry Francis 

Can- Mat Murphy 

Taylor George Stlfter 

Smather William Zlnnel 

Holmes Harold Hulen 

Williams William Barry 

Ross Dave Dreyer 

Washington Lew Cooper 

Bill Corcoran .. Frank Fay 

Jack Ruahton Bam Ash 

Margot Merrlvale Hazel Klrke 

Lola Chappello •. Vera Groset 

Lulgl Fravola Ignaclo Martinettl 

Deacon Amos Titmouse Harry Kelly 

Perkins Sam Curtis 

Susie Smith Nancy Fair 

Amanda Titmouse Elizabeth Moffat 

Cinderella Clarice Snyder 

Prince Charming. ...... .Ethel' Mary Oakland 

Fairy Godmother Ma-Belle 

Head Walter Lester Scbarff 

Lee and J. J. Shubert picked out about tbe 
hottest night of the year for the launching in 
New Tork of their musical farce, "Ob, What a 
Girl!" which la the renamed "Oh, Uncle," 
show that has been hovering In the offing for 
qnlte a few weeks. The night was Monday 
and tbe place tbe Shubert Theatre, from which 
Lew Fields' "Lonely Romeo" was moved to 
the Casino to make room for the new attrac- 
tion. 

The show Is one of those typical summer 
musical comedies of an era In the past. It 
iBn't the summer type of revue with which tbe 
tired buslnes man 1b supposed to be refreshed 
in recent years, but rather harks back to the 
days of the "Sergeant Brue," "Jewel of 
Asia," etc., type of summer shows. In gen- 
eral Idea the plot goes back even beyond that 



by a great deal. But to offset It, Frankle 
Fay and Harry Kelly are in the cast to 
handle the comedy, and they do that little 
thing. Despite the heat the audience did seem 
to enjoy the foolery of these two comedians. 

The plot is the time worn device of the 
country unole, a deacon, who gum shoes Into 
New Tork every once In a while for a fling. 
His nephew Is a wild boy In tbe big town and 
in love with an actress, but unk has a coun- 
try Susan band picked and waiting for the 
boy when he comes back. But tbe old boy on 
one of his trips to the city Bees the girl, falls 
for her and decides to be an angel for her 
show. Down on the farm he Is Deacon Tit- 
mouse. In New York he 1b Mr. Brown. On 
the night he is to bear tbe score of tbe ahow 



A VOICE IN THE DARK. 

Miss Orldley.... Doris Kelly 

Sam Cloyd ..Frank Monroe ' 

Robert Farrel ..W. L. Thome • 

Harlan Day Wlllam Boyd 

Tom Hemmlngway. . . Stewart ID. Wilson 

Adele Warren . .-.' Georgia Lee Hall 

Blanche Warren '. Olive Wyndham 

Mrs. Marie Lydiard ...Plorine Arnold 

Amelia Blllngham. . 

Miss Meredith 

Hugh Satnabury .........Richard Gordon 

Madge Conroy Anne Sutherland 

John Malone .........John Sharkey 

Joe Crampton. ..... .William B. Made 

A. H. Woods brought "A Voice in the 



he Is to eiwl he aeta It uo and I Invites all^ Dark." a new play by Ralph B. Dyer, into 
n . B ** Y? angei ne gets in up ana invites "'»-«• fh d„„,,mi„ m™jI_ ~ an i n Z „„« «f »ho tint. 



the folks down to the farm, with the result 
wifey gets wise and incidentally soused 
through the manipulations of the light comic 
of the cast. Then everyone comes right on 
back to New Tork for a night on the Century 
Grove where all the complications are 
straightened out and the lovers sent along 
their merry way. 

As said before, the ahow relies mainly on 
the two comedians to get It over. Mr. Kelly 
plays the deacon and Mr. Fay is the genteel 
comic who Is hero In the play and stage 
manages all of the surprises of the evening. 
Other than that the show Is just a- series of 
specialties, the story lending Itself nicely u 
the hanging on of dance features and the in- 
terpolation of numbers that were not originally 
In the score. 

Musically the piece holds the usual waits 
theme that is put over three or tour times. 
It la "Oh, What a Girl!" and rather pretty. 
Other than that there la a "shimmy" number 
that Fay handles to perfection, especially 
staging one of his Reisenweber "shimmies" 
that gats over In great shape, later an audi- 
ence number, "Such a Baby," led by Nancy 
Fair, gives the chorus a chance 
close touch with the front rows, 
girl Is a very pleasing soubret type who gets 
to the audience very nicely In the two num- 
bers she has In the second act. The prima 
donna Is Hazel Klrke, rather pretty and with 
a very charming voice. Another of the sing- 
ing women principals Is Vera Groset, who 
hasn't much more to do than to look pretty 
and occasionally fill In on an ensemble of tbe 
principals. Elisabeth Moffat In a 'Character 
role is very effective. 

Of the male principals Lew Cooper In blaok 
face got over two numbers to applause. The 
'first a song about the "Gimme Gal" comes 
rather too early to get over as well as It 
Bhould. In the last scene of the second act 
tbe Irving Berlin song, "I've Got My Captain 
Working for Me," was a wallop. The harem 
number Cooper la doing as an encore has 
been "good". In too many other summer shows 
to land effectively with a first night audience 
at any rate. Sam Ash with his voice Is also 
on the scene. He le the heroic nephew, and 
his voice won thunders of applause. Ignaclo 
Martinettl In a role typical of his past char- 
acterizations, with bis familiar steps, scored 
nicely. Sam Curtis, formerly of vaudeville 
school acta, was a laugh in one scene with a 
blck rube character bit. 

of the dance specialties there were a flock. 
They started In tbe first act and continued 
right along through the show. Renee Adores 
and Lewis Bloden started things with a fox 
trot that was liked. Then Ma-Belle did 
some toe stepping, after which Harry Kelly 
burlesqued her number and was a riot with It. 
In tbe second act in the "Prince Charming 
number Ma-Belle got another chance, but the 



PROVIDENCE STILL TIED UP. * 

-'■- Providence, E. I., July 30. 

The theatres of this city and other 
parts of the state opened their doors 
on Monday confronted by the' second 
week Of a state-wide ' trolley, strike 
which has' completely tied up the 
".".".'.'.Arteen Hackett Rhode Island Company's system and 
Harriet Robs caused a large loss in business to phvy-> 
houses as well as raising havoc with 
business in general. .'•'.. 

When the week opened the strike 
was as far from a settlement as when 
it began and indications were that 
should the strike continue all this 
week the theatres will feel it to a 
much larger extent than during the 
first week of the trouble. >5 ' 

During the first nine days of the 
strike there were plenty of automo- 
biles being operated as jitneys, and 
although the fares charged were 
higher than those charged by the trol- 
ley company before the strike, they 
were well patronized and thousands 
used them in coming into the center 
of the city. ' 

Then came the move by Federal au- 
thorities. Autoists were rounded up 
and told that if they continued to 
operate as jitneys they must pay the 
$10 Federal tax. This caused a drop 
of more than 50 per cent, in the num- 



the Republic Monday evening, one of the hot- 
test nights of the year, and got away with it. 
There were several reasons for this. The 
play Is a novelty, for one thing. It Ib capably 
acted, for another, in particular* by OUve 
Wyndham, who has a grace of attitude, a 
charm of mannor, c, way with her that lent to 
every minute she was on the stage the Interest 
a lovely woman always has for men and a well 
dressed woman for all women. 

But Miss Wyndham did not walk away, by 
any means, with every honor. The cast was 
even, and Florlne Arnold, Arleen Hackett, 
Anne Sutherland, William Boyd, Frank Mon- 
roe and Richard Gordon all made their work 
stand out Georgia Lee Hall and William B. 
Mack were disappointing, the latter because 
of the indistinctness of his diction. , 

As WlUard Mack, tbe play's doctor, re- 
marked in a witty curtain speech. Al Woods 
had been labeled a "nut" for trying "A Voice 
in the Dark" at all. That la typical of Broad- 
way opinion. All Broadway believes in what 
has been tried, and then someone with nerve 
tries something new and makes money. For 
this show will make money. It Is a simple 
r*to'"get ,, lnto ^lli the old, old story, but in the method/ of „^ er f jitneys and thousands of peo- 
'. Vis Fair »w{»* there is novelty and there the battle | . ^ ^ oMigtd tQ walk ^^ 

The prolog shows a coroner's Inquest, with from their work and have thus been 
a paralyzed old woman, Mrs. Lydiard, ex- k ep t away from the show houses, 
plaining what she saw pass between Blanche 



Warren and Hugh Salisbury, the murdered 
man. Mrs. Lydiard is deaf. With tbe aid of 
an -instrument she can hear close to, but could 
not hear Blanche Waren and Salaebury, 
though from their expreslons she knew they 
were quarreling. 

Harlan Day loves Blanche Warren, and 1b 
a lawyer. He . undertakes to dear her. and 
sends for Mrs. Lydiard. Aa he questions her 
the stage darkens. A faint light alone plays 
on the old woman's face, then dies out, and 
the stage brightens on the scene of a murder. 
Here Mrs. Lydlard's view of it is acted. She 
cannot hear what la said, so the action is 
given by Miss Wyndham and Mr. Gordon In 
very effective pantomime. 

Going back, then, to Day's office, Blanche 
Warren tolls the man she loves her side of 
tbe tragedy. Once more, this time with the 
light on Miss Wyndham's face, the stage 
darkens. When the light breaks again, It Is 
the scene of the murder. This time Blanche 
Warren's version is acted and we hear every 
word, and understand better the nature of the 
case. Back in Day's office a clever bit of 
blackmail is well ' staged, and, following It, 
Day's partner appears with a blind, old' news- 
man who has overheard In tbe dark at the 
railroad station a woman's voice confessing 
tbe murder of Salnsbury. Tbe voice is not 
the voice of Blanche Warren. 

Whose voice, then, was it? Here the in- 
terest tightens, and with '- the blind newsman 
talking the stage darkens and then only 



work of the two kiddles, Clarice Snyder and faintly lightens to reveal the railroad station, 

an amazingly effective piece of stage carpen- 



rrvin ul . imo itvv niuuico, uinjiLc kjujuci nuu 

Ethel Mary Oakland, really walked away with 
the honors here, especially the little Snyder 
girl. She Is mighty clever for a youngster. 
In the Century Roof scene there were two 
other dance specialties, a girl doing toe work 
and a team, with a whirlwind acrobatic 
specialty that fairly tied up the show. 

There are 22 girls in tbe chorus. Fourteen 
are big girls and there are eight In the dance 
act. They average fairly well on looks, al- 
though they are no raving beauties. In cos- 
tuming they are well taken care of. There are 
also six boys, and this Includes tbe Manhattan 
Comedy Four, who also play bits of a few 
lines each in a poker game that opens the 
show. 

Tbe book and lyrics of "Oh, What a Girl I" 
are by Edgar Smith and Edward Clark. The 
latter Is responsible for the staging of the 
piece. The music Is by Charles Jules and 
Jacques Presberg. 

Two acts, with three full stage scenes, and 
a scene In "one," are required for the telling 
of the story. The first Is a pretty but Inex- 
pensive Interior. The opening of the second 
act has a very effective rural set which Is 
followed by a scene In one be/ore a country 
lane drop. The final scene Is the Century 
roof, very well done. 

The business has many old bits and gags. 
Two of the bits, tbe first of which was lifted 
from Vlollnlsky, Is the tossing of change to 
tbe sleepy pianist. The other is the drunken 
scene with the deacon's wife becoming tipsy 
because booze has been spilled into the old 
oaken bucket There are a couple of other 
scenes equally as well tried and proven. As 
for the "gags," the least said tbe better. 

But aa a summer show, "Ob, What a Girl I" 
will stick along at tbe Shubert until about the 
middle of September, and get about enough to 
get It by, although at a Hash the salary list 
looks to be pretty heavy for tbe attraction. 
However, tbe show will stand up and go right 
along as long as Fay and Kelly stick In the 
laugh division. If | Fay ever gets over Im- 
pressing the audience with his tremendous 
self assurance he Ib going to be a mighty 
valuable man In musical comedy, for clean out 
comedians of bis type are few and far be- 
tween, prei. 



try. and tbe adaption of means to an end. 
What the blind man heard, We hear, but are 
practically In tbe same boat with him. so far 
as seeing Is concerned, because of the darkness 
of the stage. Again the cut-back to the 
lawyer's office, and again in the midst of an 
effectively presented climax, 

What all this novelty in playwrlghting con- 
sists of Ib, of course, the moving picture cut- 
back. It was tried by Elmer L. Rice In "On 
Trial," and the newness here consists in the 
pantomime, with the added, significant and 
artistic end, the exclamations of the old man 
and the old woman. "How I wish that I 
could Bee." "How I wish that I could hear." 

John Ravold, William Phlnney and Rexford 
Kendrlck appeared in the prologue, but not In 
the play, and, finally, It may be said that this 
latest of the season's mystery dramas Invites 
comparison with "At 0.45" and "The Crimson 
Alibi." It has not the effective opening of 
the former, nor does II preserve the mystery 
as completely as the latter, but in general 
tone It Is a superior product. LeeS. 



CANTOR'S QUICK STUDY. 

The record study for a song may 
yet be claimed by Eddie Cantor for the 
speed with which he interpolated "I've 
My Captain Working for Me Now" in 
the "Follies." It's an Irving Berlin 
song. Mr. Cantor first heard it at four 
o'clock in the afternoon. He read the 
number a few moments later to Flo 
Zicgfeld. Mr. Ziegfeld asked that Can- 
tor put it on that same night. 

Mr. Cantor sang the song the same 
night, procuring orchestrations mean- 
time from the Irving Berlin company. 



The vaudeville and picture houses 
during the week- reported only fair 
business evenings, and the most of 
them poor business at matinees. / 

All out of town business has almost 
ceased. Whereas some come to the 
city on trains, others live at places 
not touched by the steam roads and 
the jitney tares from these places to 
the city are so high that few are com- 
ing into the city. The theatres of the 
city draw from numerous nearby, cities 
and towns, and lack of patronage from 
these places has caused probably the 
greater part of the decrease in busi- 
ness, v ' 

"THE LOVE CHILD" NEXT. 

The production of a three act drama 
entitled "The Love Child" is underway 
to follow "The Greenwich Village Fol- 
lies" at the Village theatre when the 
musical attraction moves uptown. 
The piece is from the pen of Andre 
Bataijle who wrote "The Thief." 



MISSING VANGIE IS BACK. 

Vangie Valentine, one of the beau- 
ties of the Ziegfeld "Frolic," who 
slipped out of New York about two 
months ago with much attendant pub- 
licity regarding her being missing, is 
back in New York and rejoins the 
"Frolic" next week. 

The "missing" stunt was pulled off 
by Harry Reichenbach, who sent her 
to the coast to appear in "When Bear- 
cat Went Dry." 



PRODUCING "MAGIC GLASSES." 

A. & A. Producing Co. have engaged 
Ray L Joyce and Mary Johnson (Mrs. 
Jack Norworth) for "Magic Glasses." 
The piece is scheduled for production 
in August*. 

Francis Nordstrom is credited with 
the book and music and William Pink- 
ham is staging it. 



A. H. Woods, recovered from an ill- 
ness keeping him confined for 10 days, 
was at his office this week. 



Albany House By Subscription. 

* Albany, N. Y., July 30. 

George S. DeRouville and Uly S. Hill, 
former manager of Harmanus Bleecker 
Halh have secured an option on the 
Second Presbyterian church on Lodge, 
Pine and Chapel streets, and intend 
to erect a theatre for legitimate. The 
theatre will cost $160,000, to be raised 
on popular subscription. 

Wanger Casting Two Play.. 
Walter Wanger has begun casting 
two plays. The first is "The Purple 
Slipper. The second piece is as yet 
unnamed. 



I:. 



as: 






■2% 



LEGITIMATE 



mm 






SHOWS IN NEW YORK AND COMMENT 



NEWS OF THE DAILIES 






15 



mmm 



"A Lonely Romeo," Casino (8th week). 
Moved from the Shubert this week. 
Got a bump with the rest on Monday, 
but picked up Tuesday. Looks. Ilka It 
will get a stronger balcony play at 
the Broadway house. 

"A Voice In the Dark," Republic (1st 
' week). Opened Monday night. No- 
tices great. Would be a knockout It 
It had been brought In later In the 
season. It Ib the third of the mystery 
murder plays now 'running. 

"At 9.45,* Playhouse (Eth week). Going 
along to about $6,600 with cut-rate 
W help. 

«i>mury Midnight Whirl" (38th week). 
Prohibition seems to have cut in a 
little, but the regulars are still playing 
It at 86 a throw for the front table 

"Crimson Alibi," Broadhurst (3d week). 
Doing a corking business and pulling 
upstairs as well as on the lower floor. 
Looks like it will stick into the new 
season and give the other mystery 
plays a run. ■ ••• 

"Follies," Amsterdam (7th week). Still 
at the 827,800 mark, with the run spo- 
ken of as indefinite, although "Hitchy 
Koo" is scheduled for the house In 
September. 

"Five Million," Lyric (4th week), 
Dropped $600 behind the previous week; 
getting about. $8,000. Early in the 
week the show was ahead of the 

grevloiiB week, but the weather turn 
it It. 

"Gaieties of 1919," 44th St. (4th week). Is 
one. of the big musical hits, with the 
takings around $20,000 and standing 
them up nightly. _ \ 

"East Is -West," Astor (42d week). There 
seems to be no let up in/the draw this 
piece has. Topping the $16,00.0 mark 
with regularity and no sign of busi- 
ness dropping. 

"Greenwich villas*. Follies," Greenwich 
Village Theatre (3d week). Will move 
up to Broadway In about two weeks 
Kb With the house still* undecided. Jones' 
interest is 61 per cent. 

"John Ferguson." Fulton (12th week). 
Got a little something over $6,300 last 
week, which shows a profit for Walter 
Wanger. He Is guaranteeing the com- 
pany $2,600 and paying the reat and 
advertising. 

"Utile Journey," Vanderbllt (80th wk.). 
Closes tomorrow night. House to re- 
main dark for a few weeks. 

"Listen Lester," Knickerbocker (34th 
week). Hitting along over the $8,600 
mark and will remain until time for 
the Chicago date in September. ■ 

"LlghtninV Gaiety (60th week). A little 
over $11,000 and sticking strong. 

"La La Lucille," Henry Miller (10th wk.). 
Is getting help from the cut rates in 
the balcony. Getting something over 
$7,000. 

"Monte Crlsto, Jr.," Winter Garden (26th 
week). Will remain until about the 
middle of September, when the "Pass- 
ing Show" comes in. With the Sunday 
night business big the house is over 
the $20,000 mark weekly. 

"Oh, What a Girl," Shubert (1st week). 
Opened Monday night. Notices fairly 
good. Specs have a buy for . four 
weeks. Old-fashioned summer musidal 
show that has some laughs. I 

•Peek-a-Boo," Columbia (llth week). 
Will remain until the opening of the 
regular season at the Columbia and is 
still attracting business. ; £• 

"Royal Vagabond," Cohan & Harris (24th 
week). HAS another four weeks at 
the house, then goes to Chicago. Last 
week's business around 814,000. 

"She's a Good Fellow." Globe - (13th wk.). 
Is to remain until about the early 
part of September, then goes to Boston. 
With the Globe rent paid fori the year 



the show can go along Indefinitely 
without a loss. Got around 88,800. 
"Scandals of 1919," Liberty (9th week). 



Played to over $16,000 last week. Will 
get out In September to make way for 
either a George Tyler piece of the 
Lederer show, T 'Angel Face." 

Spanish Opera Co., Cort Lasted only 
two weeks, closing Saturday. House 
remains dark until Aug. 18, when "A 
Regular Fellow" Is due. 

"39 Bast," Maxlne Elliott (18th week). 
Getting help from the out-rates, but 
still holding on nicely. . mMmtm 

"The Better 'Ole," Booth (42d week). 
For the first week that DeWolf Hopper 
was In the show the gross watt over 
$7,000. Coburn returns as Bill next 

"Three Wise Fools," Criterion (46th 
week). Closes tomorrow , nigh' after 
a long run. Still getting around J7.6O0 
at the finish. - 

"Up In Mabel's Room" Bltlnge (28th 
week). Closes Saturday. Pulled good 
business last week, and this week also 
looked fairly good after the first few 
days. 



,'Aj 

m 



t 



.SHOWS IN FRISCO. 

San Francisco, July 30. 

"Moiiere," with Henry Miller, in its 
second week at the Columbia is going 
so well it will probably eclipse last 
week's good business. 

" Tea for ThrcV at th e Cumn fall- 



ing down this week after doing well 
last week, its first. 

The Casino with the Will King Co. 
and Ackernian & Harris vaudeville con- 
tinues to a very healthy return at the 
box office. The house did $3,600 last 
Sunday, giving four shows on the day. 

"The Brat" by the stock at the Al- 
cazar is doing quite nicely. 

M'NAUGHTON IN "SEE SAW." 

Broadway looks doomed to be full 
of the McNaughton family the coming 
season. Tom McNaughton, who lately 
returned, from England, has engaged 
to appear in "See Saw," which Henry 
W. Savage first produced Wednesday 
at Stamford, Conn. Others in the cast 
are Charles Meakjns and Frank Car- 
ter. The show goes to Boston (Tre- 
mont) Monday for four weeks, 

The other McNaughtons are Charles, 
now with 'The Better "Ole," and Harry 
McNaughton, who is also going with a 
" 'Ole" show next season. 



MARGIN OUT TWO WAYS. 
Max Marcin was reported out of two 
things this week, the Paramount en- 
gagement and the Authors' League. 
One of the' reasons ascribed to his 

' withdrawal from Famous Players-Las-, 
ky was the Shuberts. Marcin is to 
produce on the legit stage the coming 
season, in association with the Shu- 
berts. This aspect when placed before 
Marcin is reported to have resulted 
in his decision although the proposed 
script bureau of the F. P.-L, concern 
may not go through. Marcin and Eu- 
gene Walter were to head it. It may 
be dissolved into other departments 

, of the picture corporation, it is claimed. 
The trouble with the Authors' League 
and Marcin has not been made public. 

DEATHS. 

Earl DavenpWt. 

Chicago, July 30. 
Earl Davenport, press agent of White 
City, was one bf 13 persons killed when 
a huge blimp of the Goodyear Tire & 
Rubber Co. caught fire during an ex- 
hibition flight here last week. The big 
bag tumbled down aflame and crashed 
through the skylight of the Illinois' 
Trust Building, killing nine of the em- 
ployes of the Trust company. Milt 
Norton, a camera man of the Herald 
and Examiner, was also killed. Emit 
De* Recat is at work getting subscrip- 
tions for the widow, of Davenport. 

The wife of Frank F. Mackay, chair- 
man of the relief fund of the Actors' 
Fund, died at her. home at Coytesville, 
N. J., July 21. The deceased was 80 
years of age. Internment was in Pitts- 
burgh. 

SHOWS OPENING. 

The De Wolf Hopper company pre-, 
senting "The Better 'Ole" is to reopen 
Aug. 22 at Newburg, N. Y., and after 
playing Poughkeepsie and Utica will 
head for the big week stands. 

CLARK & RUSH WILL PRODUCE. 

Peter S. Clark and Ed Rush have 
formed a partnership to produce for 
the legitimate next season. The new 
firm's first production will be a four- 
act .Irish-American play by Willard 
Mack, starring Barry McCormack. 

The piece .will be routed over the 
K. and E. time. Rehearsals start Aug. 
11, with an opening set for Sept. 1. 



Incorporate to Produce "Blue Mouse." 

The J. M. W. Corporation has been 
formed by Joe Weber, Harry Carroll 
and Harold. Atteridge to produce 
Weber's forthcoming musicalized ver- 
sion of "The Blue Mouse," featuring 
Bernard Granville. Carroll and Atte- 
ridge as the adaptors will own an in- 
terest in the production, which is ten- 
tatively titled, "The Little Blue Devil." 
Rehearsals begin Aug. 4. 



-Paul Dickey has had his latest play, as 
yet unnamed, accepted .by Cohan A Harris. 

St. John Irvine, author , of "John Fergu- 
son, arrived last week .from Ireland. 

the new production by Wlnchell Smith and 
Johnj Golden Is likely to be named "Thun- 
i der," 1| being a successor to "Llghtnln." 

Franco Du Gregorio, tenor for the Metro- 
politan, accompanied by his wife, arrived In 
New York last week from South America. 

A company Is being formed to play "The 
Five Million" In Chicago while the original 
organization continues In New York. 

Governors of 28 states have consented to 
serve on committee of the Actors' National 
memorial campaign. . 

Phil Barker, the English scenic artist, will 
come to New fork In charge of the scenic 
production of "Aphrodite" at the Century. 

Edward Goodman's play, "Mommer," will 
be produced' at Aebury Park and Long Branch 
during the second week of September. 

Maro Klaw has purchased a tour act com- 
edy entitled "Weaning A Husband," by Dells 
MacLoed, a Baltimore newspaperwoman. : 

Brleux's play, "La Femme Seule," will be 
produced, here during the coming season by 
Henry Neagle under the title of "The Woman 
Alone." . 

London I. Wallick, proprietor of Wallack'a 
Hotel, Is being eued by. hie wife for divorce. 
Mrs. Wallaek charges misconduct with an un- 
identified woman on May '28. 

The opera "Aids" will be sung in the open 
at Sheepshead Bay, Aug. 10. The proceeds 
will, go to the sufferers from the recent earth- 
quake In Italy. -..u, ... 

William Post has been 'engaged to direct 

"Fifty-Fifty,"' which is a musical adaptation 

of William Gillette's old farce "All the Com- 
forts of Home," 

1 Rehearsals started this week for "The Bash- 
ful Hero," the new Harold Brlgbouae farce, 
with Ernest Truex in the title role. The 
premiere will be at the Bijou, Aug, 25, 

Hdwlu Holt, Everett Bltterfleld, Charlotte 
Granville, Margaret Green have been added to 
the cast of "A Regular Feller," which will 
open at the Cort, Aug, 18. 

Marguerite Lawrence and Percy Ames will 
be featured In "Wedding. Bells," a comedy by 
Salisbury Field, which will be produced early 
next season by the Selwyns. \ .-, 

"Half a Widow," a musical comedy with 
book and lyrics by Frank Dupr-.e and ovistc 
by Bheppard Camp, will be produced out of 
town early this month.; 

Lieut, B. C. Hilliam, R. F. A., has been 
engaged by Gus Edwards to write the book 
and lyrics for his forthcoming musical com- 
edy, "The Film Girl." , 

i 

The War Camp Community Service's "Com- 
munity Playhouse" opened July 28, the 
Amsterdam 0. H., under the supervision of 
Marlus McQuffey. 

A. I. Namm Co. have purehnaed the Grand 
o. H.. Brooklyn for $400,000, from the Beta- 
man family. It will be rased and turned Into 
an addition to a department store. 

George Marlon, who staged "Toby's Bow" 
and played the part of the colored butler in 
that piece, has beeen engaged by the Shuberts 
to produce Brward Locke's play, "The 
Dancer." . . • • 

Robert Hunt will have the principal femi- 
nine role In "The Acquittal," Rita Weiman's 
"Cohanlsed" American play which Cohan ft 
Harris will present on Broadway early In the 
autumn. 

Leigh Lovel and his wife, Octavla Kenmore, 
have arrived from London to give a season of 
Ibsen's plays at the Neighborhood Theatre 
early In September. They are known aa el 
ponents of the Ibsen drama In England. 

James Montgomery's "Irene O'Dare,'" origi- 
nally written as a straight comedy, has been 
made Into book and lyric form by that author 
and musicallced by Harry Tlerney. Cohan ft 
Harris will produce It during the season. 

George C. Tyler will stage twelve plays this 
Fall,.., included In which are production (In 
which Laurette Taylor and George Arllss will 
appear. The former la a play by her hus- 
band, J. Hartley Manners. 

Wlnchell Smith and John L. Golden have 
engaged Burr Mcintosh for the part of a 
shouting preacher In their production to be 
presented this month under the title of "Sun- 
rise or "Thunder." 

. The new musical comedy by P, G. Wode- 
house, Rol Cooper Megruc and Raymond Hub- 
bell which Is to be called "Ask the Girls," Is 
to go Into rehearsals this week and mill 
open in New York early In September, 



The complete cast of "Adam and Evo," 
which will bo produced at the Longacre In '■ 
August, includes Ruth Shepley, Adelaide 
Prince, Roberta Arnold, Jean Shplby, Otto 
t Kruger, Courtney FootB, Ferdinand Gotttchal* •- 
and Reginald Mason. • -. : fi^vi 

Complaining, last week that they were llv- ' 
log on an unceasing diet of jazz music, Rose 
Coghjan and other artists from an apart- 
ment In West 42d street, sought relief from 
Magistrate Corrlgan in the Went Side Polios 
Court The complaint wbb made against De 
Bryde's dancing school. ? 

Following the completion of her road tour 
in "The Riddle: Woman," Bertha Kaflch " 
will produce an English adaptation by George 
Foster Piatt: of Jacob Gordln's Yiddish play 
"Sonya Korona," In which MIbb Kallck ap- . '* 
peared more than 15 years ago at the Thaita, ■'• 
New York. » •-.- 

Dorothy Ort, 18 years of age, describing ', 
herself as an aotresa was held by Magistrate 
Simpson In Yorkvllle Court, last weok In $1,000 ' 
ball to await the action of the Grand Jury; 
She pleaded guilty of representing herself to 
Arnold Constable ft Co. ns Gladys Belknap, 
417 Riverside Drive and 'obtaining goods val- ' : 
.ueg.at $88. .. . " .. [,\f v'.y, "' 

In a letter by James T. Powers to Daniel- •' 
Frohman accepting a place on the Profes- 
sional Committee Tn connection with the Ac- 
tors' Nat Ion aj Memorial Day, Mr. Powers 
wrote ;in part "At the death of both my wife 
and myself,, outside of some cash requests, 
the income from.our modest estate will even- 
tually revert to the Actors' Fund of America." - 

dificisMS. 

A VOICE IN THE DARK. ' 

A melodrama In a prologue and three acts, 
by ,.? a lP b . B. Dyar, at the Republic,. July 27. ' 
■-,il A <V?i c !, ,B S? Da I k " J 8 an. Illuminating," 
piece of trick realism which will be heard for : 
a long time.— Herald: • • - . - ; ,-..-■■■; 
The play goes smoothly and briskly from : 
start to finish.— Times, | - . • 

OH; WHAT A GIRL.'.; . 
.A musical comedy the book and lyrics by 
Edgar Smith and Edward Clarlc-score by = 

SSft-^S S&v Jmwn ;* reBDur * $ *<•<, 

.If the amount of applause and laughter at 
the presentation of- a musical farce signifies 
its success, then "Oh. What a Girl f" promises --- 
to enjoy a long run.— rimes'. :.T™-. n .J. 

Both melodious and spontaneous, with a 
wealth of wholesome nonsense, "Oh, What si 
Girl r came to prove, apparently, that the r 
midsummer can bring as delightful a musical ~ 
comedy as the more formal autumnal season • 
in first class theatricals.— Herald. . n-t'M 



M£K' 



" ■■-'T-; : 



judgments: 



Judgments filed in the County Clerk's office. 
The first name Is that of the Judgment debtor.- - 
the second the Judgment creditor, and the 
amount of Judgment. 

■ Dietrich Amusement Co.. Inc. ; Estate - of S , 
Bradlsh Johnson, Inc.; $1,721.09. 

Constance Collier; H. Straus; $188.70. ■ 
:. *4L- *>. . Hm m m M s***' Railway Co. o. . 
N. T.; A. Melnlk, $360. . , ......'.;• 

., H , Ay am B - KMrfmaa ; j. Maopherson ;"'.-., 

fllO.tfl. ■.'•'':.(.•.••■':'•;,...■....'.•.•.'.;:■.', 

j^Herbert H. HaSeltOtt } -Thcs. Healy, IncvH? 

.jMeeWoraft Photo Play Corpi ; % Pearson yS : 

Arthur W. MilletY Thos. Healy, ' Iftci; ' 

BI4.43.' j ■; > ' V: '■■•.=::■ :-." ■■ r.-- ir-V. 

Norman Whiteside; Thomas Healy,. Ine.:V 

?14.07. ' 

Silvio Heln; L. Malbin ; $681.70. . 
s Ig>retto Del Va|e; Musical Courier Co^v- 

Gladys Loftus; Greenwich LItho. Co,, Ind.: 
costs, $110.44. ' • .- ••'.•" ,•■'■"■' 

*M fanning Masters; Wid's Dally, InC.^ : 

Ei^AiSMENTS. 

Ethel Mary Oakland, "Oh, What a Girl." ''■■'• 
Louis Bennlson, "Johnny Get Your Gun/' '■', 
Burford Hampton, "Please Got Married." ; 
May Boley, "Roley-Boley Eyes;" 
Margaret St John, "Too Many Husbands." 
Beatrice Miller, "Too Many, Husbands," 
Phoebe Hunt, "The Acquittal." 
Brown and Evans. "Flo Flo," 
Great Neckelson, ''Merccdee Road Show.'" 
Ethel Mary Oakland. ''Prince Charming." 
Reginald Barlow. "Those Who Walk In ,' 
Darkness." ' 

Consuelo Bailey, "Those Who Walk .in 
Darkness." • 

Amy Rlcard, "Those Who Walk In Dark- 
ness,'' , 

Major Reginald Barlow, "Those Who Walk 
In Darkness." ' . 

"TIN PAJAMAS" DOESN'T SHOW. 

Washington, D. C, July 30. 

"Tin Pajamas," heavily billed to ap- 
pear at the National this week, did 
not show and the house is dark. 

No reason is given. It is understood 
the show is closed. It played last week 
at Atlantic City and was severely crlt- 
icized. 



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STATE-LAKE THEATRE BUILDING 



Cfjicago 
P? Bap 



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By SH'WG 

Just returned from a very—oh, too 
very— brief visit to New York. It is 
a much bigger, liver and more inter- 
esting city than Chicago. I love every 
light that burns on Broadway. I 
think Wolpin's is a better hashery 
even than Pott's Greasy Vest The 
New York office of Variety isn't as 
nice as the Chicago office, but it's 
much busier. I met Jo-Jo, and he 
handed me more laughs than Ernie 
Young. The Joyce Hotel is nicer than 
the Raleigh. . The traffic coppers are 
urbane gentlemen if you buy, a ticket 
to their field day benefit I saw the 
"Follies," paid to get in, sat in the bal- 
cony and never enjoyed a show more. 
I ran into Julius Marx, and he gave me 
a bully briar pipe. I met Helen Mur- 

ghy and done her a dirty trick. Helped 
er buy a ticket back to Chicago. The 
only man I didn't meet in New York 
was Johnnie O'Connor. I visited the 
aquariam and went down to the blintze 
shop on Delancey street I walked 
from 48th down to 42nd on Broadway, 
listened to the sidewalk gab and en- 

1'oyed it even more than I enjoyed 
Lddie Cantor's work in the osteopath 
scene in the "Follies." Wotta town, 
wott town! I love New York as much 
as Jack Lait hates it I gave a thought 
to Broadway, and here it is : Broadway ' 
js the big league lane of the world and 
for every ounce of tin on it there's a. 
ton of gold. 

Francin* Larrimore is a glutton for 

Eunishment. After working for gosh 
nows how many performances in the 
leading feminine role of the longest- 
lived show in Chicago— "Scandal"— 
Fancine went into the chorus of the 
"Passing Show" last Thursday matinee 
on a bet The bet was made with 
John Garrity, who vowed it would get 

fictures and stories in all the papers., 
t did. 

Clarance Washington Williams is 
playing the oddest circuit on theatri- 
cal record. In show business Clarence 
is known as Bert Williams, Jr. The 
little African tenor will be remembered 
locally as having been- one of the fea- 
tured attraction of the Amateur Mid- 
night Frolic which lived a hectic and 
glorious week at the Pastime on Mad- 
ison street early this year. Clarence 
made such a hit at the frolic, which 
was patronized largely by actors, song 
pluggers, coppers, newspapermen and 
night hounds generally, that he made 
valiant efforts to get a route in vaude- 
ville, even going so far as to send in 
his application to the N. V. A His 
efforts were unavailing. Recently, 
while engaged in his favorite pastime; 
of tossing the animated dominoes, he/ 
was arrested, with others of his col-' 
ored brethern. At Central station 
Clarence made the night pleasant for 
the bulls by singing his repertoire, 
which extends from "Mother Machree" 
to "Livery Stable Blues." The cops 
liked his act so much that he wasn't 
booked. Clarence's fame spread from 
police station > to police station, and 
now he's playing the Chicago police 
circuit He travels around in a Prince 
Albert coat, a high, collapsible comedy 
dicer and stand-up collar, singing songs 
for the dicks at a jitney a number. 
Many a night Clarence cleans up as 
high as 85 cents. He gets free chow 
at the Greasy Vest in payment for ' 
impromptu entertainment there, opens 
and closes every show he plays, has 
every bill to himself, pays no commis- 
sions and is saving up for an inch in 
Variety. 



MAJESTIC, CHICAGO. 

Chicago, July 80. 

Emma Carus, more slim than would appear 
creditable, got a fatter reception than would 
seem possible, even In this, her home town, 
the town ahe loves and the town that loves 
her. Monday night the Majestic was Miss 
Cams' home, the audience her guests, and a 
good time was had by all. With the town torn 
by race riots and strike troubles, the folks In 
front were sadly In. need of diversion, and Miss 
Carus, backed by an extraordinarily good bill, 
supplied It. 

Ralph Lohee and Nana Sterling followed the 
Klnograms. This has often been characterised 
as the best opening act In vaudeville. Per- 
haps that's a little too fulsome. But the 
youngsters certainly rank among the best. 
Tbelr athletic work on the bars and rings, 
Ralph's balancing work with the chair and 
accordeon, Nana's youthful charm, all help to 
complete a pleasant, thrilling and peppy 
opener. 

Alleen Stanley, with a crackerjack, unmen- 
tioned pianist assisting, turned to Jazz for aid 
and comfort. Her voice is suited to the blue 
tones. Back of the footlights Alleen looks like 
Ethel Barrymore, but abe sings somewhat on 
the style of Rae Samuels. The song publish- 
ers have furnished her material. Being Jazz, 
she could not have gone to a better source, 
for private enterprise cannot compete with the 
publishers In the matter of Jazs songs. She 
went over surprisingly well. 

Eva Shirley split honors with Fid Gordon's 
band and Al Roth, who outtriBoces Frisco. 
Miss Shirley walked off several times (al- 
though she made but one change of costume, 
and that not particularly a felicitous one) to 
give the musical demons and the dancing fool 
a chance to cavort. Cavort goes for bout the 
dancer and musicians. The fiddler In the band 
particularly deserves more than casual men- 
tion. He does everything to his violin but 
eat It— and then he almost does that, holding 
the bow in his teeth while he plays the In- 
stument. Roth was immense and got perhaps 
the most individual applause of the act; but 
the shabby suggestlveness part of his dance 
hurt his popularity with the better class of 
patrons. Miss Shirley was in magnificent 
voice. Her numbers were well chosen and 
rendered. 

De Leon and Davles went over with a wal- 
lop in the only act with a war atmosphere on 
the bill. At that, the war stuff was confined 
largely to the setting and uniform worn by 
■Walter. The set has been seen here many 
times, but seems to Improve with repetition. 
It is remarkable how much laughter this 
couple can seduce with just a few lines con- 
cerned with the American version of French 
lines. The song, "But We Like It Just the 
Same," with the interpolated satire on "The 
Spv," is a melodious. Intelligent thing. 

Julius Tannen followed Miss Carus and the 
good-looking Walter Leopold. Julius Will 
never go into the shirtwaist business. As far 
as shirts are concerned. Julius' knows how to 
keep his own on, and that lets him out. Hla 
merchandise is words. Talk is what he can 
sell. He not only sells it — he gives it away. 
Tannen in a terrific hit That is remarkable, 
because the stage Tannen is intelligent — so 
much so that he might even be termed high- 
brow. 

T. Roy Barnes and Bessie Crawfoftl were a 
furore. The house rocked. It had to. Roy 
paraded the aisles with a long musket, and 
dared anybody to walk out When he pre- 
sents arms and ordered applause, he got it. 
At that he didn't need the musket His double- 
bsrreled, hard-bore personality took care of 
that with Miss Crawford rendering able and 
copious assistance. She was born to play 
straight to Roy's comedy. 

Tbey stayed for the pleasant novelty offered 
by the Gascolgnes. Swing. 

STATE-LAKE, CHICAGO. 

Chicago, July 30. 

Leona Le Mar opened here Just a week too 
late. For the past week the entire city had 
been agitated as never before by the myster- 
ious disappearance of a 6-year old child named 
Janet Wilkinson. Thomas Fitzgerald, night 
watchman at the Virginia hotel, had been ar- 
rested In connection with the case. Pages 
were devoted to the case. The city editor of 
the Herald and Examiner Saturday called up 
Variety's office and asked if any of the vaude- 
ville spiritualists were In town. The idea was 
to have the spiritualist go Into a seance and 
attempt to tell the ■ city where Janet or her 
body was. Variety promised to put the news- 
paper Into touch with Miss Le Mar, who was 
due Monday. Sunday morning Fitzgerald 
confessed to the murder of the child, and 
showed the police where her body was located 
— In the basement of the child's home on B. 
Superior street Thus Miss Le Mar lost the 
most enchanting possibility for valuable pub- 
licity ever placed before an act. Notwith- 
standing, there were sufficient number of 
people In the audience, anxious concerning 
their lost bracelets, to help Miss Le Msr get 
over nicely. 

Mahoney and Auburn opened with a Juggling 
act Tbey Juggled gags as well as other 
things, and aided by a good appearance, 
started the performance brightly. Betty Bond 
came No. 2, with a song cycle of character 
songs, with special scenery and material. She 
registered best with "I'm - A Jass Baby." 

Jlmmle Savo, a little fellow In a comedy 
makeup, needed a lot of assurance to hop on 
single with nothing but dances and gags to 
sustain him, but he too had the goods and got 
over. Lloyd and Christie are doing an act 
which seems to be practically the same one 
that Avellng and Lloyd used to do. Improved 
with new bright chatter. Leona Le Mar 
doted. 

MsUh 



RIOTS HURT BUSINESS. 

Chicago, July 30. 

Chicago by day and Chicago by night 
is in a fever because of an exceptional 
condition bronught about by a street 
car strike and the worst race riots in 
the history of this city. ■ 

After 'parleying for weeks the street 
car men went on strike Tuesday morn- 
ing, tying the city pretty well in a 
knot. With cries of "To Hell with the 
public," 15,000 street car and elevated 
railway trainmen quit work. _. 

On the south side of town, thou- 
sands of whites and blacks, armed, 
fought the bitter fight of race hatred. 
By Tuesday night over 30 had been 
killed and 200 wounded, white and 
black. The state militia was mobilized 
and four thousand guardsmen are pa- 
trolling the affected area, attempting 
to bring back law and order. 

Show business on the south side has 
been thoroughly demoralized. People 
are afread to go to theatres.. The police 
are considering orders closing the the- 
atres in sections inhabited by whites 
and blacks, fearing any sort of as- 
semblage. 

Business was hurt downtown by the 
strike, which prevented the majority 
of people from coming to the loop ex- 
cept in automobiles. Taxicabs were 
inadequate to meet ten per cent of the 
demand. Only auto owners could nav- 
igate the city. The only rail trans- 
portation not affected were the sub- 
urban lines. Jitney busses did a land- 
office business, but theatregoers were 
not among the patrons. The general 
situation brought about by the riots 
and strikes is so serious that Governor 
Lowden, who had left Springfield for 
a trip to Burlington, la., stopped short 
and made his way promptly to Chicago. 

The street car strike comes within a 
week or two of the opening of the 
season here, and will undoubtedly have 
a bad effect on the new season, unless 
it is settled quick. The unions appear 
to be in control of radical elements, 
and the situation is expected to get 
worse unless a prompt settlement is 
made. / . , 

From the show point of view the sit- 
uation is further complicated by the 
threat of the musicians' union to go 
out on strike Thursday of this week 
unless their demands for a 25 per cent 
increase is not met at once. Commit- 
tees of the union have been in daily 
conference with the Theatre Managers' 
Association and every effort will be 
made to avoid a strike at this time. 



INCREASE FOR MUSICIANS. 

Chicago, July 30. 

Negotiations are pending between 
the Chicago Federation of Musicians 
and the Theatre Managers' Association 
for a 25 per cent, increase in the scale 
of all musicians in all local theatres. 
The present scale runs from $27.50 up 
in the pit. — 

Harry J. Ridings, speaking for the 
managers, and Joe Winkler for the 
musicians, both stated no trouble was 
expected. .' 

The theatres a re -prepared to grant 
the increase, and the new scale will 
probably go into effect next month. 



CROSS SUCCEEDS GRANVILLE. 

*"■* Chicago, July 30. 
Negotiations have been in progress 
whereby .Wellington Cross is to suc- 
ceed Bernard Granville as the featured 
leading man of "Honeymoon Town" at 
the La Salle. Granville leave's next 
week to go in Joe Weber's musical 
version of Clyde Fitch's "Blue Mouse," 
to be known as "The Little Blue 
Devil." "Honeymoon Town" expects 
to stick at the La Salle until Sept 21, 
if arrangements can be made with 
Comstock & Gest, lessees of the house. 
"Tea for Three" is booked to come 
into the house Sept. 23. In the mean- 
time Louise Mink has succeeded Helen 
Bolton in the piece. 



By JACK LAIT 

The name of this column had better 
be changed. Chicago has no nights 
now. Since the frisk and seizure law 
began its insidious operations, you 
could shoot a big Bertha up and down 
Randolph street at high midnight and 
do nothing beyond waking up a dog 
asleep in a doorway which was once 
the- threshold of a teeming emporium 
for beer and cheer. ; 

• It is hard to say whether this helps 
or hurts the box offices. It has pulled 
up trade at the outlying movies, but it 
is a question whether libating, with the 
attendant elements of supper parties 
and the like, were not attached, skin 
and bone, to the theatre-going idea. 
Prohibition will make money more 
available to the middle and . poorer 
classes undoubtedly, but may. it not 
prove hurtful to divorce. An evening 
down town from the associated pas- 
times and make attendance at a per- 
formance stand alone and unaided as 
the sole attraction to cajole folks out 
of their houses to make the trip down 
and return. 

That it will finally murder the scalp- 
ing craft is already sure. One of the 
main factors which directed the rubles 
into the talons of the speculators and 
the dinner which turned on short no- 
tice into "let's take in a show" chan- 
nels, and now so few dine out that 
the main cafes are desolate and des- 
perate. 

Chicago is a town of long distances. 
Most citizens live miles from the Loop. 
There is no concerted and concentrated 
loafing and teeming around the theatre 
centers such as is obvious about 
Broadway. Except for the floaters, 
who are comparatively few, almost 
everybody in the busy portions of the 
town after business hours is there for 
some definite purpose. Cafe gayeties 
always stood,as one of the main pur- 
poses until the panic came on. Most 
people have some wet stuff corralled 
at home, making a definite purpose for 
not coming down town, while the 100 
per cent enforcement against liquor 
sales has removed the chief incentive 
for coming down town. In "wine, 
woman and song," the playhouse typi- 
fies "song," now that the charmed trin- 
ity is a bust, wine having seceded from 
the! union, is woman to survive alone 
among the primary delights of life. 
Long may she marceL 

HARDY REPRESENTING TYLER. 
Chicago, July 30. 
When the Blackstone theatre re- 
sumes its season, Aug. 31, with Har- 
riet Ford and Harvey 0*Higgins* "On 
the Hiring Line," a new manager will 
be in charge of the theatre. Walter 
McCloud will be succeeded by Guy 
Hardy, former manager of the Play- 
house, . which was leased this week 
for pictures. Hardy will not only man- 
age the theatre, but will act as repre- 
sentative for George C Tyler, who 
has practically taken -over the entire 
booking of the house for his own at- 
tractions, although the theatre will 
continue under the lease and general 
management of Harry J. Powers. 
' Prior to being manager of the Play- 
house, Hardy was manager 'of the 
Auditorium. As Tyler's representative, 
Hardy will have charge of the Chicago 
engagements of George Arliss, Laur- 
ette Taylor, Alexandra Carlisle, Alfred 
Lunt, Lynn Fontaine and other stars. 



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Ban Francisco, July 80. 

There la * good summer bill at the Orpheum 
this week with/ a number of singing turns, 
both popular and classical, lnter-mlxed with 
a food measure of comedy. Grace La Hue, 
who la filling the second week of her engage- 
ment, was easily the class of the show. Misa 
La Rue sang a number of songs, every one 
of which went over big. Her handsome gowns 
and fine showmanship are large assets to the 
act. 

lone Pa store, a lyric soprano. Is making her 
vaudeville debut. The young woman baa a 
finely trained voice and sings a number of 
standard classical selectlbns rather well, but 
she lacks the vaudeville requisites necessary 
to put them across. Nevertheless she scored, 
because of -her local popularity. 

Nelson and Chain stopped the show with 
their "use Tour Own Judgment," a scream- 
ingly funny ■ burlesque. From the time of 
their entrance oh velocipedes until tn.elr fin- 
ish with a burlesque of a Cleopatra dance, 
the audience never ceased • to laugh. Bob 
Murphy and Elmore White went over big with 
popular numbers adroitly handled with an 
original twist, some good.' patter and sew 
sounding subtitles. 

"The Reckless Eve," a musical comedy with 
Esther Jnrrett, Cecil Summers and Dewey 
and Rogers, is playing a return engagement 
The scenery has been brushed up, with new 
costume* and there are a number of changes ' 
in the cioruo, all of which have helped to 
make the act more pleasing and the result 
is it closes most successfully. 

Delro, billed as the original master of the 
piano accordeon, la one of the most popular 
acta on the circuit and this is the fifth time 
he has been here this season, and according 
to the way he was received, he could remain 
here Indefinitely. Theodore Bekefl in Russian 
and other dances, who waa one of the hold- 
overs from last week, has made several alight 
changes in the opening of the act. The pro- 
gram dosed with Hearst Weekly. 

Jack Jotofte. 

PANTAGES. 

San Francisco, July 80. 

There la a well rounded show at Pantagea 
this week, headed by the Kelly Field Players, 
from Kelly Field, Texas, as the headline at- 
traction. The act was booked by Alex. Pan- 
tagea personally and la making a transcon- 
tinental tour of the United States, after bav- . 
log played all the army camps throughout 
tbe country. There are 12 soldiers and they 
put on a musical revue They received a big 
reception. 

The Four Renneee offered a clever singing 
and dancing act of the various nations appro- 
priately costumed. The dancing Is done by 
three of the quartet, while the other member 
is a singer of ability. Joe Darcy, a black- 
face comedian, although slow In getting 
started, closed big with bis well sang songs. 
Nolan and Nolan did exceedingly well with a 
good line of songs and some breasy talk. The 
girls had some special topical numbers which 
were appreciated by the audience. 

Sam and Ada Beverly with their offering 
"Mirthful Moments of Musical Comedy" were 
a big success. The man's Swede character 
number being exceptionally good, they also 
had some clever talk which helped them 
along considerably. The team's work Is above 
the circuit's average 

Anita Dial and her monkeys opened and 
the latter are some of the beat behaved monks 
that have been seen here for many years. 

- A regular screen comedy and newa Weekly 
closed the bill. Jack Josephs. 

HIPPODROME. 

San Francisco, July 30. 

There is a nicely balanced bill at the Hip- 
podrome, containing good variety. Morrell'a 
Toy Shop opened, a well trained lot of dogs 
which axe put through a fast routine by an 
energetic master who towards the end waa 
inclined to treat them rough. 

Knight and Qatl are a mixed team of singers 
who did well. The man has an excellenet ten- 
or voice and was the big applause winner. 
Mae and Betty Earle made a hit and got 
over many laughs with their nut stuff and 
general breesy talk, tbey finished strong with 
^i good double nut number. 
. George Hall scored big in the next to closing 
spot with his monolog, comedy songs and 
recitations. Alex Rull and Dolls gave a fine 
exhibition of ballroom and Russian dancing", 
the latter by Rull. The turn went over to a 
big finish. 

"Leave It to Susan," with Madge Kennedy, 
waa the film feature. Jack Jceeph*. 

CASINO. 

San Francisco, July 80. 

Plenty of novelty is found in the vaudeville 
portion of this week's bill despite the fact 
that there are three silent acts on the pro- 
gram. These three turns, however, offer a 
wide variety of entertainment in their respec- 
tive line*. 

The particular bright spot on the bill Is 
Jack and Eva Arnold offering "Bright 
Moments of Musical Comedy" in number two 
Position, a handicap that seemed to have no 
apparent effect on the results produced by 
the couple. They are a strikingly attractive 
team and offer a pleasing routine of patter 
and songs, ths latter having restricted flavor. 
A comedy bit by the man, a travesty on a 
parson proved a big feature of the turn. Ar- 
thur Davis opened the entertainment on a 
slaek wire His work, though sot startling 
at spy point of the act, la done with eaae and 
■race and he finishes to a fair amount of ap- 
plause, which would nave been greater hid 
be not stalled before making bis exit. 

Paul* Armstrong and Neville follow til 



Arnolds in hand-to-hand balancing. The note- 
worthy feature, of the turn Is that the girl, 
presenting a frail appearance, does all the 
understanding. The act oloaea with tbe man 
leaping from a bounding net over a piano 
to a hand-to-hand catch. Versatility to the 
prime factor of the offering of the Bally-Hoo 
Trio which consists of two men and a woman. 

The opening shows the exterior of a circus 
tent, then goes to full stage for acrobatic 
and contortion Which to the nucleus of the 
turn. The acrobatlo member also displays a 
fairly good tenor voice. The contortionist 
doea work that borders on the uncanny, but 
very good work. Nat Man and Marie Malloiy 
talked and sang their way into favor. They 
are a capable couple and if tbey eliminated 
the. raciest part of their routine their suc- 
cess would be more pronounced. The WIs- 
tergarden Four close the vaudeville bill. Con- 
sidering their selection of eoogs, which la 
noticeable by the lack of ripe hits, the boys 
did very well. 

The King offering "Town Frolics," a title 
that runs true to musical comedy form by 
having nothing to do with the show, la pre- 
sented In two scenes this week. As usual, 
the numbera - and bits are put over In ex- 
cellent style. A feature number of tbe show 
to 1 Found the End Of the Rainbow," led by 
Nan Lewis, one of the chorus. Despite nn- 
usually sunny weather long Uses continue 
dally in front of the Casino. 

Jack Joseph*. 

SAN FRANCISCO NOTES. 

Jack and Faye Smith, while playing the 

Pantages in Oakland, lost considerable wear- 
ing apparel from their room at the St Mark* 
Hotel, and according to the report received 
scant - codrtesy- from tbe management, and 
were compelled to briog auit for jocoi er y. 
jack Manloo, of Harris and Manlon, also re- 
port a very unpleasant experience at this 
hotel. — 

The Jim Post Musical Comedy Co. 
Ing a house In the Mission District 
gagement at the Wigwam to likely. 

Harold Reld, formerly assistant treasurer 
of the Curran, and lately an exhibitor of 
•feature pictures, has purchased the newstands 
In the Palace and St Francis hotels. 

According to the gossip around the Casino, 
the Columbia Theatre In Oakland to dupli- 
cating the Will King productions. The seme 
show, being produced, bit for bit and number 
for number, a week following its presentation 
on this aide of Bay. 



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Wallace Reld made a personal appearance 



at the Imperial last week, hla appearance In- 
cluded violin and ssxaphone playing. 

Merry n Le Roy, of Le Roy and Cooper, at 
present with the Famoua-Laaky Players at 
Hollywood, will shortly return to vaudeville. 

Nora Kelly and Nat Goldstein, who have 
been playing the Orpheum circuit, have left 
for a four weeks' trip to the mountains. , 

Doc Tryon la back in his office after a month 
at Santa Crua. 

Fox Benson Trio, playing ths Aokerman ft 
Harls theatres, have contracts for a Moss- 
Stoll tour, opening st Blsokpcol, England, 
some time In December. 

Burton Myers, formerly manager of the local 
Pantagea house, and recently assistant man- 
ager at the Palace-Hip in Seattle, la now man- 
aging Pantages Theatre In Minneapolis, . 

Harry Bines has received an offer to loin 
the Eltinge show to replace Sidney Grant who 
left the show last week. 

Irving Aokerman returned from an extended 
visit in the Bast tost Friday. 

Paul Locke's ."Shlmmle Dancers," appear- 
ing as a special attraction on the T. ft D. 
Circuit of picture theatres, and proving a 
box office attraction, will In all probability 
repeat the tour. 

Danny Simmons, B. S. Moss' booking man- 
ager, wss is Ssn Francisco last week. 

Billy White, formerly assistant manager at 
the Hippodrome and Caalno theatres, to 
scheduled for a berth at the Falaoe^Hlp in 
Seattle » 

Lester Fountain to resting here, pending 
assuming the management of one of the 
Ackerman ft Harris Hippodromes. Juat what 
bouse be will be assigned to has not been de- 
cided ss yet 

WInfleld Blake is rehearsing a girl act to 
appear at the Orpheum In Oakland next week 
in conjunction with the feature picture, "Oh, 
Boy." The act will have twelve girla and 
three men. 

Eugene Levy, theatrical manager of 
Seattle, who was married to Vivian May 
Levy, daughter of a retired capitalist of 
Seattle, July 20, waa here last week with his 
bride. 

Carter and his maglo show will be the at- 
traction at the Te Liberty in Oakland the 
week of Aug. IT. 

. The east of principals for the' Hearst 
Greek Theatre production of "Miriam, Sister 
of Moses," to be staged on the nights of 
Friday and Saturday sext week, will include 
Ruth St Denta and Ted Shews In ths lead- 
Ins roles. Tbe remainder of the out as tfl« 



BOOKING FOR ANTIPODES. 

San Francisco, July 30/ 
Ben J Fuller, the Australian vaude- 
ville magnate who arrived here last 
week from 'the Antipodes via Van- 
couver, on the Niagara, intends to be 
absent from Australia for a year. «Fol- 
lowing; a visit to Los Angeles this 
week he left for Chicago thence to 
New York from which port he sails , 
for Europe on the Mauretania early in ' 
September. 

During the trip Fuller will not only 
arrange for the Australian appearances 
of vaudeville turns, but he also intends 
' to book several big melodramas of the 
old Sullivan, Harris & Woods stand- 
ard. - For the presentation of these 
offerings, he already has three com- 

Eanies organized. These companies 
ave been touring his theatres for the 
past year in repertoire. He expects, 
however, to engage several principals 
while in America for work in the bet- 
ter class of legitimate shows which 
it is his intention to produce -on his 
return and for which there appears to 
be a demand for in'Australia. N 

Fuller states that the income tax 
levied on professionals is not as large 
as has heretofore and -that the present 
tax is now being revised, a statement 
of which he expects, to receive shortly. 
This statement will be given Variety; 
for publication immediately on receipt 
Fuller is accompanied on his tour by 
his wife, two daughters and his eigh- 
teen year eld son, A. B. Fuller. 

During the voyage over here, Mrs. 
Fuller and their daughjer Fay,- seven 
years old, were stricken with pneu- 
monia, but since their arrival here 
both have fully recovered. 

YIDDISH PLAYERS ORGANIZE. 

San Francisco, July 30. 
The Grossman Yiddish Players have 
organized a stock company which will 
remain here indefinitely, playing stock 
in Yiddish, with interpolated songs in 
English. For the present, the company 
will appear on Friday and Saturday 
nights at the Savoy. Irving Gross- 
man is the juvenile and L. Karp 
handles the comedy. 

Albambra Closed for Alteratiins. 
San Francisco, July 30. 

The Alhambra, one of San Fran- 
cisco's first picture houses, closed Sat- 
urday night to undergo a complete 
process of rejuvenation. The house 
will be completely remodeled and re- 
decorated and will be reopened in two 
weeks as a first run house 

As the house is owned by Universal, 
it is thought likely the Universal pic- 
tures will be the policy. A contest it 
to be conducted by the Daily News 
for the selection of a new name for. 
the house, the winner drawing a prise 
of $50. 

Oakland Bars the Shimmle. 

San Francisco, July 30. 
The Oakland City Council, after 
hearing arguments by society women 
and social' workers, voiced unanimous 
and official disapproval of the "Shim- 
mie" and instructed the city attorney 
to prepare an ordinance banning the 
dance 



Cunning's Touring Show. 

San Francisco, July 30.' 
Cunning, the magician, who has bees 
on the retired lisf'for the past few 
months, is reorganizing a show thst 
will tour via auto into Portland, with 
a Canadian tour to follow. 



Griffin's Minstrels Start Rehearsals, 
San Francisco, July 30. 
Sam Griffin's premier minstrels, re- 
cently organized to tour the better 
class theatres in the West, started re- 
hearsals last Saturday. Eugene De 
Bell will be one of the principals. 
">^»""— — ^— «» 
Iowa: Jessica Davie Nahl, Marie L. Meyers, 
Malcolm Morley, Ollmore Brown, W. 0. 
Plunkett Charles- Birnbaum. Howard Millar, 
Harold A. Black, Richard Hall and A. T. 



SHOWS IN SAN FRANCISCO. 

ALCAZAR.— "The Brat" (stock) with Wal- 
ter P. Richardson & Belle Bennett 

CASINO.— Will King Co. (10th week) A 
a H. & W. V. A. Vaudeville. 

COLUMBIA.— Henry Miller ft Blanche 
Batea In "Mollere" (2d week). 

CURRAN.— "Tea tor Three" (2d week). 

MAJESTIC— Del Lawrence Stock Co. . 

PRINCESS.— Bert Levey Vaudeville 

WIQWAM.— A H. & W. V, A, Vaudeville. 

CHICAGO NOTES. 

Irving Mack, publicity agent has been ap- 
pointed to handle the press work far the 
Capital Film Co, of New Tork and Chisago, 
working from the Chicago office 

Bam Oeraon has returned from a flying trip 
to New Tork. Anxiety to take a look at ate 
sew three weeks' old daughter— his lath 
grandchild, by the way— cut his trip abort 




Lou Macloon, director of the annual 
Show at Wichita, Kansas, waa in Chicago 
last week looking for attractions. • 

When it arrives at the Studebaker on Aug. 
17, "Take It From Me" will bave eubitltoied 
Zee Barnett for Vera Mlohalena In the prin- 
cipal singing role. 

Betty Preaoott formerly a memoes of Ellsha 
Cook's company at the Philistine theatre, has 
gone East and Joined the east of "The Little 

Journey," succeeding OUda VaraaL ./_. ..... jg , ^ 

Clarence Lute, formerly with "Going TJp, M 
and Beatrice Newman, known In local caba- 
rets, have formed a partnership In a tarn, 

Harland Baboock (Bab), newspaperman, la 
handling the publicity for the La Salle and 
Princess theatres. 

Joe Bennett Is acting as Chicago representa- 
tive of Irving Berlin. 



The 1 
funeral 



. V. A. contributed 1100 toward the 
of George Sehlndler. 



Pete Mack came on laat week from Maw 
Tork: He ia making his headquarters in Tom 
Powell's office. _ j 

Art Bsberg baa returned from two weeks* 
rest is the woods of Wisconsin, where they 
dance till midnight and will resume hi* 
duties as treasurer of the Blackatone thetttw 
as soon as the house opens next month. 

Charlie Tatea, former office boy to Jak* 
Silas, has been promoted to assistant to 
Sammy Tlahman of the Thlelen circuit Ho 
is now the youngest of the youngsters on the 

association floor. 

Ray Conlln and Stan and Mae Larel have 
been booked over the pan time by Allen Sum- 



Charlie Dillingham waa In town this week. 
it I* reported his visit waa for the purpose of 
negotiating to take George Ledererw "Asset 
Faoe" to New Tork. 

"ANGEL" IS DEVIL 

Chicago, July 30. 
In a recent Variett it was stated 
that Harry . Blanchard, theatre-owner 
of Davenport, la., who financed "Ho- 
neymoon Town," had "angeled** the 
show. Mr. Blanchard, arriving in 
town, saw the item and immediately 
^registered a complaint "After being 
in show business for so many years 
I resent being called an angel," he said. 
"I'm a devil—especially in my own 
home town." 



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And So They War* Married. 

. Chicago, July 30. 
Joe Marine, assistant manager of 
the Chicago office of Waterson, Berlin 
& Snyder, was married this, week to- v- 
Lillian Bernard, featured singing come-; 
dienne at the Edelweiss Garden Revue, 
deftly turning his annual vacation' into 
a honeymoon period. 



Orpheum, Sioux Falls, Sold., 

Chicago, July 30. 
Eugene Reillv and W. I. Thompson, 
bankers of Sfoux Falls, S. D., have 

Fiurchased the Orpheum theatre there 
rom Salari Bros. 



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Hatton Premier la Chicago. 
. ■ Chicago, July 30. 

The Hatton's new play "Madame 
Sappho," written as a stellar vehicle 
for Grace Valentine, wilt see its met- 
ropolitan premier in Chicago. It Is 
booked to open at the Olympic Aug: 
24. 

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(ON THE ROAD TO SUNSHINE LAND) 

'By J. KF (RN BREN NAN, PAUL CI/NNINGHAM and B1ERT RULE 

a nother big ??ono hit : 't-J ''ifWV. CT #k ^•VbVJV/I' <| ~| C5" 

A INI atu ra I Dou b I e Ror ' Tw ~ * L° *±7« °, °' r ' s or 



The Gates Of Gladness 

(Oa The Road To Sunshine Land) 



Brlfbttr <*"•* 



By J. KEIRN BRENNAN 

PAUL CUNNINGHAM 

* BERT RULE 




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road to Sun- abioa L»nd!____ You haw Laalt 



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Professional Copies and Orchestrations in Six Keys— G ( b to d), A b (c to e b), B b (d to f ), C (e to g), D (f to a) 
E b (g to b b). QUARTETS for All Voices. BAND ARRANGEMENTS, all of which can be obtained from any 

of the offices in QUR CO AST-TO-CO AST SERVICE. 



H. ROM JlaOLURE AL. WIRTH 

St. Patrt. Minn. Cltvttand, 0. 

Enaorium Maroaatila Oa. 4th ajuj Pnapaet sti. 



BRYANT M. 'RHINO 



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VARIETY 



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SOME SMASHING SENS A TIONAL SUCCESS i 




OF IVIilNJ 



By CLYDE HAGER* and. t WALTER GOODWIN. Acknowledged by all singers to be the greatest 

"MOTHER " song of the present time. A beautiful, sympathetic waltz melody, and a lyric 

that is bound to reach the heart of every man, woman and child in your audience. 



That Wonderful Mother Of Mine 

CLYtfKH/fofcR WALtER Goodwin 

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, REFRAIN Stout* <ud ttntort* 



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Copies and 



in All Keys Now Ready 



-take: advantage OF" our ooast*to~coast serviqe 



M. WITMARK & SONS 



AL COOK, 1562 Broadway, N. Y., next to Palace Theatre 
(NEXT TO PALACE THEATRE) 



AL. BROWNE 

8M F rendu*, Cal. 
*M PanUiH Bids. 

BABE NATHAN 

Lot Aaealee, Gal. 

Ntaraa Theatre Bide. 



TH08. i. Q.UIQLEY 

Chicago, III. 
aurlrt Theatre Bldf. 

JACK CROWLEY 

PimMmm, R. I. 

II BetlMV SL 



ED. EDWARDS 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
U South 9th 8t. 



JOS. L. MANN 

Dearer, Cola. 

420 Barth Block 



JACK LAHEY 

floaton, Maaa. 

Zll TrtMOqt St. 



HAL at. KINfl 

KantM GMy. Ha. 

Qiltty Theatre Bld|. 




SYDNEY KLEIN 

25 Whltinora Ait*. 

Sail Lake City, Utah 

00C HOWARD 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

S2I Mala St. 



H. ROSS MeCLURE 

81. Paul, Minn. 
Emporium Mercantile 0*. 

BARNEY HASAN 

Seattle. Wait). 
000 Meatallu Bldf. 



AL. WORTH 
ClrreUad, 0. 



BILLY HALLET 

St. Leule, Ma. 

421 Helta** Bldf. 



BRYANT H. FREUND 

Pltiabureh. Pa. 
(47 Fifth Ara. 

MIKI MaCARTNY 

Mlnaeaeolle, Mltl. 
117 Faautw Bldf. 



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NEW ACTS 



'•A .1 

THIS WEEK 



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Mumford and Stanley. 
Song«. 

15 Mini.; One. 
American Roof. 

• Both the men deserved the hit they 
earned. They have the goods, to use a 
local term. As a result the house 'Was 
loath to see them leave, causing a stop- 
page of the show's procedure. The 
straight opens with "Goodbye Fprever" 
only to be interrupted by the pseudo- 
stage hand fishing for a lone jitney on 
the stage. Some argument chatter, 
which resulted in the orchestra berat- 
ing the actor for bothering them too 
much, with which they leave the pit, 
leaving the duo alone for some corking 
harmony without Orchestral accom- 
paniment. The numbers employed are 
old stand-bys. The applause is the 
cue for the "wise crack," nevertheless 
true, to the effect that "the old songs 
are made to sing; the new ones are 
made to sell." The rest of their vocal 
routine came in for merited applause 
and they departed the hit of the even- 
ing. Big time for them. ) 

;% . AbH. 

Edmunds and Siege!. 
Songs and Dances. 
15 Mint,; One. 

Harlem O. H. . '■■ : .^^£u. :..f:", V. 
(Here is a team that' wbri'tflb, at least 
not for the small-time houses around 
New York. They were almost laughed 
off the stage at the Harlem Monday 
night. It is a man and woman com- 
bination in a flirtation bit followed by 
a couple of songs by each, but the 
dialog and numbers mean nothing at 
all. For an encore they are offering a 
Bowery dance with the tough boy and 
girl a la Rock and White. This is by 
far the best thing in the act but it 
comes along too late to do them any 
good. Neither of the members of the 
team has a voice and their dancing 
just gets them by. Fred. 



Jimmie Huisey and Co.' 

"Move On" (Comedy). . 

35 Mint.; Fall Stage (Special Set). 

Brighton. 

Now in its third week the new Jim- 
mie Hussey production, depicting the 
"Shimmie Police Station" under the 
title of "Move On" looks like a staple 
headline turn. This because of its orig- 
inal outlines and the grade of talent 
exposed in its staging. It carries a 
good comedy theme wherein Hussey is 
fired from the police force and opens 
a police station of his own. It's fitted 
up in exquisite style with a jazz band 
in uniforms helping to fill the stage. 
Flo Lewis is brought in charged with 
murdering the shimmie. She is given a 
shimmie trial with Hussey presiding as 
judge. Meanwhile she is entertained 
by the band, Win. Worsley and Hussey 
himself. Hussey with three numbers 
, practically stopped the show. There 
is considerable comedy talk passed be- 
tween Worsley and Hussey, but the 
foundation of the production settles 
around the shimmie. Miss Lewis' shim- 
mie is very mild, very, very mild, but 
she looks good and goes through her 
comedy explanation of the murder in 
excellent shape. It's a corking revue, 
unique in construction, original in idea 
and well played. Hussey should make 
headline connections with ease in this 
turn, but if vaudeville doesn't want it, 
it seems fit for a spot in any musical 
show. At the Brighton it scored a hit 

Wvnn. 



Emma and Boyd. i ., 

Trapeze. 

9 Mint.; Three.' 

American Roof. 

'Both women enter in evening wraps, 
and strip to pretty loose fitting romp- 
ers for some heat dual work on a 
double trapeze, accompanied by a fast, 
catchy score. The usual iron jaw rou- 
tine and whirling stunts complete the 
act; also very wisely accompanied by 
some catchily arranged numbers. A 
sort of dance in the air is the piece 
de resistance of the turn, wherein one 
woman pantos, with one foot rapped 
around the suspended tape-line. Good 
small time opening act, as it stands. 
i Abel. 



James and Bessie Aiken. 
Contortionist and Roller Skating. 
11 Mini.; Full (Special). 
Harlem O. H. 

A small time opening act with the 
girl doing all of the work on the roll- 
ers. The man is a fairly clever con- 
tortionist. The scene is in a cabaret 
with the man a waiter and the girl 
one of the entertainers. The idea 
rather fits for the work done. A couple 
of bits of dialog here and there fit 
fairly well. Several of the numbers 
that the girl handles are old. 

\Fred. 



Faber and McGowan. , 
Song, Dance and Cross-fire. 
15 Mint.; One. 
American Roof. '" 

Opening with the conventional flirta-, 
tion bits, lead up to, however, by a new 
and novel method with a compass as 
the medium, they cross-fire and sing 
away to good returns. When it came 
to a double stepping number later on, 
they seemed to let down a little. The 
turn is excellent as far as its type goes. 
Fabcr and Brooks have a sure-fire 
sketch, thanks to clever material, per- 
sonality and personal ability. , Abel. 

IF YOU DON'T ADVERTISE IN VARIETY— 
DON'T ADVERTISE 



Charlotte Worth. 

Songs. 

12 Mias.| One. . 

23rd Street. 

Miss Worth owes some of her suc- 
cess to the good material her special 
song writer has provided her with. 
The first three numbers are of this 
type, consisting of an "applause" ditty, 
a "flirtation" panto, and a phone— East 
is West number, with the inevitable 
"blue" punch interpolations, which one 
cannot deny are sure fire for bringing 
returns. An encore was the oppor- 
tunity for the rendition of Irving Ber- 
lin's latest "mother" song, far superior 
to the. already trillion songs of this 
type on the market This number 
earned her another encore, coming 
back with "Sahara," an inane Oriental 
number, as far as lyric is concerned. 
Having proved her Worth (terrible 
pun), she merited enthusiastic ap- 
plause. Miss Worth is worthy of at- 
tention by the bookers. AbtL 



Van Bergen and Josephine. 
Piano Act 
12 Mins.; One. 
American Roof. 

The man opens with a "Mandalay" 
vocal number to good returns accom- 
panied by Josephine, presumably, on 
a grand piano. Her soprano solo 
brought similarly excellent approba- 
tion. The man fared exceedingly well 
with a ballad, "Oh What a Gal Was 
Mary," which would deserve to be a 
hit, were it not "lifted" from Ernie 
Ball's famous, "All the World Will Be 
Jealous of Me," as far as the catchy 
strains are concerned, at certain in- 
tervals in the number. His rendition, 
announced as a "reading" of Robert 
W- Service's latest poem, 'The Fool," 
also came in for approval However, 
the theme is too sombre for entertain- 
ment. A double sent them off well 

Abel 

Tuck and Claire, '..^0 

Acrobatic, 

15 Mins.; One. , 

Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

Two men. Tuck (formerly Nip and 
Tuck) opens the turn with a yodeling 
number, in which he accompanies him- 
• self on the guitar. He displays a re- 
markably good voice for an acrobat 
and the song landed for big returns. 
Claire gets into the proceedings fol- 
lowing the vocalizing, putting over a 
routine of difficult contortionistic feats. 
While Claire is resting, Tuck contrib- 
utes some excellent ground tumbling. 
There is a bit of talk here and there, 
which could be built up. Good open- 
ers or closers for big time. 

Bell 

Three Mow-atts. 
Club Juggling. 
12 Mins.; Full Stage. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. 

The Three Mow-atts formerly work- 
ing in Chinese costume, have cut out 
the Chink raiment, two of the men 1 ' 
working straight and the comedian 
changing to black face, in place of the 
comedy Chinese character assumed in 
their old offering. The club juggling 
routine remains the same, a triple 
formation at the finish furnishing a 
spectacular closing stunt that should 
. work out as a sure applause winner in 
any type of house. The comedian 
seems to be more at home in black 
face, slipping several laughs over that 
were missing in the old arrangement, 

Bell 



4 Casting MeHoe. 
AeriaL 

10 Mins.; Four. 
23rd Street 

To paraphrase a popular song lyric, 
where has this quartet been hiding all 
these years. Probably with some cir- 
cus or possibly in some other country. 
At any rate, the big time holds a hearty 
"welcome" waiting for this act The 
turn consists of three men and a wom- 
an. Of the men, the two stouter ones 
are the hurling forces that precipitate 
the other man atid woman through the 
air for thrilling hand to hand catches, 
the'tossee looping the loop and half 
and full side twistihgi A trampoline 
like arrangement is beneath them to 
break any falls. The kingpin, wherein 
the woman does a double loop, the 
loop from a hand swing to an ankle 
catch, was played up by what probably 
/ was a "fake" spill, the catcher missing 
her to audible sighs from the audience. 
They work fast and hard and crowd a 
number of thrillers into the space of 
the few minutes they consume. They 
are worthy of a spot on some big time 
lay-outs; a corking big time, opener 
or closer, always. Abel. 

Alexander Sparks and Co. (2) 
Animal Characterization. 
14 Mins.; Fall Stage (Special Set and 
Drops). 

Opens in "two," pajama-clad miss is 
dreaming about cats, Tabby and Tom. 
One prop and one live kitten repre- 
sent them. Pretty transparent drop 
with moon shining through. Special 
drop lowers briefly, rising discloses a 
back wall and porch. Two animal im- 
personators appear as Tabby and Tom 
and a feline courtship ensues. Tom 
offers his lady love money and a large 
diamond ring which she spurns. He 
wins her with a large rat and they 
exit to the wedding march. Then the 
girl in a summery short skirted frock 
returns and sings "I Like You," the 
cats pantomiming their love for her. 
For the finish all dance, the cats stand- 
ing erect for the first time. It is a 
pretty little act, the pantomime being 
exceptionally well done. The girl is a 
cute, pretty little person and an ex- 
cellent dancer. 



Wilson and McAvoy. 
Singing and Talking. 
15 Mins.; One. 
Keeney's, Brooklyn. , 

Wilson and McAvoy, two men, work- 
ing in evening dress, a nifty appear- 
ance constituting a big asset in their 
favor. McAvoy does most of the 
singing and ■shows a sweet tenor voice 
nicely adapted to pop songs. Most 
of the talk sounds new and is com- 
petently handled. The turn shapes up 
as a standard number for the pop 
houses. 

Bell. 



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John Dunsmure. 

Songs and Stories. 

12 Mins.; One. ; '-" 

Royal. ' 

John Dunsmure, recently of "Some- 
body's Sweetheart" is taking a plunge 
into vaudeville and doesn't seem to 
be properly 1 ' clothed for the immers- 
ion. Dunsmure's assets are a prepos- 
sessing appearance and a high class 
vocal equipment. He possesses a bass 
voice or unusual caliber but his re- 
pertoire doesn't show careful selec- 
tion. He is singing four numbers with 
Scotch stories sandwiched in between. 
The songs are "I Love To Hear An 
Irish Song" then "As I Drink" with 
a real glass of 2.75% as a prop, "You 
Can Always Depend on the Irish" and 
"I'm Goin' to Fall for a Homely Jane." 
A serious selection might help and a 
piano player would add class and in- 
crease the vocal appeal. The story 
telling is well handled and with a 
little reconstruction Dunsmure will be 
ready to stay. Con. 



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Dorothy Dahl and Walling. 
Skit' . 

15 Mins.; One and Three (Parlor). 
23rd Street 

Miss Dahl, formerly doing a single, 
has joined forces with Mr. Walling, ja) 
whose first name is not billed, pre- . 
senting a pleasing little song skit— 
as far as it goes. Mr. Walling pos- 
sesses a resonant baritone profitably 
employed with the renditions of "Pal 
o' Mine" and a "Drearij»" number. 
Miss Dahl warbles a little ditty with 
some suggestive catch lines. Both 
people stick to their characterizations 
of a pseudo-Bowery "moll" and a police 
captain. Miss Dahl impersonates an in- 
vestigator from the D. A.*s office sent 
to get the "dope" on the captain's pri- . 
vate life, to determine his ability to 
hold down a better job on the local 
police department Although the twist 
is something resembling a "punch," it 
sounds very amateurish and weak to 
the "wise" ones. At, any rate it served 
its purpose, particularly a sweet 
"slushy" finish, prior to curtain falling. 
The frame-work, as it stands, is suf- ' 
ficient to hold together a logical thread 
for the proper interpolation of the vo- 
cal efforts, although that's not saying 
it could not be improved. The act just 
now is set for better small time book- 
ings. Abel. 

BRIGHTON. 

Rather a slow moving bill at the beach this 
week with the hits coming In Jerks, although 
the ehow on the whole Is rather well up to big 
time standard. Monday night a good sized 
audience attended, but the weather had a 
tendency to keep the visitors outdoors. Jimmle 
Hussey and Co. (New Acta) headlined, clos- 
ing the first part and running 35 minutes. It 
did much to hold up the program, and with 
this idea Hussey has apparently established 
himself as a producer. The act goes to Rock- 
away next week and then returns to this 
house for a return week. 

The genuine surprise of the bill was' Sybil 
Vane, a youthful looking prima donna, pretty, 
and, while rather miniature in size, carries a 
voice that runs second to mighty few in vaude- 
ville. For volume, clarity and tone Miss 
Vane is vocally perfect. ■ She gave the 
Brlghtonltes their money's worth, rendering 
several numbers and encoring with Tosti's 
"Good Bye." Miss Vane scored a smashing 
hit, and from a standpoint of applause took 
away the evening's honors from everyone. 
Tbis girl carries production timber, and It's 
safe to predict some Broadway producer will 
kidnap her away from vaudeville before long. 

Alfred Farrell and Co. were delegated to 
the opening position, showing a combination 
painting skit, forming pictures of rags it) a 
manner stmilar to the work of the Brighton* 
Some contrast Is ottered in a water picture br 
the male member. It's a snappy opening num- 
ber, somewhat unique In' construction, and 
because of the novelty proportions should find 
It easy going. 

Masters and Kraft were second and knocked 
out a safe hit with their routine of dances. 
They have an idea behind their work, some 
good comedy, and with .their pedal ability are 
a surefire selection for any big time bill. 
Incidentally they, too, show musical comedy 
possibilities. 

The Arnaut Brothers are ' apparently well 
known to the Brighton audience, for they were 
given a nifty reception on their entranse. The 
musical division was. well received, but the 
bird Imitation at the finale ensured success. 
It gathered continuous laughs and the boys 
retired well rewarded. 

Sybil Vane and the Hussey turn completed 



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SHOW REVIEWS 1 



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the Irat half with Chrli Richards ioxofng ea 
attar Intermission. It wu I difficult spot to 
get over In, for they were continually eomlng 
In, Richards worked hard to arouse some 
enthusiasm, but they refused to become In- 
terested, and be left to only a small return, 
although in a better position he might have 
done considerably better, for Richards, always 
a capable "single," has not gone back one iota. 
.«• The Marmeln Sisters and David Schooler 
have a combination turn composed of music 
and dancing. The Egyptian dance at the 
opening was especially well done, and School- 
er's Impressions on the piano earned him an 
individual hit. It's a classy looking produc- 
tion and well picked for a summer show. 

Williams and Wolfus were the usual comedy 
hit In the next to closing spot with the familiar 
Rlva-Larsen Troupe winding up the show. 

Wynn. 

RIVERSIDE. 

The heat hit the box office a hefty wallop 
Monday night, attendance being about BO per 
cent, below normal. The higher priced seats 
were the losers, numerous rows of vacant 
orchestra chairs giving the downstairs aectlon 
a deserted appearance. . 

Those who were Is saw an average show, 
holding plenty of diversified entertainment 
and running smoothly 'from opener to news 
weekly. The Youngers and Blossom" 8eeley 
were both out, their places being filled by Roy 
Harrah and Bradley and Ardlne. - 

Venlta Gould opening after Intermission 
pulled down the big hit with Imitations. Start- 
ing with Grace La Rue Miss Gould ran 
through the standard list, including Geo. M. 
Cohan, Eva Tanguay, Bert Williams and Julian 
Elttnge, for some mysterious reason missing 
Eddie Foy. Her' impression of Jack Nor- 
worth was extremely realistic 

George Kelly and Co., next to closing, also 
fared very ' well, the audience catching the 
full meaning of the satire contained In Kel- 
ly's latest sketch, "The Flattering Word." 
Kelly and his company play the piece In an 
easy legitimate fashion, bringing out the 
comedy nicely without straining for effect. 
The quiet finish, unusual In vaudeville 
sketches, adds a touch of class that makes the 
ivelly sketch different from the standardized 
variety, and brought the principals back tor 
sGvcr&l bows * * ...»-" . 

Al Shayne,' closing, held 'em throughout the 
comedy portion of his act, 'the , walkers wait- 
ing until the solo aectlon started before be- 
ginning the the parade to the exits. Shayne's 
Italian "plant" In the orchestra pit would 
heighten the illusion greatly by wearing 
clothing like the rest of the musicians in- 
stead of a dark suit. The talk went over Its 
regulation score, Shayne's clever mugging 
helping the general effect considerably. 

Harry and Grace Ellsworth, corking dan- 
cers, were a decided success, on second. Miss 
Ellsworth Is showing a couple of very at- 
tractive changes, an abbreviated blue cos- 
tume worn for her single standing out par- 
ticularly. The acrobatic double dancing is 
real big time stuff. With better material the 
team would advance easily. 

Chas. and Henry Rtgoletto, assisted by the 
Swanson Sisters, held up the Arte part with 
their versatile routine. The accordeon playing 
at the finish, by no means the beet of the 
various bits offered, landed the biggest re- 
turns, however. 

Moran and Mack experienced a little trouble 
In livening things up with their conversa- 
tional routine at the start, but pulled out 
successfully with their eccentric dancing. The 
boxing finish gathered In Its regular quota of 
laughs. 

Bradley and Ardlne, closing the first half, 
displayed a carload of nifty costumes and 
rung up a sizeable total, with three or four 
dancing numbers. A Chinese song and dance 
and a Spanish affair were the best liked. 
- Roy Harrah and Co. opened, and started the 
show off at a lively gait with their familiar 
skating turn. Bell, 

HENDERSON'S. 

Frisco was topping the bill at the home of 
the hot dog, and as your correspondent wan- 
dered around waiting for the show to start, 
he was attracted by a crowd around the ring 
of the bell booth opposite the stage door, Frisco 
was swinging the sledge and the faithful 
Rasputin was doing the shtll as usual. The 
'bell suffered for a few minutes and after the 
Jan King had wiped hie sweating brow he 
admitted he was shilling for the guy who has 
the concession. No use talking, this Dubuque 
boy has color, everybody on the Island knew 
him, and later In the theatre when asking 
for the names of dancers to imitate he was 
bombarded with a flock of names that ran 
from Rose Bailey to Park & Tllford. He is 
a great favorite at the Island and cleaned up 
in seventh position. Loretta McDermott Is a 
wonderful little partner, and her dancing Is 
an artistic treat. She U singing "High 
Brown Baby's Ball," and does a double with 
Frisco which they are using for a finish. 

Pat Rooney and Marlon were next to closing, 
following the ehlmmlers. They are billed "20 
Minutes of Pat and Marlon," but should 
change It to 40. Pat baa one song after about 
three falses finishes, that carries encore 
verses of everything from Prohibition to "The 
Boys Who Saved the Nation," etc. He did 
an Imitation of Frisco that was a riot, and 
made a speech claiming Lewie never bought 
him a cigar. Frisco walked on and presented 
him with one. Later Ivan Bankoff walked 
out on Rooney and lifted the smoke. 

Ben Welch was one Just ahead of the sledga 
swinger and had them laughing all the way. 
He has some new gags, but the old ones went 
Just as well. The Avsrae and Catsklll Moun- 
tain reference* wire a seream te tali bnask. 

Fransls fttaailt was mend "Ufe.*!" 1>"l«ti 
wardrobe OTtplBy and falWtW vocalising. H!» 



lower registers sound flat wbea singing, fetft 
he shines when he hits the tops. He encores 
after removing the wig and exhibits quite a 
personality after the sex disclosure. The 
wardrobe is beautiful, four or five of his 
changes arousing considerable comment from 
the women present. : - " 

To to was third and proved himself the 
great art let that he Is. As a contortionist he 
is In a class by himself, and coupled with his 
showmanship and original Ideas it lifts him 
to a place alone. He opens with his Kewpie- 
land scene, then the "Imitation of the World's 
Greatest Dancer," using the skii shoes ins 
marvelous manner, then to "one" as the toy 
soldier with the uncontrollable boots and 
epaulettes. He does some clever falling and 
tumbling here, The song used doesn't be- 
long. It destroys the Illusion and the accent 
reveals bis origin. 

Sully and Houghton, on fourth, had tough 
going for a while with their talking and 
dancing skit. The dialog la clever but it was 
a trifle too. much so for the Islanders. The 
dancing hooked them, however, for Sully ex- 
hibits about as plastic a pair of legs as can 
be found. The double dancing la a treat and 
the girl Is an Ideal partner In every respect, 
They did thslr "dancing by book" aa an en- 
core. 

Bankoff followed and added another dancing 
bit to the dancing bill. Ivan's solo dance and 
the double posture dance were heartily ap- 
plauded. The "Russian Wedding." with both 
In the national costume, went aa big as usual. 
if their is any "hoch" stepper who can get 
more body revolutions before an audience 
than Bankoff,' let him apeak now or forever 
hold his shoes. 

The Setbacks opened and "fan Artistic 
Treat" closed the long bill. Con. 

23D~STREET. 

Owing to Hugble Clark's forced retirement 
from the bill, because of throat trouble, hav- 
ing appeared but for the first performance, 
six acts constituted the running length of toe 
vaudeville program. . Alice Brady In "Red- 
bead" was the feature film attraction. 
Kinograms and a General Electric educational 
filled out the picture program. The latter 
was a downright imposition on the audience's 
pat(ence. Those technical drawings explain- 
ing the propulsion of a modern battleship are 
Ideal for institutions of learning— pedagogues 
will readily grant the truth of this state- 
ment— rbut for entertainment their value la 
nil, being very, very boresome. The Braml- 
nos, two men In comedy make-up, opened the 
show with a musical novelty worthy of big; 
time bookings. Their musical pamtomlme 
finish sent them off big, the house being ready 
to acknowledge their approval of the offer- 
ing Charlotte Worth and Dorothy Dafal and 
Walling (New Acts) are more extensively 
reviewed elsewhere. Wllber Sweatman and 
Co. pleased with their Jazs offerings, Sweat* 
man featuring the playing of two and three 
flutes at one and the same time. 

Oonne and Albert, working before a special 
school house drop In "one," toplined and 
walked away with the hit of the evening. 
Their style and delivery are sure fire, the 
girl's nuttlsms winning the house. ' Her 
whistling made a decided Impression on the 
audience, a whistling conversation as an en- 
core sending them off Immense. The Four 
Casting Mellos (New Acts), a sterling turn 
that should find easy. going with the best of 
company, closed the show to excellent re- 
turns. The act is a genuine thriller. Abel. 

AMERICAN ROOF. 

In spite of the torrid atmosphere, a fairly 
large, albeit somewhat dressed, house was on 
deck for the opening act Monday. The show, 
while entertaining on a whole, was raggedly 
laid out, with, several unnecessary and tire- 
some stage delays owing to the required 
scenery shifting. Fully three minutes w the 
clock elapsed prior to the rise of the curtain 
on the Mr. and Mrs. Hill net toward the 
end of the program. Mrs. Sidney Drew's 
latest V. B. K. comedy, "Bunkered." started 
things going. Mrs. Drew, as a 91m director, 
did a sterling Job. But for all the participa- 
tion she takes in the plot, she might just as 
well not be featured. All that's left to re- 
mind one of the halcyon days, of the love and 
domestlo 'trials and tribulations of Polly and 
Henry, is just her name— Polly — which she 
still retains. The rest of the yarn, which In- 
eludes the most of the footage, Is just the 
portrayal of a love affair between one Angle 
and her beau, who happens to be Polly's 
brother. Mrs. Drew flits in and out of sev- 
eral scenes. 

Emma and Boyd (New Acts) opened the 
vaudeville with some trapeze work, being fol- 
lowed by Turelly, a harmonica soloist, who 
can Improve his routine quite a little. His 
aged musical monolog was not so good owing 
to the ancient numbers employed. His sense 
of humor can be Improved upon. Sabbott and 
Brooks, a neat song and dance, bard working 
couple that are deeervant of better time, 
scored the applause hit of the first half. The 
miss's winsome style goes a long way In win- 
ning out. The couple can also step some, the 
boy's eccentric to the tuno of "By Heck," 
was an actual physical strain on the hot 
night. The girl's recent visit to the beach, 
which resulted in a shoulder and arm tan, 
could not be entirely camouflaged under the 
powder. Faber and McGowan (New Acta) 
preceded Fatlma and Co., topllnlng and closing 
the first half. Fatlma may be a good drawing 
card because of the amount of bared nether 
anu upper anatomy she exposes, but as a 
terplschorean artist she evinced no outbursts 
of approval. Maybe, though, ther were too In- 
terested and engrossed In following the prog- 
rets of the bared pertlens to exercise their 
bnarqs. 

Van Bsrgen and Jtafeplilrrs (New A'cWt »*• 



opened hlitllltles with a concert type of piano 
act that got returns. Mr. and Mrs. Hill and 
Co., the latter a man who deserves equal 
billing, offered a well written and excellently 
portrayed comedy skit, "Poor Old Jim," with 
a laugh In every line. Mumford and Stanley 
(New Acta), next to closing, stopped the show 
and cleaned up. Bell and Grey, a couple, 
closed with their wire act. The news reel 
completed the program. Ateh 

HARLEM OPERA HOUSE. 

The first half of. the week the films play 
Just as important a part in the shows here as 
does the vaudeville. On Tuesday night the 
house was Jammed early for the double fea- 
ture and six-act show that was offered. With 
a feature at either end of the show the vaude- 
ville does not get an opportunity until about 
8.40. 

The two feature pictures were "The 
Microbe" with Jackie Saunders and- Ethel 
Clayton in "Vicky Van," and In addition there 
was the Kinogram news reel. 

Following the overture the first act, James 
and Bessie Aiken (New Acts) got on at ten 
.minutes to nine. The second turn, Edmunds 
and Siege! (New Acts) were almost laughed 
from the stage and couldn't take a Joke In the 
way of applause and came back for more. 

Helen Gleason and Co. in "Stateroom 19" 
was the first act or the bill to get anything like 
applause, but it remained for Patsy Doyle to 
score the first real hit of the evening. Patsy 
went to the audience with his stories and got 
laughs right from the start. 

Following this there was the presentation of 

"gifts" from the stage, and then the Four 

' Haley Girls- stopped -the show completely. The 

girls could have come back with a couple of 

additional numbers had they so wished, 

Closing the vaudeville section Billy Hart 
and Girls were well liked. The show as a 
whole, however, was rather weak from the 
vaudeville standpoint Fret. 

KEITH'S, PHILADELPHIA. 

Philadelphia, July an. 

Playing to an audience that -was willing 
enough, but too busy fanning Itself to ap- 
plaud, the artists on this week's bill found 
It pretty hard to get anything over the foot- 
lights Monday, yet all worked- earnestly 
enough, and richly deserved all they got in 
return. This theatre Is the best equipped 
house In town for supplying comfort to Its 
patrols, but about the only thing that would 
have cooled off Monday's audience was to 
have turned a hose running Ice water over the 
crowd. 

As might have been expected, the show 
draged along, two or three acts getting a 
fair amount of reward for their labor, but 
the show never had a chance te prove its 
real value and everyone suffered, including 
the actors and the audience. . It was not un- 
til the show was about half over that there 
was any sign of life from the fan-workers In 
front and then It was a sort of half-hearted 
response. 

Orvllle Stamm, the Strang boy who la billed 
as a physical director of the D. B. Navy dur- 
ing the 'war, bad the task of starting the 
show. Stamm has an odd way of perform- 
in? his strength tricks and shimmies his 
way through some muscle display, getting by 
In a fair way. Then came Burns and Lynn 
In a dancing turn that was very slow. The 
boys stall a lot, but work up some comedy 
by having one of the theatre attaches call 
out the styles of dancing he would like to 
see them do. - This Is on the order of what 
Georgia White and Frisco did here ahead of 
these boys, only that White and Frisco had 
the names of dancers called, while Burns and 
Lynn mix In styles of dances. It la all 
wrong for these boys anyway and while It 
might be termed a nice summer set— one of 
those where you don't have to kill yourself 
working— It Is a bit too slow to get the boys 
what they ought to be, for both can step 
when they try. . 

Paul Decker, programed as a legitimate 
favorite is using 'The Ruby Rsy," sketch 
originally played here by Hassard Short a 
season or so ago. The best that can be said 
of this sketch Is that it Is given an attrac- 
tive setting, the various principals dress nice- 
ly and the Idea of mixing cocktails and get- 
ting a quick souse brings fond memories of 
the days when America was free to those 
who eared to drink. But as a vaudeville 
sketch It barely passes by In the fair class. 
Mr. Decker 1s an energetlo young man who 
tries hard to be funny and maybe could suc- 
ceed If the part was there for him, but it 
takes quite a bit more than Mr. Decker 
possesses as a comedian to make 'The Ruby 
Ray" even fairly lntoxlcatlngry tunny. Ar- 
nold and Allman started things going nicely 
with their odd bit of chatter and song, called. 
"Vice-Versa." Probably many in front did 
not appreciate the clever bit of travesty con- 
tained in the reversed flirtation Idea, but It 
Is clever, well put on by this pair and It was 
so well liked that those in front- were willing 
enough to bestow some recognition. Then 
came the hard-working Four Marx Brothers 
— or at- least three workers, for the fourth 
does very little except to look well in evening 
clothes — and there was a bright half hour 
of what is called, "N'Everythlng." The title 
is a good description of the act which is 
shown In two sosnes. There is a little bit of 
everything Jammed into their offering and a 
lot of It is very good, getting both laughs and 
applause. It Is a sort of free-for-all affair 
with every one taking a shot at' the fun-mak- 
ing without' any attempt to set any of the bits. 
It contains variety with three of the four 
boys carrying off the chief honors and Rita 
Ca-ltoa and Mary Orth coming In for a lib- 
eral sha re, The Llghtaer Girls and Alsxan- 

BoTfgii Onf mvK vtVtVXW OTmeTfy In a* Wrt 



of Blfle Far-Eddie Foy way that added soma 
humor to the act, though at times it seemed 
as If she was drawing It out a little too long. 
Their songs are splendid and well done, get- 
ting the biggest hands and giving them a very 
good finish. 

The big applause and laughing hit went to 
Moss and Frye. Here is something genuinely 
funny and entirely away from anything In 
the line of a two-man singing and tawing 
turn. What they do Is Just nonsense, but 
there is real wit In every line and the boys 
top it off with some real hnraonltiag that,' 
did not miss Its mark. They were a real big 
hit. being brought back tor some extra, bows' 
and could have stayed longer, which Is going 
strong when everyone seemed wilted. A nice.. 
showy acrobatlo and posing turn by the Five 
Patrowara filled the closing spot nicely, soma 
ot their work rousing the house enough to 
get a warm band. 



■Cl-cil 



KEITH'S BOSTON. 

Boston, July 80. i-v-.; 

It isn't reasonable to suppose that those 
powers that book the shows into the local 
Keith house should know that the last week 
in July would be a hot one here. Nor could 
they be expected to know that on the opening 
night, Monday, the mercury would be dang- 
ling up around the 85 mark. -But It does seem 
reasonable to expect the booking experts to 
realize at the time a bill Is made up that 
such- a thing as hot weather in July la prob- 
able and the bill might well have been made 
up with this Idea in mind. However, such la 
not the ease this week and the bill, without 
a headllner, waa so full of sketches and acts 
that demanded concentration that it dulled 
the sensibilities of the audience and resulted 
in a flat reception to some of the acts which 
might have fared differently under other con- 
ditions. Monday night the audience was not 
responsive and this feeling ponetrated to the 
artists themselves. 

It was the first Monday night that the house 
showed the effects ot the hot weather. There 
was nothing light and frothy, nothing In the 
way of a musical sensation to attract people, 
and the only musical instrument which mads 
its appearance was a piano, and this melody 
producing Instrument was wheeled on and 
oft the stage so many times during the 
evening that even George Williams, the am- 
iable and humorous stage hand, began to show 
the effects of the strain, aa did also the 
piano, judging from the squeaks. If business 
during the week Is not any better than Mon- 
day night, the dead character of the bill can 
be blamed. 

The ahow Is opened by the Tomakl Duo, a. 
Japanese outfit, which use for the major por- 
tion of their act a demonstration ot the Jap- 
anese art of self-defense. While there is 
nothing new in their material the clever man* - 
ner In which they nut It over and the smooth 
running proved to be enough to get, them 
across in fair style. It is a splendid opener. ' 

Bert Howard, who has a skit that is billed 
as "A Little Artistic Nonsense," was the first 
one of the acts, In two position, to flash the 
piano, with which the house later became so 
familiar, on to the stage. He has a single 
that Is entertaining, but If It came later in 
the bill It would have fared badly. As it was 
he got the house on the jump, and his pop- 
ular songs, and the rest of his light and 
frothy material, went over. 

"Skeet" Gallagher and Irene Martin follow. 
Their "Sweaters" is a rather Intangible thing 
on which to hang a sketch. It is rather dif- 
ficult to conceive how the name of the sketch 
ever came to exist, it is hung on such a 
slender thread. It came, also, too early on 
the bill, to ahow to the best advantage, aa the 
house had not settled down. 

Marie and Ann Clark were handicapped at 
the start of their act. It is necessary for them 
to have one of the team planted In the am-' ' 
dlence, but therein was the rub. Keith's Bos- 
ton house Is not well adapted to acta of this 
kind. It is necessary tor a flight of stops 
down through one of the aisles and then the 
task of setting up the steps begins. There- 
fore the house had sapped all the novelty out 
of the act before it waa under way. They run 
a burlesque Liberty loan campaign which 
palled a bit, but the personality of the two 
finally got the turn over. 

Another sketch followed, Robert Hymao and 
Virginia Mann. While it Is long it appeals to 
the human viewpoint because of tbe Idea, It 
being a story ot how a maa brings his boss 
'• home to dinner to get a raise and the com* 
plications which follow. It is very well put 
over. 

Irving Fisher was perhaps the nearest 
thing to a headllner the bill could boast of. 
It waa his first appearance here, which in 
Itself was something In his favor, as tbe 
others were familiar. He explained to the 
house that he was a stranger here and hoped 
for the best. The originality of his act, nls 
voice and his appearance guaranteed him suc- 
cess from tbe start. He got across very well. 

John Hyams and Leila Mclntyre in "May- 
bloom," are old friends to a Boston audience, 
well and worthily known to the Keith the- 
otre-goors for these many years. 

Just where Bernard and Duffy would have 
got off Monday night without that life sav- 
ing dancing number which the former used 
at the close of their act is a question. It 
looked as though they wouldn't get off at all. 
How a singer can expect to get across in a 
metropolitan city (for such we still consider 
Boston as we have 2.75 per cent beer here 
on public sale) using numbers such as "Ja 
Da, and some others that have been worked 
so generously, because of their merit, as that 
one has. is a puzzle. Bernard saved the act. 
He put more pep into the last few minutes 
ef it than had been In the entire cyola. A 
rear drochr. Is Bernards " .....-''.,; 

Coll Ins arid Hart ttos¥ thi shoVi 



' ' ' '-.' .7 --—v. • 



8&3*w®J 



24 



.> 



VARIETY 



fBVPl 



H' i? 



BILLS NEXT WEEK (AUG. 4) 



\ 



In Vaadeville Theatres 

(AU honw optn for th» weak with Monday matinee, whan not qrtbanriae lndiaated.) 

The bill* betow are grouped In divisions, aesordlng to the booking offloee they an supplied 
from. ' 

The manner In which the** bills are printed doe* not denote the relative fapartanoe of 
aeta nor their progrera poeltlone. 

• Before Dame Indleatas aet la now dolna new turn, or reappearing aftar aheeaae from 
vaudeville, or appearing In city where listed for the tret time. 



B. F. KEITH 



Palece Theatre Bnlldtmr. New^ York City 

•Murray Sisters 
McKay ft Ardine 
Bernard ft Duffy 

Keith's Orpheana 
Wilfred Du Bola 
Sherman ft Uttry 
D Shoemaker Co 
Duffy ft Caldwell 
Literary Digest 
Ward ft Van 
(Others to. till) 



DR. J. BIER, PHYSICIAN 



NEW YORK CITY 

Keith'* Palace 

Ous Edwards Co 
Hyama & Mclntyre 
Marmeln Sis ft S 
Clifton Crawford 
Nat Nazarro Co 
Herbert Clifton 
Venlta Gould 
Flying Martins 
(One to fill) 
Keith's llivorslde 
Artistic Treat 
Fallon ft Brown 
Arnaut Bros 
Vlnle Daly 
Mason Keeler Co 
Josephine & Hennlng 
Llghtners ft Alex 
Jack Alfred Co 

Keith's Royal 
The Kennedys 
Frank Mullane 
Ruth Budd 
Sylvester & Vance 
Eddie Foy Co 
Conrad ft Conrad 
Bert. Howard 
Cygl ft Vadle 
Burns A Frablto 

Keith's II O H 
2d half (Sl-2) 
Copeland ft McK 
•"The Cat" 
Bernard & .Merrltt 
. Andrew Mack 
1st half (4-6) 
Lewis ft Dody 
Bert Earl Co 
(Others to All) 

2d half (7-10) 
R C Faulkner 
"Every Sailor" 
(Others to All) 
Proctor's 125th St 

2d half (31-3) 
4 Cliffords 
Hipp 4. 
Mllo 

On It os & DeLure 
(Two to fill) 

1st half (4-6) 
"Girl In Air" 
Yankee 4 
Zelaya 

Marzella'a Birds 
(Two to fill) 

2d half (7-10) 
Helen Miller 
Gilbert Sis 
Jaa Thompson 
(Two to fill) 
Proctor's Sth Ave. 

2d half (3-3) 
•Whltledge'ft B 
•Duffy & Caldwell 
Helen , Gleason Co 
•Leon-Varvara 
Blssle & Blake 

1st half (4-6) 
J Clark Co 
M Maxfleld Co 
R C Faulkner 
(Two to fill) 

2d half (7-10) 
John Cutty 
"Business proposal" 
(Others to fill) 
Proctor's 2ftd St. 
2d half (81-8) 
El Vera Sis 
Dave Manley 
Hawthorne ft Cook 
4 Haley Sis 
Sablnl ft Goodvryn 
Martin ft Frablnl 
1st half (4-6) 
Lorlng Smith 
Snrnnoff ft Girls 
Walter Brower 
(Three to All) 

2d half (7-10) 
Greenlee ft Drayton 
WIMIam Morrow 
Benvento Duo 
Billy Hart Co 
CONE IYSLAND 
Brighton 
Adonis Co 
Stanley ft Blrnes 
Morris ft Campbell 
Joe Towle 
L Cavanaugh Co 
Marie Nordstrom 
4 noises 
(Two to All) 

Henderson's 
Davis ft Pelle 
Wilton Sis 
Langford ft Fredk 
•Al Raymond 
*J Rosamond ft J 
ChaB King Co 
Sylvia Loyal Co 
(One to All) 

BROOKLYN 
Keith's Buahwlck 
Alfred Farrell Co 
H & G Ellsworth 
Paul Decker Co 
Moss ft Frye 
Ernest Evans Co 



1493 Broadway 



Room 209, PatMm Bolldlno 

NEW YORK CITY 



Keith's Greeapofavt 

2d half (31-8) 
Jean Adair Co 
Chas Lawlor ft D 
(Others to All) 

1st half (4-6) 
Bernard ft Merrltt 
Wlllard ft Hamilton 
(Others to All) 

2d half (7-10) 
"Girl in Frame" 
Dotson 

Marlmo ft Maley 
B Earl ft Girls 
Keith's Prospeot 

3d halt (31-8) 
The Bra.rr.lnoB 
Melnotte ft Leedam 
Hampton ft Blake 
Grew ft Pates . 
Herbert Clifton • 

"Girl I^AIr" 

1st half (4-6) 
Helen Miller 
Helen Gleason Co 
Dotson 
Marino ft Maley 

2d half (7-10) 
Patsy Doyle 
M MazAeld Co 
Lewis ft Dody 
(Others to AU) 

Halsey 
Homer Romalne 
Boland ft Vine 
Althoff Sis 
Ford ft 8haw 
Corlnthana 

3d half 
Mardo ft Lorens 
Jos F Wlllard Co 
Kinney ft White 
Chas Barthlemon 
Al Striker 

ALBANY. N. Y. 

Proctor's 

(Troy split) 
1st half 
s Hoy Sla 
Strand 3 

Father's Daughter 
W Sweatman Co 
Canton 8 

ATLANTA 

Lyric 
(Birmingham split) - 

1st half 
Ford ft Urma 
Rublnl & Martin 
Arthur Finn Co 
Temple 4 
Arco: Bros 

ATLANTIC QUI 
R. r. Kelthns 

6 Partrowars 
Shaw ft Campbell 
"Only Girl" 
Bob Hall 
Wilbur Mark Co 
Nlta Jo 

Ritchie A 8t Onge 
BALTIMORE) 
Maryland 
Novelty Clintons 
Wallace Calvin 
"The Cat" 
Ryan ft Healy 
Blllte Shaw Co 
Toney ft Norman 
Rae Samuela 
Ideal 

BINGHAMTON 

Stone 

Pasqualle ft Golden 
Garden ft Garden 

2d half 
Walter J Hayes 
8 Kings 

BIRMINGHAM, 

* ALA. 
Lyric 
(Atlanta split) 

1st half 
Lo Roy ft Hart 
Hlbbert ft Malle 
Florence Henry Co 
Qulxy 4 
Werner Amoros Tr 

BOSTON 
B. F. Keith's 
Jim, Jazz King 
Lew Hawkins 
Bradley ft Ardtne 
Bobbe ft Nelson 
B Morgan Co 
Craig Campbell 
Stone ft Kallsz 
Montgomery t Allen 
Roland Travera 



BUFFALO 

Shea's 
Sarnated ft Marlon 
Permane ft Shelly 
"Indoor Sports" 
Dolly Kay 
Ivan Bankoff Co 
B ft H Mann 
Peck ft Mclntyre 
4 Danube* 

' CAMDEN, N. J. 

Towers 
Nifty 8 

Monte ft Parte 
Mullally McC Co 

Eugene Emmett 
"All Abroad" 
2d half 
Dancing Dorians 
Miller ft Cook 
Resloto 
Bills ft Irwin 
Doreea Celebrities 

CHARLESTON. 

S. O. 
Victory 

(Columbia split) 
1st half 
Swain's Animals 
Edward Marshall 
Barke ft Betty 
Spencer ft Hand 
McConnell ft Austin 

CHATTANOOGA 

Hlalto 
(Knoxvllle split) 
1st half 
Wilson Aubrey 8 
Coy De Tricksy 
Dan Holt Co 
Mae Melville 
M Hart ft Band 
CHESTRH">PA. 
Adg*ment 
Dancing Dorians 
Miller ft Cook 
Reslsto 
Ellis A Irwin 
Doreea Celebrities 



GRAND RAPIDS 
Ramoaa Pk. 

J Regay ft Sla 

Betty Bond 

"Sweeties" 

Ted Doner 

"Old Time Darkles" 

(One to All) 

HAZELTON, PA. 

Feeler's 
Roblnetto 
Helen Colene Co 
Bender ft Meehan 
"New Doctor" 

Id half 
Neary ft Gore 
Black ft White 
Gertrude Morgan 
William Ebbs Co 

HOLYOKB. MASS. 
Mt Morris Pk 

The Nellos 
Gonne ft Albert 
Roy LaPearl Co 
Girl from Milwaukee 

INDIANAPOLIS 
B. P. Keith's 

(Sunday opening) 
Danolng DeMons 
Cooney Sis 
Harry Oaks Co 
Hudson ft Jones 
Fear Baggett ft F 

ITHACA. N. T. 
Star 
Walter J Hayes 
Ryan ft Rlgars 
Stars tn Tovland 

2d half 
Annette ft Marrell 
Bobby Randall 
Dixon Bowers ft D 

JACKSONVILLE, 
FLA. 

Arcade 

(Savannah split) 
1st half 
Bandy A Fields 



DENTISTS 

to thl ZfeMtrlcol Pmrnttton 

Dr. M.P. Chodos— Dr. L. Glucksmah 

Putnam BtSg., 1493 Broadway, New York 

ROOM M1-XI1R 

Mww; IB to B'W. jpj hv S.-W.I annntntmmt 



2d half 
Nifty 8 

Monte A Parte 
Mullally McC Co 
Buarene Emmett 
"All Abroad" 

CINCINNATI 
B. F. Keith's 

(Sunday onenlng) 
Deeran ft Clifton 
McD A Cleveland 
Jerome A Herbert 
Geo Randall Co 
Rector Weber A It 
CLEVELAND 
Hippodrome 
Jack Han ley 
Hushes Duo 
» Swift A Kelly 
Larry Comer 
Moskova Ballet 
Lee A Cranston 
ti 8 Jass Band 
COLUMBIA. S. C. 

Colombia 
(Charleston split) 

1st half 
Marararet Ford 
Willie Mahoney 
Emma Francis Co 
(Two to fill) 
DAYTON 
n. F. Keith's 
(Toledo split) 
let half 
J Morrlssey Co 
Miller ft Lyle 
Musical Echo 
Moore ft Girls 
Hackett 6 Delmar 
ELMIRA 
Majestle 
Annette ft Marrell 
Bobby Randall 
Wayne Marshall ft C 
Dixon Powers & D 

2d half 
Ryan ft Rlggs 
Pasqualle ft Golden 
Stars In Toyland 



Sheldon A Dalley 
Pnlfrev Hall ft B 
Chas Wilson 
8 Eddvs 

JERSEY CTPY 
R. F. Keith's 

2d half (81-8) 
Dorothy Shoemaker 
"Fronted Flnlnce" 
Patsy Doyle 
(Two to All) 

1st half (4-6) 
Gilbert Sis 
Billy Hart Co 
Hampton ft Blaks 
"Girl tn Air" 

KNOTVTLLH 
BIJon 

(Chattanooga split) 

1st half 
McNamee 
Helen Harrington 
G D Hart Co 
4 Buttercups 
Dawn June 
LANC*.«TRR, PA. 

Colonial 
Gertrude Moraran 
Kemhprly ft Page 
B McCormack Co 
Esther 8 

8d half 
Fred A Albert 
Blllv Rhodes 
Wilcox La Croix Co 
F Fay ft Band 
LOTT19VTLLH 
B. F. Keith's 
(Nashville split) 

1st half 
George Moore 
Marconi ft Fltrgtbbon 
Klllan ft O'Dare 
MOBILE 
Lyric 
(New Orleans split) 

1st half 
Aerial Mitchells 
Vine ft Temple 
(Two to All) 



Walter Fennen 
Ann Sutor ■ 
W Hale ft Bro 

XT. VERNON, N. Y. 

Proctor's 
3d half (31-8) 
Casting Mellara 
Gonne ft Albert 
Walter Brower ■ 
Regay ft Sheehan 
Moyo ft Lynn 
-Jim" Jass King 
1st half (4-6) 
Black ft White 
Patsy Doyle 
M ft A Clark 
"Every Sailor" 

2d half (7-10) 
Marsella's Birds 
Masters ft Kraft 
- Walter Brower 
Man Bros Co 

NASHVILLE 
Princess 

(Louisville split) 
1st half 
Mile Paula 
Rhea Dufrasne 
"Flirtation" 
Orth ft Cody 
Moran ft Wiser 

NEWARK, N. 3. 
Palace 

2d half (31-1) 
Murray Sis 
M MazAeld Co 
Peck ft Mclntyre 
Diane ft Rublnl 
Wm Ebbs Co 
Johnson Baker ft J 

1st half (4-6) 
Masters ft Kraft 
Marx Bros Co 
Moran A Maok 
NEW LONDON 
Lyceum 
Field Sis, 
Keating ft Walton 
Saxton ft Farrell 
Toots Sweet 
Follette Monks 

*d half * 
Fred Eidrldge - 
Harry Tenny Co 
Reed ft Tucker 
( Two to All) 
NEW ORLEANS 

PitlBC* 

(Mobile split) 
1st half 
Mudare Morton 8 
Canwetl ft Walker 
LeMatre A Hayes 
Gabby Bros A C 
NEWPORT NEWS, 
VA. 
Olympic 
(Peteraburg split) 

iBt half 
T.uov Buch 
E Cochran Co 
Rvan A Rvan 
(One to All) 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Academy 
(Richmond split) 
1st half 
Kremka Broa 
M«rvl Prince Co 
Everest's Circus 
(Two to All) 

PETBRSBTTRO; VA. 

Ontnry 

(Newport News 
spilt) 
1st half 
J Small A Sit 
Dayton 

Sterling 4 { 

The Damacos 
(One to All) 

PHILADELPHIA 
R. F. Keith's 

Felix A Fisher 
Leon Varman 
Jason A Halg 
H Trlx A Sis 
Marconi Bros 
Eddie Borden 
Stella Mayhaw 
Bert FltRglhbon 
Mang A Snyder 

Grand 
Heyatkl Japs 
Lucv Bruch 
Morgan A Kloter 
Van Sheldon Co 
Jones A Greeley 
Lula Coatee Co 
PTTTSniTRGH 

Davie 
McC A Mellon 
Emerson A Baldwin 
Dunbars 10 
Chris Richards 
Mlllershln A Gerard 
Fantlno Tr 

Harris 
Frank Carter 
A A B Lleber 
Bijou Russell 
Renn A Cunn'gham 
Jerome A Newell 
Weber Beok ft F 
Danc'g Humphreys 



firiS FIELD 

. Msjrst Is 
Fred Bldiidge 
Stewart ft NerX 
D Richmond Co 
Harry Tenny Co 
Danolng Serenaders 

id half 
Gordon ft Gordon 
Field Sis 

Keating ft Walton 
Toots Sweet 4 

PORTLAND. MM. 
B. F. Keith's 
Dancing La Vara 
South ft Tobln 
6,000 a Year 
F ft M Brltton 
Lllliarf Herlein 
Plate! ft Cushlng 

RICHMOND 

Lyric 
(Norfolk split) 
1st half 
Budd ft Moyer Sis 
Jerman ft Shirley 
Hedley 8 
(Two to fill) 

ROANOKE. VA. 
Roanoke 

Bollinger ft Reynolds 
Kamplln ft Bell 
Olaen * Johnson 
Adler ft Dunbar 
Pot Powln 

2d half 
D Southern t 
Jimmy Dunn 
"Meanest Man" 
Chung Wha 4 
Johnny Clark Co 

SAVANNAH 

BIJon 

(Jacksonville split) 

1st half 
8 Freeds 
8 O'Connor Bis 
Clark Bllvsrolet Co 
G ft B Parks 
Prosper ft Moret 
SCHENECTADY 

Proeter>e 
Bollawa Girls 
Rob ft Robinson 
Early Lalght Co 
Chas Martin 
Harmony Club 
Id half 
Alma ft Merrlman 
Helen Vincent 
Mayor ft Manicure 
Jones ft Sylvester 
Syncopated Dancers 
SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

Crescent 
Alma A Merrlman 
Helen Vlnoent 
Emily Smiley Co 
8 Kings 

Jones A Sylvester 
Syncopated Dancers 

8d half 
Ptquo A Fellow 
Rob A Robinson 
Wayne Marshall ft C 
Harmony Club 
Green ft Latell 

TOLEDO 

B. F. Keith's 

(Dayton split) 

let half 
B ft J Grey 
Leonard ft Wlllard 
Green Miller ft G 
Nelson ft B Boys 
LaBenecta Co 
TORONTO 
Hippodrome 
Burns Bros 
Winkle ft Dean 
John MoQowan Co 
Hickman Bros 
McKay's Lassies 
TRENTON, N. J. 
Taylor O. H. 

Fred ft Albert 
Billy Rhodes 
Wilcox LaCroIx Co 
F Fay ft Band 
Corncob Cutups 

2d half 
Al Striker 
Althoff Sis 
Klmberly ft Page 
Barry McCortnaok 

TROY, N. T. 

Proctor'* 

(Albany split) 
1st half 
Chinese Entertainers 
May Gardner 
Hallen ft Goaa . 
Black ft White Hev 
Romas Troupe 

WASHINGTON 
B. F. Keith's 
Cummlngs ft White 
Jennie Mlddleton 
Arthur Havel Co 
Primrose 4 
Hermlne Shone Co 
Alan Rogers 
Al Shayne 
Regay ft Sheehan 



Pell Circuit 

. — s 



DR. JULIAN SIEGEL 
Official Dentist to the N. V. A. 

1493 Broadway (Putaaat Building), New York 



Walsh ft Austin 
El Cota 
Mew Leader 

2d halt 
Zlnka Panna 
Fox ft Ward 
Mable Morgan Co 

ILtRTPORD 
- Pslaee 

Hunter Chick ft H 
Marguerite Padula 
Allen ft Richmond 
McCarthy ft Fay 
Wm Slato 
GoBSler ft Lusby 

2d halt 
Earl ft Miller 
Harry Antrim 
Saxton ft Farrell 

NEW HAVEN 

BIJon 

Zlnka Panna 
Fox ft Ward 
Mable Morgan Co 
Harry Antrim 
Juvenile Follies 

3d half 
Allen A Richmond 
"New Leader" 
El Cota 

Pslaee 
Bailey Comedy 4 
Brltt Wood Co 
Kennedy A Burt 
Cahlll ft Raomaine 
McM Diamond ft R 

2d half 
Ester Trio 
Tom Sawyer 
McCarthy ft Fay 
Morgan ft Anger 
C Sebastian Co 
SCRANTON 
Poll's 
Al Striker 



Maoy ft Aroh 

N Lefflngwell Co 
Wm Ebbs 
Chas Ahearn Co 

2d half 
Helena Conine Co 
Bender ft Meehan 
Asahl Troupe 
(Two to All) 

WATBRBDRY 

Poll's 
Earl ft Mullen 
Shirley Sisters 
Billy Elliott 

Sd half 
Elsie Wheeler 
Keegan ft Edwards 
Lorens ft Florence 
William Slato 
Gossler ft Lusby 

WORCESTER 

Poll's 
Eleanore Fisher 
Anderson ft Burt 
Richard Lee 
"Rubevllle" 
(One to fill) '■•"-. 

8d half 
wiiia ft H Brown 
Billy Elliott 
McM Diamond ft R 
Marguerite Paduta 
D'Amour ft Douglas 

Plaaa 
Elsie Wheeler 
Ott ft Nlokeron 
Lorense ft Florence 
Keegan ft Edwards 
4 Soleras 

2d half 
Blcknell 
Walsh ft Austin 
Wilson ft Larson 
(Two to All) 



BOSTON B. F. KEITH 

Vasdevllle Exchange 

Beaten 

AMHERST, N. S. Walsh ft Edwards 

Empress Fern King Co 

(4-6) 2d half 

Hank Miller .Florenio Duo 

McCue ft Dean 4 Woodrow Girls 

Cole Feeley A Z Hallen ft Fuller 

Walsh ft Burk Walter Weems 

HcMaboo ft Adelaide (One to All) 



$14 



ROOnl for tvvo 1 



PER 
WT 



8 Mlnutta from All Thiatrai 
nsMMM Oeottel Pant 

$16 u wV GK R SUITESp^sorr«° 

Contlitlne of Parlor, Bedroom and Bath 
Lijht. Airy, with All iMprovements 

REISENWEBER'S HOTEL 

58th Street and Columbus Ciitta 

Naw York City 



BOSTON 
Bostoa 

Tojette & Bennetts 
Smith ft Kaufman 
Allen ft Lyman 
Kharnum 
Ballot Trio 
BROCKTON, MASS. 

Strand 
Miller ft Mack 
Davis & Darnell 
Concert Revue 

2d half 
Swan A Swan 
Marlon Weeks 
Moran ft Mack 

CAMBRIDGE 
Gordon's Central So.. 
Florence Duo 
The LeRoys 
Rudlnoff 
Woodrow Girls 
Rud ft Tuoker 

Id half 
The Brlghtons . 
Walsh ft Edwards 
Col Jack George 
Miller ft Maok 
Hill ft Aokerman 
HALIFAX 

Ackers 

(•-IB) 
Roberts ft Knowlea 
Jack Walsh 
D'Hallde ft Edwds 
Earl ft Bartlett 
Russell Van ft S 

Strand 

(9-1S) 
Rlgdon Dancers 
Eddie Badger 
Homer Lind Co 
Octavlo 
Robinson ft La Favor 

LYNN 
Gordon's Olympla 
Mori el n 
Marlon Weeks 



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BIONCTON. N. B. 

Empress 

Roberts ft Knowles 

Jack Walsh 

D'Hallde A Edwds 

Earl ft Bartlett 

Russell Van ft ■ 
NEW BEDFORD / 
Gordon's Olympla 

The Brlghtons 

Col Jack George 

Walter Weems 

Hallen ft Fuller 

Fern King Co 
Id half 

Morleln 

The LeRoys 

Davis ft Darnell 

Rudlnoff 

PORTSMOUTH 

(4-6) 

Blcknell 

Smith ft Farmer 

. (8-9) 
McHahpn ft Adelaide 
(Others to All) 
4H7INOY 
Klakald 
Gordon ft LeMar 
(Others to All) 
2d half 
Burke ft Walsh 
Cole Feeley ft Z 
ST. JOHNS, N. S. 
Opera House 

Rlgdon Dancers 
Eddie Badger 
Homer Lind Co ■ 
Octavlo 

Robinson & La Favor 
SYDNEY, N. S. 
Palace 
(4-6) 
The Brlssons 
G ft M De Glenn 
Burton 

Oreen ft Brown 
Marr ft Dwyer 



I 



E. HEMMINDINGER 

Jewelers to the Profession 

Liairrv bonds AOOOTtD TN. 



« JOHN STBHET 
Ntw YORK 



BRroOKPORT 
Poll'a 
Wills ft H Brown 
Tom Sawyer . 
Moraan ft Anger 
W Ward ft Girls 
(One to fill) 



2d half 
Brltt Wood Co 
Kennedy ft Burt 
Cahlll ft Romalne 
Juvenile Follies 

Plass 
H A Harlen 



DENTIST 
CHICAGO 



DR. M. 6. CART 

MeVISuf* Theatre Bids. 
Special Bates to the 
Prafeaalon 



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ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

Palaee Theatre Balldlnr. New York City 



CHICAGO 

Mnjr.tle 
"Not Tet Marie" 
Lydell ft Maey 
Tip Tip Taphankers 
Stevens & Holllater 
Ja Da 3 
En oe F razor 
Bob & Tip 

State-Lake 

Barnes & Crawford 
Shirley & Bonds 
De Leon & Davfes 
Chas Olcott 

7 Braacks 
Rae 8now 
Rosa King 8 
Stern & Dawson 
Lohse & Sterling , 

LOS ANGELES 
Orpbenni 

Nellie Nichols 
Bekefl & Scherer 
Clifford & Mills 
Deiro 

Harry. Hlnes 
Janla & Chaplow 

8 Jahns 
"American Ace" 



SALT LAKB 

Orpnenm 

(Wednesday open- 
Ins) 
Morgan Dancers 
Great Lester 
Ann Gray 
B & Sllvormoon 
LaRue & Dupree 
Lloyd & 'Wells 
Harry Hoi man Co 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Orphean 

(Sunday opening) 
Sheila Terry Co 
Oliver ft Olp 
Mile Nadjl 
Chinese Brass Band 
Murphy & White 
"Reckless Eve" 
lone Pastor! 
Nelson & Chain 
WINNIPEG 
Orphrom 

"Current of Fun? 
B & J Crelghton 
Casting Maids 
Hayden & Ercelle 
Herman & McManus 
Lambert! 
Frisco Co 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 

State-Lake Theatre Balldlnr, Chlearo 



DULUTH 

Grand 

2 Blondys 
CAT Harvey 
Billy Miller Co 
Gallerinl Sis 
"Olrl from Btarlsnd" 

2d half i 
J ft J Laughlln 
Knowles ft West 
(Two to AH) 
MINNEAPOLIS 

Palace 
Raines ft Avery 
Hall & O'Brien 
S Violin Misses 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Hello ToUo 
Grace DeWtnters 
(Three to fill) 

Palace 
J ft J Laughlln 
Hello Tokio ; ' ' 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Raines ft,- Avery 



Hall ft O'Brien 
6 Violin Misses 

(Two to pii) 

SUPERIOR 
Palace 

Billy Wolgaet 
Knowles A Hurst 
Quaker City 4 
Perl era Sextet 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
2 Blondys 
Billy Miller Co 
Gallerinl Sisters 
(Two to fill) ' 

WINNIPEG 
Strand 

Spanish Trio 
The Puppetts 
Dan Ahearn 
Stratford 4 

2d half 
Alnnson 
(One to All) 
8 Harmony Maids 
8 Regale 



MARCUS LOEW 



■ 



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Putnam Balldlnr, 
NEW YORK CITY 

American 

I White 8teppers 
•Dorothy A Buster 
Chas McGoods 
'NelRon ft Cronln 
*"Oh Oeorsre" 
Helen Moratl 

§ Set man Co 
urns ft Lynn 
Tasmannn Trio ' 

2d half 
Wllhur A Girlie 
Men ft Wallace, 
I Rubes V .. 

Wells ft Crest 
"Molldny In Dixie" 
Lieut Chas Gerard 
Al B White 
'One to fill) 

YlrfnrU 

BeJ.le A Gray • 
Chas Rellly 
Ronnlr A Ward 
Mum ford ft Stanley 
"The Owl" 

2d half 
Morton Bros 
Newell ft Moat 
Nelson ft Cronln ^ 
•"Oh Johnny" 

Lincoln So.. 
Morion Bros 
Harrison A Burr 
Dare Austin Co 
Tabor ft Green 
Paul A Pauline 

2d half 
Brown's Dogs 
Ellison A Brown 
Armstrong A Smith 
Nell McKTnley 
Chyo ft Chyo 

Grecnley So. 
Golflle ft Ward 
Donna Montram 
♦Wells ft Crest 
8 Rosellas 
Exposition 4 
•Scanlon Deno A S 

2d half 
Suzanne ft Ernest 
Arthur Turelll 
Patrick ft Otto 
H Selman Co 
Langdon A Smith 
6 Martins 

Delaacey St, 
Wilbur A Girlie 
Loney Nase 
"Somewhere in Fr" 
Durkin Girls ■ 
Al White 
Musical Hodges 

2d half 
Chong 

Dorothy A Buster 
Wyre ft Fields 
Norton Sher Co 
Burns A Lynn 
Chas McGoods Co 



New York City 

National 

4 Cllffordi 
Arthur Turelll 
Frarer Bunco A H 

5 Martina i • 
(One to fill) 

2d half \ 
Belle A Gray 
Loney Nase 
8 Ror.ellHB 
"Somewhere in Fr" 

Orphcnm 
Louise ft Carmen 
Baker A Rogers 
•Lieut Chas Gerard 
"Poor Jim" 
Sen Francis Murphy 
Mori Bros 

2d half 
Gladys Kelton 
Goldie ft Ward 
G ft Henderson 
Mann'g Feeley ft K 
"The Owl" 

Tloulrvard 

Chong 
June Mills 
Patrick ft Otto 
SAM Huehs 
2d half 
Sahhott ft Brooks 
Helen Morati 
Dare Austin Co 
Tabor ft Green 

Averinr II 

Suzanne ft Ernest 
Nellie Moore 
Jack Neville Co 
Bhea A Nelson - 
Newport ft Stlrk 

2d half 
Margels ft Wolf 
Dora Hilton Co 
LaTour ft Foley 
Davis ft Chadwlck 
BROOKLYN 
Metropolitan 
Francis ft Wilson 
Malcolm ft LaMar 
Conroy ft O'Donnell 
"Oh Johnny" 
2d half 
June Mills Co 
•"Oh George" 
Sen Francis Murphy 
•Scanlon Deno ft S 
(One to (ill) 

DeKalb 
Gladys Kelton 
Ford A Ooodrlck 
Herbert Brooks Co 
Langdon A Smith 
"Holiday in Dixie" 

2d halt 
4 Cliffords 
Durktn Girls 
"Poor Jim" 
Baker ft Rogare 
Mori Bros 



Palace 

Connolly ft Francis 
Jessie Reedy - 
Msawell Quintette 
Blnns ft Bert 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Renard ft Jordon 

5 ft M Hughs 
(Three to All) 

Fulton 
Brown's Dogs 
Newell ft-Most 
Armstrong ft S 
Nell McKJ'nley 

2d half 
2 White Steppers 
Ford ft Goodrick 
Ronalr & Ward 
Fraser Bunco ft H 
Musical Hodges 
Warwick 
Juggling DeLisle 
Dora Hilton Co 
Renard ft Jordon 
Davis A Chadwlck 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Jessie Reedy 
Jack Neville Co 
Daras Bros 
(Two to fill) 
ATLANTA 
Grand 
San Tuccl 
Rose Revue 
(Three to fill) 

2d halt 
Sylvester 

Peddrtck A DeVere 
Fred C Hagan Co 
Fields A Wells 

6 Royal Hussars 

BALTIMORE 

Hippodrome 

Cornelia A Adele 
Ted Healy 
O Hand worth, Co 
Hawthorne ft Cook 
8 Lordeno 

BIRMINGHAM 

BIJon 

Golden ft West 
Moore ft Shy 
Emmett ft Moore 
Peggy Brooks 
LeClalr ft Sampson 

2d half 
(Same as Atlanta 
1st half) 
T BOSTON 
Orphcnm 
Aerial Belmonts 
Millard ft Doyle 
Martin A Courtney 
Girls ft Guys 
Dave Harris 
Fashions De Vogue 
(One to All) 

2d half 
Cooper ft Lacey 
Jimmy Casson Co 
Cavanaugh ft T 
Hugh Norton Co 
Jack Reddy 
Fuji Troupe 

CHICAGO 
McVlckcra 

Bennington & Scott 
Wlnchelle ft Green 
Thorndyke ft C 
Gypsy Revue 
Dudley Douglas 
Carl Eugene Tr 
FALL RIVER 
BIJon 

Cooper ft Lacey 
Jimmy Casson Co 
Hugh Norton Co 
Jack Reddy 
Fuji Troupe 

2d half 
Millard .ft Doyle 
Martin A Courtney 
Dave Harris 
Fashions De Vogue 
(One to All) 

HAMILTON 
Loew 

Williams ft D 
" Francis A Hrfckett 
Clarence Wilbur 
Downing ft Runnln 
5 Musical Misses 
HOROKBN 
Loew 
8 Maxim Girls 
Bolsrer Bros 
LaTure ft Foley 
E Honey Girls 
(One to fill) 



2d half 
Teswama Trio 
Harrison ft Burr 
Ma -well Quintet 
(Two to fill) 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Empress 

Dolly ft Calame 
Nora Allen ft Co 
Jerome Merrick Co 
Al Tyler Co 
The.Ferraros 
, 2d half 
P George 
Rice ft Graham 
Dlxbn ft Gllday 
Harry Gilbert 
Anker Trio 

MEMPHIS 

Lyceum ■ 
Walker ft West i 
Buddy Walker 
"Just for Instance" 
8 Dixie Boys 
W ft Princeton 

2d half 
(Same as Birming- 
ham 1st half) 

MONTREAL 

:. Loew 
Asakhft Girlie 
Brown A Jackson 
Lane ft Harper 
Ash ft Hyams 
M Burke «& B 

NEW ORLEANS 
Crescent 

(Sunday opening) 
Harrison ft Holllday 
Williams ft Culver 
Doris Hardy Co 
Ed Phillips 
Aerial LaVails 
2d half 
(Same as Memphis 

1st half) > 

NEW ROCHBLLB 
Loew 
Daras Bros 
Cook ft Oatman 
Wyre A Fields 

2d half 
Connolly A Francis 
5 Honey Girls 
Shea ft Nelson 
PALISADES PARK* 

N.J. 
8 Daring Sisters 
Reddlngton ft Grant 
Rodriquez Bros 
Holden 

PTTTflflfrRGH 

Lyceum 

Norvellos 
Lillian Calvert 
"Love ft Kisses" 
MeC ft Irving 
Julian Hall 

PROVTDENCB 

> Kmrry 

Juggling Nelson 
Waring A Alnslee 
"Harmless Bug" 
Armstrong A James 
"Rainbow Girls" 

2d half 
Hanley Sisters 
Cook A Vernon / 
A f>tilllvnn Co 
Jack Goldie 
Girls ft Guys 
ST. LOUIS 

O snick 
Wlkl Bird 
Redman A Wells 
Mllloy Keough Co 
4 Higgle Girls 
"Girl in Basket 

2d half 
(Same as Kansas 
City 1st half) 
SPRINGFIELD 
Broadway 
Hanley Sisters 
Cook -A Vernon 
A Sullivan Co 
Jack Goldie 

2d half 
Rainbow Girls 
Waring A Alnslee 
"Harmless Bug" 
TORONTO 

Yoange 
Gallando 
Mason A Cole 
Lowe A Baker 81s 
B Swede Hall Co 
Carrofl A Coffman 
Barahan ft Grotui 



LOS ANGELES 
Paataoes 

Schepp'B Circus 
Samaroff 8 
Tetter Sextet 
Cook A Lor ens 
Arthur Lloyd 
"Girls from Starl'd" 
-.OAKLAND 
Pantagea 
(Sunday opening) 
Kelly Field Players 
Joe Darcy 

4 Rennets 

5 ft A Beverly 
Harris A Noland 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Pantages 
(Sunday opening) 
Bonesetti Tr 
SAM Laurel 
Revue De Vogue 
Long & Ward 
Frltchle 

OGDBN 
. Pantages 
(7-9) 
Lucy Valmont Co 
Rucker ft Wlnfred 



Lawrence ft Edwda 
Monroe ft Grant 
Harmony Maids 
Hager ft Goodwin 
Rhooda ft Crampton 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Pantages 
(Sunday opening) 
Empire 4 , 
Leila Shaw Co 
Cliff Clark 
Singer's Midgets 
Joe Fanton Co 

SEATTLE 

Fantagea 
Joe Jackson 
Bobble Henshaw 
The Shattucks 
Rlalto 4 
Gllraln Dancers 
Gaylord ft Herron 

SPOKANE 

Fantagea 
Imperial Quintet 
R ft K Dean 
Ray Conlln 
8 Romanoff Sis 
Little Lambs 
Florence Rayfleld 



ILKA MARIE DEEL 

la "TEARS" 

Featured » PeatfagM GUesJLt 



Martha Russell Co 
Tom Kelly 
Cp Dick's Jazz Band 
Hall ft Gullda 
PORTLAND, ORE. 

Pantages 
Primrose Minstrels 
Revue De Luxe 
Booth ft Leander 
LeRoy ft Dresner 
Crock Hunters 
REGINA, CAN. 

PAntagea 

(4-61 

(Same bill plays 

Saskatoon 7-9) 
"Oh' Billy" 
Hall ft Shapiro 
Joe Roberts - 
McLean Co 
Stagpole ft Spier 
Mozarts 

SALT LAKB 

Pantages 
Will Morris 
Maldle DeXong 
Stever ft Lovejoy 
Harris ft Mannlon 
"Some Baby" 
SAN DIBGO 

Pantages 
KnJIyama 
"Shimmy Dancers" 



Tacoinn 

Fantagea 

"Submarine F7" 
The Crom wells 
Argo & Va Sis 
Juliet Dlka 
Green ft Pugh 
"Shimmy Dancers" 
VANCOUVER, 
B. O. 
Pantages 
Bell ft Eva 
Rose Valyda 
Zlegler Twins Co 
Creamer Barton A 8 
"Studio Girls" 
VICTORIA, B. O. 

Pantaaes 
Brofllns ft Brown 
Stewart ft Olive 
"Hello People Hello" 
Ball ft West 
Richard the Great 
Dorothy Lewis 
WINNIPEG 
' Pantages 
"Oh Teddy' r 
Frank Bush 
G S Gordon Co 
Georgia Howard 
2 Fishers 
Daniels ft Walters 



Hodklm-Pantatea Bookings 



DALLAS. TEX. 
Jcffcrooa 

"Miss 1920" 
8 Weston Bis . 
Murray ft Voelk 
Duval & Lee 
Irene Trevltt 
HOUSTON, TEX. 
Prince 
Willie Bros 
Dorothy Roye 
Houch A La Veils 
Jack Merlin 
Colonls Dancers 
MUSKOflEH, 
OKLA. 
Broadway 
Harry Tauda 
Ray Lawrence 



"Riding Generation" 
Qauthler'e Toy Shop 
(One to All) 

SAN ANTONIO, 
TEX. 
Roral 
Helen Jackley 
Victoria 4 
"Telephone Tangle" 
Polly Ot ft Chick,. 
V Mercereau Co 
WACO. TEX, 
Orpfcrnra 
2d half 
Harry Tsuda 
Ray Lawrence 
"Rising Generation" 
Oauthler's Toy Shop 
(One to fill) 



ACKERMAN & HARRIS CIRCUIT 



Ban Franelece 



PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

New York and Chicago Offices 



BUTTH 
Pantages 

(»-B) 
(Same bill plays 
Anaconda 6: Mis- 
soula 7) 
Jarvls Revue 
CanAeld A Rose 
Porter J White Co 
Morak Sis 
Anita Arliss 
Al Wohlman 

CALGARY. 

Pantages 
TTyeno Japs 
Venetian Gypsies 
Sllber A North 
Lady Alice's Pets 
La Petite Elva 
Weber A Elliott 

DRNVER 

Pantages) 

Gaites Bros 
R-ath St Deals Ce 



Raee ft Edge 
Jos Reed 
Alloc Teddy Co 
Abrams ft John 
EDMONTON 
Pantages 
"Honeymoon Inn" 
Shaw ft Bernard 
Makarenka Duo 
Murry Livingston 
Austin ft Delaney 
Rials 

GT FALLS 
Pantages 

(»-«) 
(Same hill plays 

Helena 7) 
Golden Tr 
Marie Fitsstahen 
LeGrohS 
Chisholm ft green 



■AKBRSFTELD 
Hippodrome 

(••«) 
Insalla A Duffleld 
Bob Brown 

(6-7) 
JAB Arnold 
Keno ft Wagner 
Armstrong A Neville 

Arthur David 
Arthur Rlgby 
FRESNO 
Hippodrome 

Arthur Rlgby 
Arthur Edwards 
Roy Claire Co 

td half 
Fox Benson t 
Wlntergarden 4 
Hugh Johnson Co 
Roy Claire Co 
LOS ANGELES 
Hippodrome 
Ella La Vail 
Lowry's Dogs 
Tracey Palmer ft T 
Tooionlan Arabs 

2d half 
piemna V •Il*Sui 
H Johnson Co 
9 Gay Sisters 
Bob Brown 
Hans Hanke 
Whirlwind Gypsies 
SACRAMENTO 
Hippodrome 

1st half 
Church Meters 
Frank Stanley 
"Remnante" 
J ore Gelger 
ItmpeUtaa 4 



Estelle Ramsey 
Tracey Palmer ft T 
H Johnson Co 
Tooionlan Arabs 

■AN FRANCISCO 
Casino 

(Sunday opening) 
Madden 

Mclntyre ft Robbing 
Gulllana Four 
Skelly ft Helt 
C Theodoros I 
Hlapodromo 

(Sunday opening) 
Frawley ft West 
Davis A McCoy 
Logan Dunn ft H 
Mason ft Austin 
Clifford A Marsh 

STOCKTON 
Hippodrome 

J ft E Arnold 
Hugh Johnson Co 
Winter garden 4 
Armstrong A Neville 

2d half 
Mann A Mallory 
Frank Stanly 
"Remnants" 
Jore Gelger 
Neapolitan 4 
Bally Ho 8 

TAFT, CAL. 

Hippodrome 
(8) 
Hugh Johnson Co 
Hal Johnson 
Whirlwind Gypsies 

(&••) 
J ft B Arnold 



obituary: 

Carrie McManui. 
Carrie McManus (Harmon and Mc- 
Manus) died at the' West Side Hospi- 
tal, Chicago, July 27, of diabetes, aged 
30. The deceased, a member of the 
Christian Science Church, was born in 
Norway, Mich. Her last appearance on 
any stage was at the Majestic last 
week. She complained of being ill-Fri- 
day. The apt was taken off as a re- 
sult, with the Frawleys taking its place 




IN LOVING MEMORY 

of onr dear mother 

LENA KAUFMAN 

Who passed away July 22nd, 1919 
Hay her soul rest in peace 

IRVING and JACK 

KAUFMAN 






on the bill. Miss McManus was taken 
to the hospital immediately and died 
three days later. She is survived by a 
brother, Vance, and a sister, Emma. In 
addition to her vaudeville experience, 
Miss McManus played in "The Love 
Mill," "Head Over Heels" and "Yours 
Truly." An indirect-cause contributing 
to Miss McManus' death is said to have 
been a strenuous effort on her part 
to reduce weight. 



m 



' ' "'•! 



IN LOV 



lNt^lEMO 



EMORY 



■ 



of 



The Sweeteet and nearest Pal 
and Friend I ever knew. , 

CARRIE McMANUS 

Died July 17th. 1911). 

PAUL RAHN 

Jack Wilson (Roy Habberle) died 
July 26 at the Holy Family Hospital, 
Brooklyn, from the effects of a paraly- 
tic stroke. The deceased was formerly 
with Barnum & Bailey's show, but for 
the l^st few years was at Coney Island, 
where he was on exhibition with other 
Vfreaks" as "TheTat Man." His weight 
was estimated to be between 500 and 
600 pounds.. The body was shipped to 
Chicago. 

IN MEMORIAM 

JAMES H. DANCKERT 

Gave Mi life to hie eonntry, 
Jaly 19th, 1*18. A«e !>. 

' Hie Levins Slater 

ANNETTE D. DARE 



:. 1 



■I 

- . .,■■ 



George Schindler. 

George Schindler, at one time har- 
monica player in vaudeville, died at 
the State Hospital for the Insane at 
Elgin, III., July 24, of paresis. He.waeV 
55 years old. Schindler became vio- 
lently insane several month ago and 
was committed to the— asylum after; 
his friends had made efforts to effect 
a cure otherwise 

Harry Sfcappell. • 

Harry Sheppeil, of Clark and Shep- 
pell, died Tuesday morning in New 
York, after a short illness of pneu- 
monia. 

IN LOVING MEMORY 

CARRIE McMANUS 

My Departed Partner and Cham 
JOSEPHINE HARMON 

Joseph Lapcler, flyman at the Gaycty, 
Montreal, died July 19, after an illness 
of several months. The deceased wat 
58. 



The father of Caro Roma died July 
, , _, A W at.Bast Oakland, C»f. The deceased 
jSSnhSUST w«« n years- of age. 



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26 



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VARIETY 

iT 



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toy- 



LONDON SUIT BEGUN TO REGAIN 
TEN MILLION ON MOVIE PATENTS 



•54 ' 



Inventor Wat Edward Muybridge, Who Killed Harry Larkin 

in 1878. Slayer Was Let Off as Insane. His Tests 

Made Picture Camera Possible. Claims to 

Be Proved by Edison and George 

A. Lawrence. 



London, July 19. 

The sensational killing at Virginia 
City, Nevada, of Harry Larkin by 
Edward Muybridge, photographer-in- 
ventor, in 1878, a celebrated case of its 
period, promises to bang its way into 
print again through a suit just filed 
here by a self-alleged grand-nephew 
of .the killer, who seeks an accounting 
from the various owners of picture 
camera devices, and claims that Muy- 
bridge never got the portion he was 
entitled to according to certain agree- 
ments made at the time. 

Giving his name ar Eric Muybridge, 
the claimant, whose suit is being 
handled by a firm of London solicitors, 
contends that a fair division of the in- 
come from the devices in question will 
round out to more than ten million 
dollars during the quarter of a century 
that their principals have been capital- 
ized by the present and past holders 
of the world's patent rights. 

Larkin's killing followed the dis- 
covery by the inventor that the young 
and pretty wife of Muybridge was 
carrying on an affair with Larkin, a 
young newspaper man, who got _ ac- 
quainted with her while one day visit- 
ing her husband's Market street, San 
Francisco, photograph gallery, seeking 
some photographs for a story he was 
writing for the San Francisco Ex- 
aminer. 

It was Muybridge who. had finally 
settled at the time a hot controversy 
raging between Leland Stanford, then 
a California Senator, and certain physi- 
cal economists of America, with the 
question fomenting the squabble of 
the riddle up to that time of whether 
a trotting .horse ever had all its four 
feet free of the earth when in action. 
Stanford had contended that there was 
a period in the horse's flight when it 
was wholly in the air, and the scien- 
tists ridiculed the idea as against all 
laws of nature and gravity. 

It was Muy bridge's invention of a 
series of inter-related cameras, set 
shoulder to' shoulder in Golden Gate 
Park, in the California center, that 
proved Stanford right, and gave motion 
pictures its first step toward the evolu- 
tion that eventually brought today's 
perfected projecting devices. Muy- 
bridge's series of cameras were so ar- 
ranged that a trotting horse used for 
the test successively broke threads that 
released and closed the shutters of the 
battery of lenses, with the result that 
his pictures of the test, some taken at 
an exposure as sharp as one five-thou- 
sandth part of a second, showed the 
animal at one staee entirely free of 
the earth. Muybridge used more than 
a half million plates in his experiments, 
and subsequently invented and patented 
a 13-foot disc with holes set at inter- 
related intervals that, when revolved 
with co-joining photos of horses in 
action, produced the screen effect of a 
horse in motion — the first motion pic- 
ture, according to the Muybridge claim, 
and now the claim of his self-an- 
nounced nephew. I 

Eric Muybridge claims that the 
lunacy decision of the California courts 
that eventually freed Muybridge of the 
charge of murder was taken advantage 
of by certain people interested in the 
expansion of animated photography at 
the time, and that' it was the capital 
that these people made •£ the in- 



ventor's tragedy that led to the long 
continued fraud. '. 

The plaintiff mentions Thomas A. 
Edison as a witness in behalf of his 
contention, Edison having improved 
the Muybridge discoveries. Also he 
refers to George A. Lawrence, said by 
him to be the first man to tour Amer- 
ica with a motion picture entertain- 
ment, the projecting machines of which, 
the plaintiff argues, were Muybridge 
devices. This was in 1896, when * 
motion picture olio was annexed to' 
the Cyrene High-Class Vaudeville Co., 
then traveling in the States. 

SEASON'S OVERTURE IN CHICAGO. 

Chicago, July 30. 

Chicago playhouses are primed now 
for the opening of the new season. 
The Cort, Olympic, Woods, Powers', 
Blackstone, Princess and La Salle will 
start the new season with dramatic 
attractions and the Garrick, Stude- 
baker, Illinois and Auditorium an- 
nounce musical shows. 

The Cort will be the first house to 
get under way, opening Aug. 3 with 
Oliver Morosco's production of Ed- 
ward E. Rose's dramatization. of- Peter 
B. Kyne's "Cappy Ricks," with Thomas 
A. Wise in the title role. 

The Olympic will open Aug. 10 with 
Fiske 0*Hara in "Down Limerick 
Way," a typical O'Hara piece written 
by Anna Nichols. This will run two 
weeks and then the Hat tons' piece 
"Madame Sappho," starring Grace 
Valentine, goes in. 

The Woods' theatre lights up Aug. 
17 with "Up In Mabel's Room," with 
Hazel Dawn and Walter Jones in the 
cast. "Take It From Me" goes into 
the Studebaker August 17, with Zoe 
Barnett as prima donna. Powers' the- 
atre will begin its season Aug. 24 with 
"Three Wise Fools." Aug. 24 will see 
the opening of the^ Garrick with 
"Sometime." The Princess takes a 
brief excursion into movies and opens 
Aug. 31 with Mark Swan's farce 
"Keep it to Yourself," with Ethel 
Stannard and Edward Nicander. On 
the same day "Listen Lester" opens 
at the Illinois, with Gertrude Vander- 
bilt and Ada Lewis in the cast. "On 
the Firing Line" opens the Blackstone 
Aug. 31. 

The La Salle is due to open Sept. 27 
with Roi Megue Cooper's 'Tea For 
Three," with Arthur Byron, Frederick 
Perry and Elsa Ryan in the cast. "Oh, 
Look." with the Dolly Sisters, goes 
into the Auditorium October 12 for a 
three weeks' run for the annual benefit 
of the Chicago Police Benevolent As- 
sociation. 

The Palace will reopen its vaudeville 
season in four weeks. . Midway of 
August will see the reopening of the 
Columbia, Star & Garter, Englewood 
and Crown theatres. The Kedzie, 
American and Lincoln will open the 
last half of the week of Aug. 25, and 
the National, Imperial and Victoria— 
the "subway circuit" houses— will open 
about the same time. 

Only two attractions are not booked 
to close in Chicago at the present 
time. There are "Prince There Was," 
with Grant Mitchell, at the Grand, and 
"Angel Face" at the Colonial. 

This week "I Love You" closed at 
the Cort and the Griffith picture closed 
at the Illinois. 



COMING ROCHESTER CONVENTION. 

Rochester, July 30V 
-When the National Association of 
the Motion Picture Industry comes 
here Aug. 5-6 for their third annual 
meeting the indications are that it will 
be the most memorable gathering of 
that body. Since the -birth of the asso- 
ciation in June, 1916, several important 
gatherings have been held, but the 
outlook is that next week's event will 
see the transaction of more important 
busines, hear things of more vital in- 
terest to. the industry and be attended 
by more members than ever before. 

Each branch of the industry will 
have previously held meetings in New 
York and nominated directors to be 
elected at the Rochester meeting. 
President William A. Brady will pre- 
side and various committees appointed 
earlier in the year will present their 
reports. < The work of the past year 
will be reviewed, plans will be pre- 
sented for the work of the coming 
year and officers will be elected. 

The association comes to Rochester 
at the invitation of George Eastman, 
head of the Eastman Kodak Co., whose 
guest the members will be from the 
time they leave New York until their 
return to that city. Elaborate plans 
are now being perfected for their com- 
fort, convenience and pleasure, and it 
is evident *h>t the screen magnates 
will have no cause to question the 
quality pf the hospitality extended 
them. 

A special train, chartered by Mr. 
Eastman, will leave the Grand Central 
Station at 11:30 on Monday night, 
arriving in Rochester shortly after 8 
o'clock on Tuesday morning. The 
members will be taken to the_Hotel 
Seneca, where they will be quartered 
and where their meetings will take 
place. After breakfast the sessions 
will be opened in the ball room on the 
second floor. 

Tuesday afternoon the members will 
be taken to Kodak Park, where they 
will have a chance to see, just how 
film is made. After being shown many 
of the wonders of this great plant they 
will be the guests in the evening at 
a dinner which will be served in the 
dining hall at the park. Several other 
entertainment functions are being 
worked out, which will fill the time 
of the visitors to capacity, and inci- 
dentally leave a lasting impression of 
the Kodak City. The party will re- 
turn to New York on a special train 
which will leave Rochester on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, following the Em- 
pire State Express. 

It is generally understood that Mr. 
Eastman will take the opportunity to 
announce his plans in regard to the 
National Academy of Motion Picture 
Art which he proposes to found. This 
subject 'has been a most interesting 
one for gossip for some months past, 
but no definite announcement as to 
the scope and plans of the institution 
has been made by Mr. Eastman. 
Hence, there is more than a little 
curiosity on the subject and many 
conjectures have been freely made as 
to what Mr. Eastman actually pro- 
poses to do. 

Samuel Rothapfel is slated to be one 
of the men' who will guide the desti- 
nies of the proposed academy. 



Mercedes Road Show Open Sept. 7. 

Chicago, July 30. 

The Mercedes Road Show will open 
at Toledo, Sept. 7, with Joe Connolly 
as general manager and three men 
ahead. The show will play full weeks 
at K. & E. houses. There are 25 in the 
cast 

The second part of the show will 
be called "The Pearl of Persia," pro- 
duced by Mercedes, who will also take 
part in it 

IP YOU DONT ADVERTISE IN VARIETY— 
DON'T ADVERTISE 



■MM. 

JAPAN CUTTIN& OUT "KISSES." 

There isn't going to be any more 
"Con no nochee" ("That Night") or 
"Kiss me I" titles of action precipitat- 
ing them in any pictures shown in Ja- 
pan hereafter, whether shipped from 
America or any other country, the 
Peace Treaty, notwithstanding. Japan 
is all fed upon the sex freedom of its 
civilized- white races outside the Oc- 
cidental pale of morals and manners 
between men and women or girls and 
boys, and henceforth ''the Japanese 
censors "will not even bother about 
trying to cut. out the - objectionable 
scenes or titles, but will ship the films 
back to their senders. 

The information is included among 
a dossier of general specifications 
from Japan's present government re* 
ceived last week in Washington and 
designed to further enhance the. en- 
tente cordiale between the two coun- 
tries. Kissing in public in Japan it 
snickersnee stuff, and where the dis- 
covered culprits aren't rushed instant- 
ly to the stocks or garrote or par- 
boiled in goose grease, are bawled out 
somethin' orful in the court sessions 
general. . 

In the nine months ending June 5 
last, the police censors of Japan re- 
moved 3^59 kisses from films shipped 
to Japan from the U. S. Only one kiss 
was allowed to remain of all the 
busses slipped into the land of rice 
and flowers, and that the kiss slipped 
to Columbus by Isabella in a photo- 
play called "Columbus.'' 

Up to the date named covering the 
same period 528 embraces were scis- 
sored from the imported celluloid. 
Similarly, 3,504 titles of amorous direc- 
tion were altered. Of film reels 
shipped from the U. S., 97 were turned 
back entirely because of torrid love 
making. 

In one case a shipment of Theda 
Bara films was ordered kept aboard 
the vessel that brought them to port 
at Tokio, while an Annette Kellerman 
"Neptune's Daughter** shipment was 
instantly impounded upon arrival and 
ordered deported. r 

MODIFYING "VOLCANO." 

When the Harry Raver production 
of Augustus Thomas' "The Volcano," 
the anti-Bolshevism drama, starring 
Leah Baird, was exhibited at a private 
showing before two score editors, 
dramatic critics and leading represen- 
tatives of the Jewish race in this city, 
last week, it. was quite a change from 
the original version shown at the 
Washington Press Club before the 
local newspapermen, ten days before. 

It was as a result of this exhibition 
that 'The Day," a local Yiddish daily 
of national circulation, was apprised 
by its Washington correspondent, Rue- 
ben Fink, that the propaganda set 
forth, while serving its purpose to its 
fullest measure, was none too com- 
plimentary to their race and might 
be misconstrued as being anti-Semitic 
propaganda. 

William Edlin, the editor of the 
daily, knowing that the character 
drawing and the strongly Semitic sur- 
names, would do more harm than 
good, interviewed the author, the pro- 
ducers, Gov. Smith, who ^endorsed the 
film and who appears in one scene 
(mainly out of- personal friendship to 
his friend, Mr. Thomas, as he stated) 
and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 
-Franklin p. Roosevelt, who had also 
lent official endorsement to the pro- 
duction, all of whom immediately did 
all in their power to make amends. 
The latter two officials withdrew their 
backing, Mr. Thomas lending the hero, 
a captain in the Intelligence Depart- 
ment, a Jewish surname — Nathan 
Levinson— and inserting a title to 
show that the role of Minsky, the 
chief Second avenue bomb thrower 
and anti-government plotter, was not 
representative of the race and in fact 
was not a member of the people as 
his last name strongly suggested. 



T^r-.^—^ ~-7»:W-^ ■ 



J*a±<l)ilfr4Wr->i.-*!iiZ£t 









^VARIETY 



•^p^^^i^ 



U?>V: 






FEDERAL INVESTIGATION 

Oanatnaailon from lait week ef tbe verbatim teatl- 
ra**y U the prwceedinga erf the Federal Trade Com- 
mldefcra ia Ike matter of the vaudeville Investigation. 

Hit resort below is of the proceedings 

- Friday, May 23 (Continued) 

TV» hasurkag waa wumul, purauant to notice, before 
OMflea I. Moore, Eiq. 

at heretofore noted, 

MICHAEL R. SHEEDY 

Q. Tou seem to be a very ready and willing witness to 
testify to anything that you thing might hurt the respondents, 
hut you are not so ready to testify to anything that might 
hurt yourself T 
A, lam not here on trial. / • 

Q. Tou are, so far as I am concerned. 
A. Well, get your witnesses out. 

Examiner Moore: Now, gentlemen, let ua have leas argur 
menu - / 

The Witness: I am not going to testify against myself If I 
am on trial. 1 don't have to. 
Examiner Moore: Answer the questions, If you can. 
By Mr. Goodman: 

Q. The question was whether when you booked through the 
William Morris Agency you deducted commissions from the 
salaries of the actors aa provided in the contracts made be- 
tween you and the actors? 

A. What you want to find out la when I booked through 
William Morris— 
Q. Just make a direct answer. Don't argue. 
A. I don't, understand his question thoroughly. I would 
like to understand the question thoroughly and then I can 
answer. - ■ 

Q. Did you deduct William Morris' commissions from the 
actors' salaries. . 

A. (Mr. Morris drew up the contracts and got the actors 
for me. 

Q. Did you deduct commissions from actors' salaries and 
Ben* the same to Mr. Morris for his commission T 
A. Certainly. ") 

Q. And didn't yon retain several hundred dollars of com- 
missions belonging to Mr. Morris, his moneys, and was he not 
compelled to sue you to recover that amount? 
A. Tou ought to know, you were my lawyer. 
Q. What la that? 

A. Tou were my lawyer; you tried the case. 
Q. It was tried out in court, wasn't It? 
A. Didn't yon try It T 
Q. Please answer my question. 
A. Tea. _ 

Q. Those moneys were moneys that belonged to William 
Morris, were they not? • 

A. Why ask such questions? Tou were my lawyer. 
Q. I am asking them, just the same. 
A. Tea. . -..-- 

Mr. Walsh: Did you keep his money? 
The Witness: No, I paid him his money. 
By Mr. Goodman: -"' 

Q. Tou paid after you lost? 
A. Tea. , 

Q. And they were commissions that were due Mr. Morris, 
were they not? 
A. Tea. sir. i -. 

Q. Then when you told Mr. Walsh you paid, you meant you 
paid after the court required you to pay? 
A. Tea. Tou were my lawyer. 

Q. That ia quite right, and your case was tried out in open 
eourt before a Jury?' 
A. Tea, air. 

Q. There was no secret about that, was there? 
A. No, air. 

Q. Tou testified tn direct examination that Fay's house 
played six acta a week. 
A. Tea, sir. 

Q. And you said that you some weeks booked as many as 
forty acts? 
A. Tea, air. 
Q. Well, now— 

A. That is, we got the promise of forty acta. We would 
wind up with about three or four. 
Q. Tou got the promise of forty? 
A. Tee»- 

Q. Then you don't mean you contracted them? 
A. Tea, verbal contracts. ■ 
W. Tou had verbal contracts with forty? 
A If an actor aaya he will go to work for you, that la a 
verbal contract, lent It? 

Q. Did you contract with forty acts in any one week to 
play Fay's theatres? 

A. We had controversies and discussions and tried to get 
aa high as forty acta to play there in a week and we would 
anally wind up with three. We had no written contract 
Partly promises and all that kind of stuff. 

Q. Was there any week that Fay only had three acts 
appearing on the bill in his theatre? 

A. No, I guess the least was four. I don't think we got 
down as fine aa three. 
Q. How many times was that that U got down to four? 
A. I don't remember. 
Q. Would you say ottener than twice? - 
Q. Quite often. 

Q. Would you say it was as often as ten times? 
A. I cannot remember. 
Q. How la your booking business, good? 
A. No, it Is bad. 
Q. Been bar! all the time? 
A. Mostly all the time. 
Q. Not making any money? 
A. Very little. 

Q. But you are making money, though little? 
A. Little. 

Q. I show you this contract and ask you if that Is the form 
of contract used by the Independent Booking Agency when 
vou were president of it (showing paper to witness) ? 
A. Tea. 

Q. I notice at the lower left hand corner of this contract 
.the words, "Approved and published by the White Rats of 
America, 1663 Broadway." That was a fact, wasn't It, that 
that form was approved? 
A. I imagine it was so, yes. 

Q. And was used with authority by your agency at that 
time? Tou would not have used this form unless that were 
true, would you? 
A. No. 

Q. This statement here, "All engagements placed under the 
contract are subject to 6 per cent, commission." That raters 
to the 5 per cent, that was paid by the actor to the Inde- 
pendent Booking Agency, does it hot? 
A. Tea, air. 

Mr. Goodman: I offer this In evidence. 
(The paper above referred to waa received and marked 
■ aatjo i dent't Exhibit No. 113.) 



Q. Ia Mr. Fay a stockholder of the Bheedy Agency, or are 
any of his aasoolatea stockholders of the Sheedy Agency, or Is 
Mr. Fay or any of bis associates interested in a financial way 
in the Sheedy Agency? 

A. I refuse to answer unless the Referee wants me to answer 
It. 

Examiner Moore : He can rightfully refuse on account of not 
having that knowledge. 

Mr. Goodman: He haa not suggested that, Mr. Examiner, 
that he did not have any knowledge. He said he refused to 
answer 

The Witness : The Sheedy Vaudeville Agency Is not on trial 
in this thing. Now, you called me up here aa a witness to tell 
what I know In regard to different affairs. I am here to 
answer any questions regarding the Bheedy Vaudeville Agonoy. 
Examiner Moore: If it Is within your knowledge, I think 
you could answer It properly. 

The Witness : I could, but I object to answering it unless you 
force me to answer it. 

Examiner Moore: I guess you better answer It. I think 
the question is proper. I would like to convince counsel that 
they should not Insist on matters of a private nature that might 
be the means of injuring this man. 

Examiner Moore: Tou have got to give private information 
In every lawsuit 

The Witness: They are not-suing me. I am no criminal, I 
am not here on trial. But to save all arguments and to show 
you I don't care when I know that is Just what they are driving 
at, there is nobody connected in the show business that has 
got any interest in that agency, that Is .connected with the 
show business in the known wide world, so that takes In you 
and Mr. Fay and everybody else. So If that will do them any 
good, I "am. not entitled to Answer the question at that, not 
according to law. 

Examiner Moore : I am afraid according to law, you are re- 
quired to answer it. Tou have answered. 

REDIRECT EXAMINATION 
By Mr. Walsh: 

Q. Let me ask you, Mr. Bheedy, when the Independent 
Booking Agency was running, was It not the main idea that 
only 6 per cent, should be collected from the actor? 
A. What was that? 

Q, When the Independent Booking Agency was operating, 
wasn't it the mean idea that only 5 per cent, should be col- 
lected from the actor? 

A Ygs sir * *- 

- Q. And' that la all the commission he would pay? 
A Tea sir. 

q! And' that was paid to the booking agency? 
A. Practically, that la what the Independent Booking Agency 
was started for, was a satisfactory arrangement so there would 
not be only 6 per cent on account of the extreme graft that 
was going on lathe show business previous to that time. 

Q. And when did the Independent Booking Agency operate. 
in "what years? 
A. That contract will tell you. , 
Q, Was It from 1809 tolOli? 
A. Just about that time. 

Q. Wa3 there an agreement between the Independent Book- 
ing Office and the White Rats that they should arbitrate ail 
their differences and a bond given to guarantee such arbitra- 
tion? 

A. I believe there was some arrangement of that kind. I. 
just don't remember the details of It 

Q. Was It not understood at that time that it waa a broach 
of agreement, of the agreement that existed between the White 
Rata and the Independent Booking Agency for actors to em- 
ploy outside agents? 

A. Was there any agreement between the White Rata and 
the agency as to what? 

Q. Between the White Rata and the booking agency that 
the actor should not employ an agent, an outside agent, a 

personal representative? 

A; To my knowledge, there was not any agreement of that 
kind tolerated. It wan not entertained at all. Aa president, 
I would not entertain such a proposition anyhow, it I had 
anything to say about It 

Q. Was it understood that in dealing with your agenoy 

A. The Independent Agenoy. 

Q. The Independent Agency, the actor was not to employ a 
personal representative or agent but he was to book direct, 
and the only fee that the actor should pay at all of his 
booking or employment of any kind for all purposes would be 
only 5 per cent? I understand they pay 10 per cent now, 6 
per cent to the agent and 6 per cent to the booking office. 
A. Yes, that is common. ■. 

Q. What waa the situation with the Independent Booking 
Office? 

A. There waa not anything In particular of any nature of 
that kind came up that I remember of. Of course, a man 
running a booking agenoy would rather book an actor direct 
than he would book it through a personal representative 
because he naturally could get the actor a little cheaper, 
because the personal representative would get a certain per- 
centage and that would come out of the manager, It would 
not come out of the actor. 

Q. .But that was the object of this independent booking office, 
that the actor should book direct? 

A. Direct as much as possible, but we did book through 
personal representatives. 

Q. And there were some of the representatives of the White 
Rats who were objecting to that weren't there? 

A. Some of the members of the White Rats were objecting 
to what? 

Q. To-having the actors employing an agent to book through 
the Independent Booking Agency? 
A. That might be amongst themselves. 
Q. But was there any objection made to you? 
A. I would not entertain such an objection. I don't remem- 
ber of. any such an objection. 

Q. Was there any other statement that you wanted to make 
here, Mr. Sheedy? 

A. To tell you the truth, I don't know. It you want to 
know anything in particular, I would only be too glad to 
tell you. 

Q. Ae I understand, you are running your booking agency 
in opposition to the U. B. 0., now the B. F. Keith Vaudeville 
Exchange? 
A. Tee. 

Q. Tou are booking in your agenoy the same actors that 
are booked by the U. B. 0.? 

A. That is a bard question to answer. Tou take an actor 
who has worked for the U. B. O. until they have worked 
out their usefulness, then, of course, ..p.turally, they would 
come to our agency. Or, In other words, actors that were 
working our agency, the majority of them would be actors 
that the U. B. 0. would not know anything about find new 
acta, tryouts, and all that stuff. 
Q. Isn't that the kind of acts you generally booked? 
A. Those are the kind of acta we generally booked. That 
we book as a rule, but we book other acts, too. It is sort 
of a combination. The circumstances of booking that makes 
it a very complicated affair for anybody to understand that Is 
not In the buelnesa, Now, for instance, If you are wearing - 
a good suit' of clothes and you get tired of them and you throw 
them away, somebody else Is liable to wear them. That is 
the kind of acts we book at times. Then, of course, some 
acts the United Booking Offices don't know anything about. 
Sometimes we pick up acta that are amateurs and cabaret 
singers and stuff like that, that wa book, and thea, of course, 
ws get what you s ail re gular*. 



iicfo.jl 



Q. What is a regular? , 

A. A regular would be a standard act, what you would call 
a standard net would be an act worth $300, with two or three ' 
people, and work everywhere, could get work any time they 
want it. •'•-: •"" .-'■>■■ .•■''.; 

Q. At the U. B, O. or anywhere else? ' ' 

A Of finvwticrG c\ s g '■* 

Q." Generally, you don't book acta that are booking regularly 
with theU. B. O.? ;:..-.. 

A. No. v".\}'- 

Q. Why la that? 

A. Up to six months ago we have not been getting quite good 
acts. We ara talking how on something previous to six ' 
months ago. Up to six or eight months ago since this investiga- 
tion started, we had no trouble about getting any kind of . . 

acts. '-. •:■ ". . r : - -:;.: -. • ■_■■■-, ■'-.■- -. •■.-.' , -. :.::■. _:__'. 

Q. Whether they worked for the TJ. B. 07 6r~notT"~^' —r-^- 
A. Whether thoy worked for the U. B. O. or anybody else. '■"*:* 
Mr. Walsh : That la all. - &Z^^r*&ii*&. 

RECR038 EXAMINATION 
By Mr. Goodman : -'■' 

Q. Tou don't book any two-a-day houses, do you, so-called 
big time? 
A, Not now, no. 

Q. And during this trouble that you spoke of you did not 
book any big time houses, did you? .V<~ 

A. What trouble? •".»-. ,.-■., 

Q. What we were talking about here, Fay in Providence? • '< 
A. No. Fay done three-a-day, 

Q. These acts that you booked during that period, however, 
played on the Loew Circuit did they aot, oh the Moss Circuit, 
and Fox and Pantages ; in other words, they booked other small- ------ 

time, didn't they? ■ ..,■ '■-.. 

A. What acts? "YJ; -rj 

Q. The acts you booked for Fay? .;.■;-:• 

• A. Some of them, yes. •.••":"' 

* Q. Have you kept track of where the acta played after they ■ 
left Fay 'a? * ••■;-.-.---■ - 

A. No, I had no further Interest in them. ."- v ; 

Q. Ia It not a fact that a great number of acta that played, 
for Fay in Providence played over the United Booking Offlcea' - : 
small time within a week or a month of the time they played 
for Fay In Providence? .'-.-:;>• 

A. Not previous to this investigation, no. 

Q. Tou say that positively, without any reservation, that ■■ 
they did not play in United Booking Offlce houses within one 
week in some cases and within a month after they appeared , 
In Fay'a in Prov!dence?-v - v,., 

A. I tell you I don't know what happened to them after : 
they played In Providence. - ;; -• 

Q. Than your answer Is you don't know what happened to ■':.- 
thorn after they played in Providence? ' .. - '■'■'■ 

A. Tee, sir. . J" ..v''.^ -■•>• 

Mr. Goodman: That ia all. . '■•'.,'■;'■; 

HENRY CHESTERFIELD 

Was recalled as a witness, and, having beon previously sworn, uu^ 
testified as follows : . ■■-■■%?' 

DIRECT EXAMINATION: £ i : 

By Mr. Walsh: '■.-.:.■.::■;.:::■ J. jj?'l±m 

(J. Mr. Chesterfield, I show you what Is page 17 ot Vajubtt ''y^ 
lor Friday, February 10. 1018, which purporta to be a notice .?.; 
signed by David Stelnbardt counsel, under the heading of ' : '~ 
National Vaudeville Artists, Inc., and ask you if that waa •' 

an authorized publication or advertisement of the National 
Vaudeville Artists? 

A. yes. sir, It is. , 

Q. And on the lower right-hand corner appears to be 
application blank of the Notional Vaudeville Artiste? 

A. Tea, sir. 

Q. And is that the regular and usual form that is 
application? 

A. That waa, at that time. 

Q. Has it been changed since? 

A. Siightly, in order to get more Information. 
Q. What information further do you require now? . 

A. We have the color in the new application blank.- -.='-- 

Q. That Is, you mean the color of the applicant whether 
white, black, brown, etc.? ! . • - -,■ ,--■•£■ .„ 

A. Yes, sir. And also we have another line Inserted as to &jm 
whore they want their card sent ; --.v; '■ '-!'-#> 

Q. Their card of membership? 
■ A. Membership. :■'■•"- .-.; txia 

Q. Who designed the applljation? r Vi 

A. I have to take part responsibility In that ■''••£■¥% 

Q. When was the application form changed? '"'-,''• '-v/.w' 

A. Within two years, possibly. A year and a-half, or two 
years. • 

Q. Ia Mr. David Stelnbardt atlll the counsel for 
Vaudeville Artists? . . 

A. No, sir. he is not 

Q. When did he cease to be counsel for the National Vaude- -. -^,''i ■% 
ville Artiste? . ~ 

A. I cannot tell you exactly. 

Q. Who Is the counsel now? -._-..?'. '.-.: i- 

A. We have no regular counsel. Whenever we need the 
services of counsel we have sent for Mr. StelohardL In fact, 
we have turned over cases to other lawyera. 

Q. But you generally employ Mr. Stelnhardt? V * 

A. Generally. • ' ' ■ . ■ ' ■'':'"> : s'S 

Q. This notice of May 10, 1016, on page IT of the Issue of ' 
May 10, of Variety, provides that amon? the purposes of the 
organization will be the following: "First, drafting of an 
equitable contract to be used by all managers In the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Association, which comprises all the targe 
vaudeville circuits." Was such an equitable contract drafted? 

A. Yea, sir. 

Q. What were the general features of the equitable contract 
which was drafted? I will ask you first, when was that 
equitable contract Issued? 

A. Right after tho Issuance of a charter to the National 
Vaudeville Artists. 

Q. Do you have a form ot the contract? 

A. I don't know whether— 

Q. Is that the form of contract which ia now used by the 
B. F. Keith Vaudeville Exchange, which waa the U. B. O.? 

A. I must seo It before I can tell you. . '*'-,■'• 

Q. Do you know whether all these booking agencies, the B. 
F. Keith, the Moss and the Loew, use the same form ot con- 
tract? • ■ 

A. No, I don't believe they all use tho same form ot contract, 
I think each agency has Its own form. 

Q. But do they all of them have in them the features of 
the so-called equitable contract of tho National Vaudeville 
Artists? 

A. Tes, sir. They have. 

Q. I show you what purporta to be an application for 
membership In tho National Vaudeville Artists and ask you 
If that Is the form in use (showing paper to wltneaa)? 

A. That la tbe present form In use, yes. sir. 

Q— When was this present form adopted? • ' 

A. I think that must be In operation atnee the Initiation 
has been placed In force. It Is poailbly a year ago. 

Q. Here le a question, "Who Is your representative, If any?" 
What Is tho object of that information? 

A. Well, If we receive news, wo will say, of tbe death of 

one of our members and we are unable to locate him through 

tbe trade papers or throuxh an address that we may bavsV It la 

quite possible If we have their representative's name, the r*»re> 

.. eentatlve has them booked in soma house that we knew ia 



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VARIETY 









respect thereof, and we can get In touch with him. 

Q. Here Is another question) "Have you been at any time, 
or are you a member of any other theatrical organization, and 
if bo state the names thereof." What is the object of that 
inquiry T 

A. Partly to get a line whether they were vaudeville per- 
formers, dramatic- performers, or Just in the business. tor the 
social end of It. 

Q. When did you first become associated with this pro- 
posed organisation, tho National Vaudeville Artists? 

A. From its Inception. ► ". < 

Q. From its inception T 

A. Tea, sir. 

Q. Are you one of the incorporators? 

A. I am one of the incorporators. 
■ Q. How did you come to be one of the incorporators? 

A. Mr. Ed. Leonard, Mr. Will Herbert and myself were talk- 
ing at that time about the advisability of forming another 
organisation. We knew that the White Rats were having 
trouble. We realized at that time that the managers were not 
recognizing that organization. We talked the matter oyer 
and went to see Mr. Murdock, the three of us, and we asked 
Mr. Murdock If another organization was formed would they 
give that organization consideration that this White Rats 
organization would not have. He wanted to know In what 
way, how do you mean form an organization? We said If we 
got an organization that the managers would go flfty-flfty 
with the performers would they in any way help ua organise 
such an association? He would not give any definite answer. 
Two or three days later I saw him again. He evidently thought 
the matter over. He said not only would they recognize a body 
of actors who were willing to work In harmony with man- 
agers, but be said be would see that the managers would also 
help thoBe actors. The outcome was that we applied for a 
charter through David Stelnhardt. The- first charter was . 
denied, due to the fact tt was called the American Vaudeville 
Artists' Association, and we were given to understand that 
another application had been made years prior under the same 
title. So then we called it the National Vaudeville Artists, 
and on May 1, 1916, a charter was Issued to us. 

Q. Your committee, never talked to Mr. Albee about It? 

A. No, sir. 
. Q, In this notice In Variety of May 17,-1918. there is this 
statement : "As soon as the committee or charter members of 
this Association have worked out the details, a general meeting 
of all members will be called at a place in the City of New 
York of which due notice will be given for the purpose of 
adopting by-laws and electing officers and directors of the 
organization and all other details of final organization." Was 
such a general meeting held? 

A. Yes, sir. ■ - 

Q. And notice given? -* 

A. You are reading from the same? 

Q. Yes? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. A notice was given? 

A. Yes, sir. * ^ 

Q. At that time the officers were elected? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. They were elected by vote? 

A. By the vote of those present • .' 

Q. How many were present? — 

A. Our. charter members, and I presume a half-dozen others, 
because that Is all there were at that time. 

Q. At that time you were elected secretary and Mr. Leonard 
was elected president and Miss May Irwin was elected treas- 
urer? 

A. Not at that time, no, sir. * v 

Q. I show you page 13 of Variety dated May 26, 1916, which 
purports to be an advertisement entitled, "For Peace and 
Prosperity Forevermore." Signed by the National Vaudeville 
Artists, Inc., 1498 Broadway, New York City. I will ask 
you whether or not that advertisement was inserted by the 
National Vaudeville Artists? 

A. That date Is what? 

Q. May 26th. 



A. That must be wrong. 

Q. It la 1918. I will ask you if that mi aa authorised 

Insertion by the National Vaudeville Artist*? 

A. Yes, sir. 

CROSS-EXAMINATION. 

By Mr. Malevlnaky: 
- Q. Mr. Chesterfield, these advertisements that appear In 
Variety, Is It not true that substantially all of those advertise- 
ments appeared In other trade papers? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. There wss no preference shown, was there, In Inserting 
these advertisements? ■ 

A. No, air. 

Q. By your association? 

A. No, sir. 

Q. Variety sent out a certain copy of a letter In respect to 
a special number, do you remember that? 

A. I do. 

Q. Do you remember the circumstances of their using a 
certain form and your insisting that they change the form of 
their letter? . . - 

A. I believe I do, yes, sir. 

In respect to this special issue, isn't It a fact that other 
papers, trade papers, took exception to the fact of Variety get- 
ting out a special Issue and that others got out — 

A. Well, all the trade papers I believe at that time got out 
a special issue. 

Q. Did your association or organisation at any time show 
any favorites to Variety? 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. You Inserted ads in that paper as you did In other papers! 

A. No, sir. 

Q. If Variety for any reason has a stronger status or stand- 
ing as a trade paper that Is i. matter that has come to It 
through Its years of successful publication, is it not? 

A. Well, of -course, each paper baa Its own following. 

Q. Well now, as a matter of fact among vaudevlillans gen- 
erally, isn't it true that the majority of vaudevlillans consider 
Variety the best trade paper? 

A. They consider Variety the most popular paper. 

Q. Variety first originated this idea of a personal, more of 
a personal line? 

A. Ab far as I know, Variety was the first to publish an 
intimate line. > 

Q. And by reason of that it got to be a great favorite among 
those who were interested in vaudeville affairs? 

A Yes, sir. 

Q. In all of your connection with this National Vaudeville 
Association have you ever beard or known, of any agreement 
or understanding of any kind with Mr. Silverman or with 
Variety whereby Variety was any part of any arrangement 
to fight the White Rats, or anybody else? 

A. I have not, no sir. - \ 

Q.Asa matter of fact. Variety lost a great deal of adver- 
tising at the time that the other papers contended that they 
should have the privilege of using a special number, didn't 
they; that Is, a great many advertisements were taken away 
from Variety and given to the other papers? 

A Why, yes, because naturally it is rather hard for the 
majority of the performers to utilize all the trade papers. 
Some give their ads to one paper and some to another, and 
yet all the trade papers carried a large amount of individual 
performer's ads. 

Q. Have you ever undertaken, you or your association, the 
National Vaudeville Association, have yoji ever undertaken In 
any manner, way, shape or form to steer,' if I may use that 
term, or direct any business to Variety as against any other 
trade paper or magazine or Journal? 

A. No, sir, I have not, 

Q. When you got out a programme in connection with the 
first special edition, there was some controversy or some issue 
between you and Variety In respect to taking away part of 
their profits, wasnt there? 

A. There certainly was. 

Q. So that the next year when you insisted upon putting 
out your programme they never got out a special Issue? 



A. Well, I guess they didn't want to. 

Q. Didn't they claim that they had lost 116,000 by 
of that first opecial issue? . \ 

A. That is the statement they told me. Of course, we don't 
know how true that was. 

Q. Anyhow, they contended that? 

A. They contended that thty lost $16,000 on that issue. 

Mr. Walsh: That Is, they did not lose It, they did not 
get It. ■ . I ' 

The Witness: I don't know what they got, whether they 
lost It or did hot get It 

By Mr. Malevlnsky: J ... . ..J-- 

Q. Didn't they contend to you that it was useles for them 
to get out a special issue because they could not make It payf 

A. Yes, sir. 

Q. And the next year they abandoned It altogether? 
..->■_ yes, sir. '•«" V ' ' ." 'fik ■ jt£.. ;.• ,-,'.' j i . v.; 

Mr. Malevlnsky : That "is all. 

By Mr. Walsh: — „ 

Q. Why should Variety go to you about it, Mr. Chesterfield? 

A. Because the other papers were speaking about having a 
special Issue and we naturally would like ali papers interested. 

(Whereupon, at 12 :50 o'clock P. M„ a recess was taken until 
2:00 o'clock P. M.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION. 



PATRICK J- CASEY 

Was recalled for further oxamlpatlon, and having been prev- 
iously sworn, testified ss follows: 

DIRECT EXAMINATION. - _' 

By Mr. Walsh: . _.„ \L' 

Q. Before we call Mr. Clark, Mr. Casey I will ask you who 
owns Kenney's Theatre, in Newark, New Jersey. 

A. I believe Keeney does. :•'/'.. J . 

q. Frank Keeney? '. V • " 

A. Frank Kenney; yes, sir. ;. ' 

q. Is he a member of the V. M. P. A.? 

A. Yes. 



WILLIAM E. CLARK 

Was called as a witness on behalf of the Commission, and was 
duly sworn. 

It is admitted that the witness William E. Clark, an 
examiner of the Federal Trade Commission, on the 23d day 
of May, 1919, visited Keeney's Theatre, Newark, N. J„ a 
theatre owned by Frank Keeney, a member of the V. M. P; A..' 
and was admitted by the State Manager John Rowe to two of 
the nine dressing rooms In that theatre. Upon the wall in 
each of the two dressing rooms which he visited he found 
prominently displayed a placard about six by eight inches, 
on which was printed the following notice : 

"All members of the N. V. A. kindly present their cards, 
Stage Manager, on request" In one of the rooms there were 
two such -notices on the wall Tho Stage Manager would 
not permit blm to take possession of one of these notices, 
stating that It was beyond his authority, but Informed Will- 
lam E. Clark that similar notices could be found In each of 
tue dressing rooms. 

Mr. Walsh : That Is all, Mr. Clark. 

HENRY CHESTERFIELD 

Was recalled as a witness, and having been previously sworn, 
testified as follows : ■ . ' 

DIRECT EXAMINATION (Continued). 

By Mr. Walsh: 

q. I understand your testimony to be that the advertisement 
entitled, "Peace and Prosperity Forevermore," dated May 26, 
1916, appeared under the direction of the National Vaudeville 
Artists at that time? 

A. Yes, sir. 

(To be continued next week) 



BACK ON THE JOB FOR BUSINESS 



JOE MANN 

TO THE PROFESSION 

Arrived back in New York this week and am now organizing several new revues for New York and vicinity. 

Principals and Chorus Girls Needed at Once 

Phone: Circle 5982 CALL - 'PHONE - WRITE 1664 Broadway, New York 



LETTERS 

When sending for mail to VARIETY, 
address Mall Clerk. 

POSTCARDS, ADVERTISING OR 
CIRcn.An LETTERS WILL NOT BE 
ADVERTISED. 

LHTTERS ADVERTISED IN ONE 
ISSUE ONLY. 



Abbott Grace 
Albert Nat 
Alls Roscoe 
Albrugbt Fannie 
Andrea Slgna 
Aqulla Prince 
Arthur Dorothy 



B 

Baker Marlon 
Baxter ft Virginia 
Bellltt Henry 
Belmont Murray 
Berry David 
BeBt Bert 
Blondel! Edw 



Bond Austin 
Bonnervllle T D 
Brenner August 
Bronson Phil 
Brown George 
Burns Billy 
Burroughs W S 

C 
Callaban CAB 
Caplane ft Wells 
Carleton Robert 
Carpenter Edlon C 
Carlyle Louise 
Carr Fred 
Carter Rose 
Csrty James 
Chappelle Thomas 
Chappoll ft Stlnette 
Chesney Jayne 
Chllds Jeanette 
Christy Csrl J 
Clair. Doris 



Claire Gladys 
Clark Miss 
Clarks Marie 
Clark ft Bergman 
Cllne George 
Cohen Ralph 
Colin ft Dnnabr 
Collum Edwin 
Cone Joseph 
Connell Teddy 
Connelly T 
Cooke W H 
Conroy John 
Cooper Irving 
Cronell Francis 
Corrlgan Emmett 
Crawford Clifton 
Crawford Loiter 
Creighton Jim 
Cromwell Mm Louis 
Cummlngham ft Ben- 
nett 



Curtis Julia 
Curtis Sam 
Cushman Jack 

D 
Dale Billy 



Diver Jean, 
Daly Arnold 
De Haven vMilo 
Dickey Paul 
Dickinson ft Deagon 



Dixon George 
Dixie Duo 
Donobue Mary 
Dorothy Miss 
Doraldina Mme 



Draper Bert 
Duffy Jimmy 
Dumltrescu Geo 
Dunan Harry 



IF YOU DON'T ADVERTISE IN VARIETY— 
DON'T ADVERTISE 



PIANO 



AT LIBERTY! 

LEADER 



SOLOIST 



RICHARD CONN 

(LATE OF 8EABURY AND SHAW) 

for standard big time vaudeville act or musical show 

2848 Broadway, New York Phone: Cathedral 6316 



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VARIETY 



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What A RIOT!! 

We're just lucky that's all, to start in business with a number- 

like this 

The besl 

This is our convincer, Be convinced. 

Gut- This Out and T - 






r^CO-PY 






Marcia 




By IRVING BERLIN 
A 




mmm 



John • ny Jones was a first class pri - vale 
He's not worth what. I have to pay-bin 



In the Ar 
But 111 nev 



my last year. 
er com- plain. 



Now he's back to bu's-ness in his^-flth. eYb 

I've a- greed to give him f if- ty dol-lars 



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Sun -day night I saw him with a smil-ing face When aeked whv he 

It's worth twice as much to . hear him call me "sir* 1 While I sit in 




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He winked his eye, « 
• Ou> in the hall «_ 



felt so hap-py John- ny chuck - led with gle 
cos-y of. f i ce lies out , side work-jog hard 

' ""^tij i iJTTJ U.J J j-iJitiaJ'H 



And made this re - 



Some.thing won-der-ful has happened to me. 



Chorus 



At my beck and caU With a feath-er dus-ter stand. ing on guard. 




I got. the guv^* f Who used to be 




my cap -tain work 



Wmf 

ng— . tor 



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He want- ed work, so I made him a clerk 



in My fath -crs fac - tor- 



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y. — , And bye .and bye^^**V r I'm gbn-na_ have him wrap -ped in work up 



to his brow 





I make him o-pen the of . fice ev.'ry morn-ing at eight 



I come a- round 



four hqurs late 



ev-'nMhine comes to th 



those who wait 



U'jrtji i f 




— Ivcgot my cap- tain work.- ing for me now. Y I've got the now. 

Copyright 1919 by Irving BerlJalM. 1587 Broadway, N.Y.C. 



OUR NAME IS 

IRVING BERLIN INC. 



Ill SIN'VSS IS 



OUR ADDRESS IS 



TOSIC PUBLISHERS 



1587 BROADWAY 

(Formtr N, V. A. Club Rooms) • 



RHIHHHHiM 






VARlfiTY 



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the coming season and submit the foiibwing J^URE FIRE HITS 



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Doubles . f op .Two Men or . Two Girls ; 
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music by 



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s\ „_,-ll '.'x -.>' V^^h^^'^slrd; 1 . 






22 West 46th Street, New York City 



OufrBig Ballad Hlil 



VH f a R R | g (.; n, p } \ f . m g , ; 



W\\J R RA¥ B LOOM , B?Pt|?C?l?Tl?K^!?M^^ 

" V^rvv-i' 1JLA DELRHl A.;. ; : R KIHrTiH EATR"F-Bi:tK.;.7; _ '"'"'-" 
Suite '705. —HARRY-LINK,' Prof. Mgr. 



SOMEBODY'S WAITING 
FOR SOMEONE 



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VARIETY 




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"LET'S TALK BUSINESS 

Soon the natqfaltaaw 

your mind what to sing next season, ^ 

OUR LEADER 






III? 




WAS MARY" 

This is a song trtat will put applausejin the hands of customers: It's the staple article. 



■■'■'■-■■ ■ 



; ■ ■ ■■ ..- , 



OURSALESMAN 



"TAKE ME TO THE LAND OF JAZZ" 

This is a business song^-any good business mamwill tell you-^you must have busine^ 

business ability. 



■ 



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""'■■■ ■ - v ■..' ■ . 






OUR COMIC 



"And He' 



I^HHHv ^* ■ 



You can get a load of laughs out of this one, arid it's bettcT than ''Come on, Papa.'' It's the goods. 

OUR NOVELTY 




ROOM 202" 



You must have novelties in your sample line. It's the b est novelty of -the season; 

OUR WALTZ SONG 



MIIIlMStt 



The waltz you'vejbeen hummingi ^rjTd^hsf^^ 



. 



■ . 



WATERSON, BERLIN & SNYDER COMPANY 

STRANt) THEATRE BLDG. .mr, frank ci ark, M K r 

« ■■:.. ■:■;.-. - ;.. - . 81 W, Randolph. St., Chlctro, 111. 

MR. MORT ':■ MORRIS, Mfrr. MAURICE ABRAHAMS, MR. FRANK WATERSON. M K r. MR. RICHARD REEVES, Mffr.' MR; JOE HII.I E>v M*r 

W-> i'™l*B***hrMte:.Mm\nte ' Globe Theatre Building 235 Ueb Arcade - • 40\ Camcrnphone Building 

Kan Francisco, CaL , .J' . ' Philadelphia, Pa. ■ : Minneapolis, Minn. . Plttfburfh, Pa. 



MR, MIRR AY WHITEMAN, Mgr. 
■IS1 Main Street 
HufTalo, N. Y. -V 



188 Randolph Street 
Detroit, Mich. 



711 Holland Bullding- 
St. Louis, Mo. 



MR/ DON RAMSAY, M*r 
240 Tremont Street 
Boston, .Mass. ■ 



-Tv-v. 



# ■■ ■ 



'■■: v 



■• •...'- :: --'.-.' : . ■ :. . •■ -. . •'■•'.': ■>:■■:■■:■■: -■■.. -. ■ . ■ .-.-.•."' f. ;•. . . , .-.•.•.•.. .-, '. ; 

VAWITY ' M ' ^Mm 



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L. WOLFE GILLBERT announces the "copyright of the Oriental "ChinosJapo" novelty of a decade 

"SHANTUNG" 

Will release it to the profession Monday—August 11th 

Remember the date. 

We want ample time to have your orchestration, piano copy, harmony, etc, ready for you. 



, ■ -.-"-V -'.- ■ 



>i3» 



—PUBLISHED BT— 



SSF GILBERT & FRIEDLAND, Inc. ^ etroit 

Philadelphia 232 We8t mh Strftet> New Yorkt 

L. WOLFE GILBERT. President PUBLISHEBS OF MAXWELL 8ILVEB, General Manas** 

"GRANNY", "MENDING A HEART," "I FOUND YOU," "GIMME THIS-GIMME THIS— GIMME THAT," "OLD JOE BLUES" 



San Francisco 



Eddy Bob 

Etnemann Peter 
Elaine A Tltiana 
Emmy Carlton 
Emmy's Pets Karl 
Esmond Mr H 
Essell T 



Fairbanks Mr A Mi 

Jack 
Farlow Mr A Mrs 
Fedgle Mrs 
Fern A Davis 
Ferrla Mario 
Fielda Billle 
Fitspatrlck J W 
Finn Albert 
Flint Edna 
Flagler Malla 
Forbes Marlon 
Ford Mr J 
Ford Vina 
Ford Edmund 
Foster Roland 
Frank Lillian 
Francis A Le Mar 
Francis Ml'toa 
Francis Carl 
Franklin Ruth 
Fred A Abbert 
Free Mrs M 
Friend Al 
Frohoff Louts 



Gardiner Nina 
Oardner May 
Gaut Louise 
Gibson Helen 
Glffln Eva 
Gird Harry 
Glassman Maurice 
Glenn Myrtle 
Gordon Nell 
Golden Jack 
Gordon Abble 
Gouleon Harry 
Gouget Felix 
Grace Katherlne 
Green Henry 
Gret Olbson 
Grey C 
. Grlndell Esther 
Groasen Myrtle 
Guertln Henry 
Guran Dave 
Guryan Mr H 



H 

Haas Oscar 
Hannon Wm 
Hurley Hetty 
Harris Joseph 
Harris Donny 
Harvey Zella 
Hawley Helen 
Hayward Jessie 
Henley Rose 
Henderson Norma 
Henry Fred 
Hllllard Fred 
Hoover Mary 
Hornldge ..Gertrude 
Howland Billy 
Hoyt Ruth 
Hunter Jimmy 
Hyues Agnes 

- . I. 

Irving Dolly 

.' J •' 
Jerome Emily 
Jones Paul , 
Jones Clarence 
Joyce Pandy 

K 

Keane Charles 
Keete John 
Kelly T W 
Kennedy Trlxle 
Kent Annie 
Kent Bt&pleton 
Knox Mr W Cromwell 
Knox Joan 
Kraemer A Cross 
Kuhn Blanche 
Kunkel Glenn 



La Grange Yvonne 
La Mort Imllda 
Lane Ted 

La Pierre Margaret 
Lawrence Lou 
Lenard Len 
Leonard Frank 
Leonard Ora 
Lelgb Lester 
La Rue Eva 
Le Roy Melvern 
Lawrence Mr £ Mrs 

C F 
Lewis Elsie 
Llttlejobns 
Lockett Lou 
Lovett George 
LuBelle Jacqueline 
Lynch Eva 



McKltterlok George 
McLaughlin Jennie 
McBally Pat * Joe 
Marston Rose 
Martell Lillian . 
Martin A Webb 
Mason Gertie 
Maurer L C 
May Irene 
Mohan Harry ' 
Meltoa Barry 
Merrlman Kuby 
Merrill Bessie 
Messier Marie 
Mildred A Hayward 
Mitchell Jean 
Miller Mrs John 
Mills Steve 
Mlnnlth Geo 
Monroe Cbauneey 
Montague Marcellne 
Monty Lou 
Moore Dorothy 
Moore Tom 
Moore Edythe 
MuUane Frank 
Mumford A Stanley 
Murrlel Roger 

N ■ 
Nevlns Mrs Paul 



Olln Rolla 
Omar Mildred 
Oquln Beauton 
Orplea 
Overbolts - Tommy 



Parker Monta 
Parks Emily 
Parvin Lee 
Pavares Virginia 
Peck Frank 
Perry Harry Hughey 
Pbllbrook Mr A Mrs J 
Pbllson Louise 
Plncus Lewis ». 
Pratt Neil 
Pyle Richard 

n 

Rafael Dave 
Ralno Mrs H W 
Ralston Mr A Mrs G 
Rambo Zella 
Ramsey Edna 
Rebera Jean 
Redding Mr A Mrs E 



Reed Mr George 
Regal Dorothy 
ResiBta Miss 
Reeves Eleanor 
Reynolds Francis 

8 . 

Slssle A Blake 
Smlletta Sisters 
South A Tobtn 
Stein Ben 
Stern Samuel 
Stewart Curly 
Stewart Deal 
Stokes A W 
Stone Betty 
Studenroth Kathryn 
Swan Robert y 

T 
Terry Kate Gibson 
Thompson Paul 
Thomas Trio 
Tinney Frank 
Todd Wilson 
Treboar Florence 
Trevett Evelyn 
Troutman Mable 
Tully Mary 

V 

ValladouB Lea 
Vincent Sherwood 

W 
Walker Lucille 
Walker Herbert 
Walsh Austin 
Walt C B 
Weber Carrie 
Welrlck Jack 
Westcott Ida 
Western Helen 
Wilbur A Girlie 
Williams Marie 

Z 
Zobedle Fred 
Zubn & Drels ■ ~ 
Zune A Drlke 
Zwlnkle Paul 

San Frswetaee) 

OSiee 

Ashley Miss A 
Bernard Mike 
Gibson Hardy 
Karloff Boris 
Klrkwood Billle 
Lamb Alec A Dot 
Lyle A Harris 
Norworth Ned 
Newman Will 



Chicago- OSlce 

Artolse Gladys 
Badle A 
Craig William 
EUlng Nell 
Faber Earl 
Genaro Marie 
Howard Martin 
Holt Harry K Mrs 
Harris Ethel 
Harris Ethel Mrs 
Jones Leslie 
Kelly Ed "Thanks" 
Kirk Ralph 
Knight Franke 
Kalama Princess 
Kenmore Bob 



Liberman Kllen iH '• 
Cooke W H 
Lambert Beatrice 
Lyle & Harris 
Lleberman A St let el 
Leonard Albert 
Monahan CAW 
Seater Jack 
Sims Rouble 
Sully Esther 
Schuster Milton 
Sharp A Gibson 
Tate Otto 
Thomas L Mrs 
Vance Ray ■ 
Wilson M V 
Zlra Lillian 
Zola Ed 



■< ATLANTIC CITY. 

By CHARLES SCHEUER. 

A. H. Woods Is to open the new Somerset 
Maugham comedy, "Too Many Husbands," next 
week at the Globe. Kenneth Douglas, Estelle 
Wlnwood and Ernest Lawford are featured In 
the cast, with H. Cooper Cliffe, Margaret St. 
John, Florence Edney, Barry Baxter. Marlon 
Buckler, Cyronne Darling and Beatrice Miller 
also noted. ■ 

"Take It From Me" la playing to big busi- 
ness at the Globe tbls week, opening to prac- 
tically a capacity bouse. A few minor changes 
are being made In the performance. 

Baby shows are the tad at the Steel Pier, a 
series of three being inaugurated July 24, to 
be followed weekly. 

Sunday night vaudeville concerts at the 
Apollo and Globe are drawing. The Apollo, 
which has played acts from the Philadelphia 
Nixon circuits for years has standing capacity 
audiences. At the Globe, open since Easter 
only, the Sunday night programs, mostly Keith 
acts, are now forcing the SRO sign to be a 
regular event. 

BOSTON. 

By LEN LIBBBT. 
ORPHEUM, LOEW.— Pictures and vaude- 
ville, with the new Charlie Chaplin release, 
"Sunnyslde," being shown for the entire 

BOSTON.— Pictures and vaudeville, with 
house also using the Chaplin feature for a 
headliner In the pictures. 

BIJOU. — Pictures and songs. 

BOWDOIN. — Pictures and "pop" vaudeville. 

8C0LLAT OLYMPIA.— Pictures and vaude- 



ville with "Sunnyslde," also the feature film. 

GORDON'S OLYMPIA.— Pictures and vau- 
deville, with the Chaplin film again the fea- 
ture. 

GORDON'S CENTRAL 8QU ARE.— Mile. EL 
Us Is topping the vaudeville for the entire 
week. In the split-week end of the bill li 
included Hall en and Fuller, Arthur White- 
law, Fern and King, Tyler and Crollus, and 
"The Fear Woman," Is the feature film. — •" 

ST. JAMES.— Vaudeville oonslsts of tat 
Milton Midgets, Jack O'Brien, the oomedlaa, 
Moddy and Chester, and Fisher and Foster. 
"The Girl of My Choice." Is the film feature. 

PARK.— Pictures and songs. 

GLOBE, STRAND. FRANKLIN PARK. 
EXETER STREET, FENWAY, COLUMBIA. 
CO DM AN SQUARE, MODERN, BEACON? 
Pictures, 

SHUBERT.— "Open Tour Byes," the educa- 
tional 01m now on the eighth week at tab 
house and seems to be drawing big just tie 
same. 

MAJESTIC— The screen version of "Dam- 
aged Goods." shown here and the opening 
Monday night was really an unusual one for 
a film. Due to stay at the house several weeks 
ami should draw big. Show when it came hen 
was somewhat of a sensation because of op- 
position to It ~~ 

plymouth.— Revival of another one of the 
musical shows which have been hits of the 
past. "Havana," being the offering for tie 
current week. 

WILBUR.— Second week of "Oh, My Dear," 
the musical show picked tor the opener of 
this house this season. Business suffered 
somewhat at the start of the second Week be- 
cause of weather conditions. 

TREMONT TEMPLE.— "Daddy Long Legs." 
moved into this house to finish out It's Bos- 
ton run. Tremont Theatre, where it had beta 
playing to capacity for several weeks, to os«> 
with a musical show. 

NORUMBEGA PARK.— Liberty Players aq 
using "Tess of the Storm Country" In stock. 

The Copley Theatre, home of the Henry 
Jewett Players, has closed for the balance <f 
the summer. The attractions there during til 
season have been decidedly changeable in na- 
ture, the shows ranging from several at 
George Bernard Shaw to shows of a light sal 
frothy character by new authors. 

The Tremont will open the regular seises 

Saturday when a musical show. "See-Saw," 
which Henry W. Savage presents and whlej 
Earl Deri Biggers wrote, will open then 
This week the house Is dark In preparation ef 
the coming production. -i 



Is Now In New York Looking for Acts 

Booking Exclusively for the U. B. O. and W. V. M. A. 

Address Me Care VARIETY, N. Y. Write, Wire or Call 



v.-. 



_>.. 



/ 









• ■ -,. •. -.v , •.: • ■ ,>-_.:■ <•:,. ■':■--:■;-■ ■ " •• ■ :"..'.. >.-.?. ■•. 

:•■: VAltWTY 



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STERN BIDS YOU WELCOME ! 



GLAD TO 
KNOW YOU 

" ' ' / ■ '~ - ■•- 



- ■■■"■ ■ " '■'■ £r ' ■ ... J 



••-, : •'- .5 :.* ft 

: . ■-■- v 

• ■ - :.: ■■'•" 



"Yon Didn't Want Me When Yon Had Me" 

(So Why D» Ton Want Ms Now?) 

"LETS HELP THE IRISH NOW* 
"BLUES" 

(Mr Nanrbty BwettU Give* to lie) 

"KENTUCKY DREAMS" 




GLAD TO 
SHOW YOU 







Our Song Hits 



"SIPPING CIDER THRU* A STRAW" 
f.. "KINKY KOO" 

"Why Do They Call 'Em Wild Womenr 
"I Found the Sweetest Rose That Grows" 

(In Dixie) 



119 N.CIark- Sh. 

:■ _ Chicago-; 



Jos W. Stern & Co 



181 Tremonr St. 
Boston , 



4 NEW -':pfi^::;PROFESSION;A:L^ STVJ0I05;^QW LOCA^ED,AT & 



BUTTE, MONT. 



Br DAVE TREPP, 

Blanche Savole, who has been in France 
entertaining the eoldiera and doing, other the- 
atrical work, is expected home In Butte next 
i Sept., according to word received by her 
brother. Loula H. Savole. She baa been Cooked 
for Kelth'a with a trio and also la Interested 
in a girl's minstrel show that will make the 
Canadian Waat starting out late this fall. . 

Rights for "The Escape" for Montana and 
other Northwestern states have been pur- 
chased br Louis H. Bavote. 

Legitimate attractions are bow few and far 
between in Butte. The Broadway continues to 
do good tmalnees with Pantages vaudeville 
four nights a week. The Empress, where stock 
held forth, la still closed, while the People's 
Hip had bean opened aa a straight picture 



Exhibitors who saw an advance showing of 
Dorothy Philips and Prlscllla Dean in "Paid 
In Advenes." at the RlsItO the past week, 
were enthused br the feature. 

Merle Davis la fearful of the future of 
legitimate attractions In Butte, due to poor 
patronage at the past few stands here. He 
insists that the public must show a heartier 
response or Butte will not he on the big the- 
atrical map. 

DENVER. 

By E. C. DAT. 

TABOR OBAND.— "Miss Nobody from Star- 
land," musical comedy by Supreme 8tock Co, 

AMERICA.— Alice Brady la "His Bridal 
Night" 

RIVOLI.— Pauline Frederick in "The Peace 
of Roaring River." 



ISIS.— Earle Williams la "The Hornet's 
Nest," first half, and Bessie Love in "Cupid 
Forecloses," last half. 

RIALTO.— Dorothy Qlsh in "Nugget Nell." 

STRAND.— Mary Miles Mlnter In "Yvonne of 
Paris," first half, and Viola Dana in "The 
Microbe," second half. 

PRINCESS.— Bryant Washburn In "A Verr 
Good Toung Man," first half, and Vivian Mar- 
tin in "Louisiana," second halt 

The Supreme Musical Stock made its bow 
at the Tabor Grand In "Miss Nobody from 
Starland." Judging by the crowds at the 
opening performances musical stock Is to he 
welcomed here. This la the first time it hae 
been attempted except as a strictly summer 
diversion at the amusement parks, and the 
outcome Is of Interest to theatrical men. 
Emmet Vogan and Leonora Ferrari are tak- 
ing the leads and are supported by a capable 
company. It Is planned to give the musical 
stock company a permanent home for the. 
winter at the Tabor if business warrants, and 
Indications are that it will. 

The biggest and most successful event of 
its kind ever staged in Denver-was the plenlo 
of picture folks at Eldorado Springs. Bverr 
exchange In the city closed at noon and the 
entire working forces almost to a man went 
on the outing as guests of the exchange man- 
agers. As many of the exhibitors and theatre 
attaches as could get away also joined the 
party, and with wives and sweethearts added 
the delegation numbered dose to 600. 

A special train was chartered, and from 
early afternoon until late at night one con- 
tinuous string of stunts was pulled off. 

Some of the prize winners In the various 
events were: Exchange Managers' Race— 
Charles Gllmore, of the United Theatres. Swim- 
ming Contest— Lon Battels, of the Hodklnson 
Exchange. Exhibitors' Race— C. E. Llpton, 
Mascot Theatre. Free-for-AU Race— F. E. 
Radcllff, of the Universal Supply Dept Ladles' 
Swimming Contest — Qeraldtne Skelly. Base- 
ball Game— Won by team managed br H. A. 



Kyler, of Supreme Photoplays. Fox-trot — 
George Bailer, of Supreme, and Mrs. Oeorgo 
H. Wygant, of Fox. Prise WalU— Walter 
Weltthoff and Eatelle Klausner, both of 
Famous Players-Laaky Exchange. 

Ben Cohen, the picture man, is back with 
his first love. Ho has assumed the manage- 
ment of the Denver exchange of the Select. 
succeeding O. J. Woody. Cohen was one of 
the original executives of the Belsnlek organi- 
zation. He established most of the company's 
exchanges throughout the country and was 
Mr. Selznlck's right-hand man for rears. 
When the company reorganised under the name 
of Select, Cohen opened the Four Square Ex- 
change in Denver and later became manager 
of the Film Clearing House here. His return 
to the Selcnlck fold was one of the most 
agreeable surprises given exhibitors and ex- 
change men In this territory In recent months. 

H. W. Braly, formerly associated with the 
Vltagraph Interests in lias Angeles, has come 
to Denver and accepted a position as road- 
man for the Film Clearing House. 

What is advertised as the highest-toned, moat 
artistically elaborated Cabaret Classic ever 
presented west of New York waa Introduced br 
the Dutch Hill this week. It Is Bob- Roblson's 
11,000 production, "The Ace of Revues," fea- 
turing "The Male Lucille." Other acts on 
the cabaret bill are the Bromley Sisters, Evelyn 
Francoeur, Snyder Bisters, Art Penny, Msxine 
Beaumont, Boyd Davie, Art Bonger, Estelle 
Boyer, Roy Landstrum and a beauty chorus. 

B. A. Olldstrom, as director, passed through 
Denver this week with a company of picture 
camera men and playora en route to the Rocky 
Mountain national parks, where films are to 
be made for the "Our America" series to be 
put out by the Famous Playere-Lasky organiza- 
tion. 



certain tract known as the "Atlast Ranoh." 
Said activity Is explained br the caretakers 
as the preliminary arrangements for the home- 
coming of the owner— none other than Jessie 
E. Prlngle, who as "Ma Jones" In "Llghtnln*," 
has been the bit of Broadway this season. 
Jessie Prlngle closes her New York engage- 
ment this week, and then the fastest trains 
will bring her to the Arvada Ranch— and 
rumor has It that once there she will not be 
* lured away. 

Difficulties of the National Film Co. were 
given an airing In the District Court at 
Littleton' when receivership proceedings came 
up for a hearing. After lengthy arguments 
br both sides, Judge 8. W. Johnson rendered 
a verdict giving the company eight days in 
which to prove Its ability to pay off an In- 
debtedness of (8,000 and to replace with a cash 
bond $4,500 of depleted assets. Otherwise 
he ruled that the company would be placed 
In the hands of a receiver. 

Will Foster, of Foster Brothers, owners of 
the Colonial, Pueblo, passed through Denver 
this week en route home after an sight weeks' 
auto tour In the Bast 

In addition to being a good film exchange 
manager Ward Scott of Paths, proved himself 
a clever Sherlock when he apprehended a 
youthful Raffles In the act of rifling his auto- 
mobile of tools and other accessories at the 
Screen Club Picnic. 



Out near Arvada, a small town north of 
Denver, unusual activity Is evident on a 



Percy Edwards, formerly manager of the 
Maverick, Thermopolls, Wye, Is In Dsnvsr 
making bookings for a new theatre which he 
has opened at the Washakie Plunge, at Ther- 
mopolls. He plans to operate the theatre only 
during the summer tourist season. 

Jos. Goodsteln, manager of the Arrow Photo- 
plays Exchange, has returned to Denver from 
New York, where he purchased state rlgbts 
for several forthcoming feature releases. 



B. F. KEITH'S BUSHWICK, BROOKLYN, THIS WEEK (July 28) 

REKOMA 



"TUT? 



Baltimore, Maryland 

Aug. 11 
Sa— gcgsi ui i es 



THE GENTLEMAN EQUILIBRIST" 

Direction 

ALF. T. WILTON 



KEITH'S, BOSTON 

Aug. 25 



■i-\- 



$£#* 




3* 



VARIETY 



5 , -■ 

.••■•■■ ■■■ 



As Old Jim Bro- 
ken Bottle Says, 



"HOW COME?" 



We're Still on Deck so Come Early and Avoid the Jam 

THE UNPARDONABLE SIN 

By F. V. BOWERS and A, J. LAMB 
You will commit on Unpardonable Sin if you dont use this number. ' 



SAHARA 



By H. 8. KAY and WM. K. WELL8 
If we can elect you to use this ditty, your act will 
never do a flop. This line has never been used 
before: Dont shoot, Stupid. 









Ife-FS 



PAN-YAN 



By AL. BERNARD and J. B. ROBINSON 

.You cant keep a good song down. There's 

nothing about the Shantung Treaty in this bird. 



LONESOME BLUES- 

• By MULE BRADFORD 
We admit this is the best blue song published. 



LOVE ME ALL THE TIME- 



By HAL. DYSON and WM. K. WELLS 
Now being loved by everyone who hears it. 



mM& ' 



|fer--v 

i 



Drop In and let as annoy yon far a few hews. We guaraatee 
oar office to be Jmt as hot as the next ene. We have a fan. 
bat someone pat ell on It. so new the dinted thins- went ran. 



FREDERICK W. BOWERS, Inc. 



ALFRED DALBY 

Beaie Arranger 



145 West 45th St, N. T. C. 



ATTENTION! 



Principals, acts, chorus girls (Ml to 961 weekly). For New Yerk productions, 
road shows and cabarets. See LILLIAN BRADLEY, Belt* US, Knickerbocker 
Theatre Bldg* 116 West Slth St.— Phone: Greeley 1693. 



! 

■ ■/.■■:■ : 



CALL 

CHAS. ROBINSON'S BIG PARISIAN FLIRTS 



Y.rti 



fti 



sad Oeotlseuo •nsaced for Uite attraction slssst report for resieml at New 
I Jfall. SOS W«t Wit St. 



...... .New Yerk City. Ntaiu, Assert «. 

KUoSly aaknowladi* te SSI Putnam Bulldlna, BreaSway and «ra Stmt. Nt 
^^ ' CAN USE SOME g60D CHORUS Q1RLS 



IMS A. M. 
t vera 



City. 



. 



— FOR SALE — 

400 OPERA CHAIRS 

IN GOOD CONDITION 

APPLY JACK ALLEN, 1495 BROADWAY 



-t. 



John Orleves' toleated players presenting an up-to-det© Nautical Travestyt 

"THE ALL1ES , SAFETY PIN" 

The excellent eaiu Stalls Alletta, soprano: Blmle Soldan. contralto; OUda Del Tore, urai; John Mri D o ni W , 
basso; Bdw.nl Thomas, tenor: Frank Dlliman, tenor; itobt. J. NsUago. bultaas; Don Mclean, basso, and 



aa unexcelled chorea, Including SenorlU Dal Tore's ]a« band. 



A VAUDEVILLE TOP NOTCHER. 



Direction, PAT CASEY AGENCY. 



A. F. Megahen, manager of the Rivoll and 
lets Theatres, two ot Denver'e largest picture 
houses, has returned from a trip to New York.. 

detroitTmich. 

By JACOB 8MITH. 
Detroit O. H. will play pictures until last 
ot August and thon open season again with 
Shubert attractions. 



At picture houses: Alios Brady, "Red 
Head," at Adams; Oeraldlne Farrar, "The 
Stronger Vow," at Washington: Mabel Nor- 
mand, "When Dlctors Disagree,' 1 at Majestic; 
Madge Kennedy. "Through the Wrong Door," 
at the Broadway-Strand: Tom Moore, "One of 
the Finest," at the Madison. 



Labor Day will see a ohange of policy at 
the Colonial from straight pictures to Loew 
vaudeville and pictures. 

Garrlok opens Sunday, Aug. 3, with "Take 
It From Me." Richard H. Lawrence, man- 
ager, anticipates best season In history of 
theatre. , 

Boss K. Hubbard wilt again aunage Detroit 



Goldwyn bas four first runs In Detroit this 
week at leading photoplay nouses. 

Blwyn Simons, of the New Family, Adrian, 
entertained members of the Michigan Screen 
at Wampers Lake on Tuesday of last week. 
Most ot the members have combination houses 
playing one-nights of legitimate attractions. 
It was the consensus that no road attraction 
should have a smaller percentage than 26 
per cent for the house. 



sSOTSIM™ ?*•>** m«*,"m 



A SPECIAL 






■ . . 



SHUBERT 
NUMBER 



n i 



% i 



will be issued by 



■ :, 



'-JH 



I ! 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 29th, Next 



as 



VARIETY'S special Shubert Number 
will be devoted to the theatrical ven- 
tures and enterprises 



3 



i 



I'-S 



OF 



LEE 



■ ,. -m 

... "M 
: ■!,W 



?nm 



SHUBERT 



Their present leadership and for- 
midable command of the legitimate 
theatrical field will be presented in 
facts, figures and names. 

The August 29th issue of VARIETY 
will be wholly a Shubert number, 
aside from the regular news of the 
week. ' 

« 

The Shubert Number will have an 
advertising adjunct, and VARIETY'S 
advertising rates will remain un- 
changed for that issue. 



• 1 

aa 






■ : "J 






VARI8.TY 










5»J5- 



''. ■'' ' ',':' ' ' It ' • ' '' '-■ .'^'■"V^'' 






Jp > that lam singing Irving Berlin's 

SR^'-v- >.-,•;. . ■ ;■: ■;*■.-■.• .•■•■-■••".' ;.'-■>'■•■•' -V 

isft''>''< .•■!.<,.'•:'■' "i V.V-'w .• '•;-.:.:-/.".-\'-" , ' , v -;>.- >■; ■■ ■■'■ " 

•.'fv'.- ■ -. ;■' .'•.: ■-.....■:,:. 7. ■-■.■,, ;p- •/*■;.: 4;V* ' "V.- 1 ■•■■■■ V* ■ ■ . v Ci 






par ■ ■■••v:-.:/ i ; ! -;■-.•■..- : 



X - 






ingfor Me 







■ 



WMMW&$B :; ' numh 
■ft; ill III IH ' lney . 




becauseit's a good song, a great comedy ■ 4 .'---— ^.^ 
number and it's making good. 3 / 

never have claimed this song had been 
restricted for my use. It vras not; it is nqt - 

Look at my picture in this and you can tell 4 

I am speaking the truth. 







assassas 



gfe.7. ■ •■ '•'•■ •./■'■■'••■Vv ' . ■.'■.. ■:,--_;.,..';■; v : .;•? .,■>' ' '.'■ 

.'■■■-..■■■ Pre 

W -: ' w..:: of! 



Press, work never gets me sore, but some 
it sometimes gets me wild. I S 

■" 1 ■ .'■■:■'■: ■ ■•'...-.•".• ■ ■ >'• '..'./'..' (•'•'•"■ -i . 

-■■■•,■■' . V .'. ■ ,, -■ ■..■.•..':■ " ' '-■:'■■:"•." • :■. 

•■'. ■ :••:■■ •:.■:" ■ ,-:•■■ ■' ■ *•- '■'■.'.■ . . : > '•-■•.■.;.' ■ ,».-. ... . l 



■ .'. . '■' ' H ". ' •• . 



1/ '.,-.- - 



Fla Ziegfeld's "Folliesi" Amsterdam Theatre, New York, Indefinitely 



■'■ 



••■ ■ . ; v '• x3u 



.■':■•'. ..■.-■.&,. 






Clauds c»dr of Lanilng has leated tba 
Oladmar, and will play road attractions spe~ 
cib.1 ploiurey next season. Reopens Labor 
Day. , 

■ddlo Polaad has been appointed manager 
of the Howland Theatre, Pontlac, and nlll 
took after the vaudeville bookings. . 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

Br JOSEPH ORANT KBLLBT, JR. 

PANTAOB8.— Vaudeville. 

hippodrome-strand. — VavdevlUe and 
pteturea. 

HBILIO.— Week of July 97, Leo Oarrlllo la 
"Lombirdl. Ltd." This Is the flrst leclUmata 
show to reeelve a waek'a booklag la this city 
In over a year. 

auditorium.— Oontiaues to remain dark. 

alcazar.— at, Aleaaar mueleal eomedy 
company In "The Red Rosa." with Mafesl Wit- 
her and Osaar Flgman la the leads. 

lyric— Ben Dillon aad Ai Pranks' aMslsal 
comedy stock. . 
I OAKB— Armstrong Polly Co. 

LIDBRTY, COLUMBIA, MAJKBTIO, 8UN- 
BKT. PEOPLE'S, UTAR. CASINO, QLOBB, 
CIRCLE, GRAND, BURNglDl.— Motion pis- 
turee. 

Despite hot weather, popularity of the ball 

Rne and amusements parks, all theatrea are 
lag well attended. 

Oregon delegates at the Pietare Bxhlbltora 
of the Northwest convention, held at Seattle, 



report Portlanders and their neighbor exhib- 
itors from throughout the state who rsglstsred 
on the convention books Included : J. J, Parker, 
owner of the Majestic, Portland: 0. M. Hill, 
branch manager of the Famous Players-Laaky, 
Portland, and members of the convention star 
and ball committees : Dorothy Jaqulsh, of 
Ontario; Joe Bradt, manager Echo. Portland; 
Lew Culllne, of the Casino, The DsIIes ; W. H. 
Durham,' of the -Grand, Camas; B. S. Hudson, 
of the Olobe Theatre Co., Albany; Charles 
Hettum, of the Majestic, Kalama ; L. B. Part- 
ridge, of Tillamook, the Prlnecss; A. Bsttlnger, 
of the Empress, the The Dalles: J. P. Cotter, 
of the thestres of Baker; flot Baum, manager 
of Universal Films; V. M. Schulbaeh aid Seta 
Collins, Universal. Portlaid. 



Harry Wise, a member of the Hall Rowtdap 
Ce., which baa been putting on ehowa at thaa- 
tres In southern Oregon towns, and a young 
woman -who rldss for ths same company, 
were seriously hurt and aeveral others allghtly 
Injured recently when an automobile In which 
they were riding went over n grade near 
Bridge, east of Marshfleld. / 



It le generally understood that Eastern cap- 
ita! has been offered to finance n eoaet-wlde 
theatrical project. It is also known that Port* 
land's chief executive, Mayor George L. Baker, 
haa received an offer from a large Eastern 
theatrical man, to which la attached a $10,000 
yearly salary. Thla offer. It le understood, 
would tske Mayor Baker to foreign lands, which 
he would not like, preferring to remain in 
Portland. 



Frank J. McOattlgan, manager of the Or- 
phenm, is now vacationing at Tillamook Beach 
and is said to bo writing a couple of sketches. 
MeOcttlgan will return to Portland about Au- 
gust IB. 

Fred Watroue, of Forest Grove, has purchased 
soms property there, whore he will erect a 
brisk or tile building soon, to be used ae a 

theatre, 

A telegraph lo message from Washington 
statea that several proprietors of picture houses 
in Portland have written protests to Senator 
MaNary against the bill of Senator Jonea, of 
Waehlagton, to eloss ths picture kousee In 
that eity on Snnday. The Oregon ssnator haa 
replied that he expects to oppose the bill as 
hs regarda It aa uadae reatrletlea vpon the 
personal eoaduet of the peepto of the District 
of Columbia. _ 

The directors of the Portland Opera aecoala- 
tlen will present the Van Flotow opera, "Mar* 
the," aa their next attract ion. 

"Baby" Barnloa Smith, child star with the 
Clovsrio Films, made a ponoaal appearance 
at the Hippodrome on the last kafi of last 
week's MIL 

Wallace Reld made a personal appearance 
at the Columbia Sunday, and Frank Ksenan 

Wednesday. 

A telegraphic massage from 8acramcnto says 
that Oeorge Primrose is dead. Mr. Primrose 
owns property In this otty. 



THEATRE FOR LEASE 

Umt lease on oofarBlsked theatre la ibirkij poso- 
latad part of Brora to vtnj Uvlni monw to oomslats 
it, Statin? capacity, UOO. 

ESTATE OF J. J. MURPHY, Inc. 
SI Wtrl Slit gt., N.w Vert 



■/ 



CALL CALL 

BEN BERNARD 

Producer and Stage Director 

MANAGERS DESIRING DANCING 

AND NOVELTY NUMBERS 

With Pep ul a Paseh, aas Preeer stu* Olnstfta 

: Call, Writs or Wire 

PONTIAC HOTEL 

62nd Street and Broadway, N. T. C. 

C.lrala MI-SMI 



&l 



M 




PHOTOS 

THEATRICAL 



or 



SIZE, 8x10— FOR 

SCREEN PLAYERS 



We employ no agents to annoy you. The quality of our work is our recommendation. 

DELACROIX Studio— 1465 Broadway, Cor. 42nd Street 




AT LIBERTY 

Aggressive American, 84, - 

Honorably Discharged from Service 

Coed Address, Hon ait end Sellable 

Foertean rears' gmiral theatrical experience oov- 
trim niHjIcai, vandevllla, optri. oarelval. eoneart. 
Industrial ihowi, ptotures. JBunttlvc sad ostlBlssr. 
Director, publlrttr. creator of advertlslnt idtsa. 
nasi ulasmanihlp, ' Am seeking in opportunity to 
>rore vslue, either producing firm or aetaoiu) rte>> 
raaentallve to titlit Would consider ptrtiiiraSlp. 
[inxiurlng and minmlnj. Kx-ioldlar Brefanvi 
unquMtlonsbls referenoaa Address SOX 77, 
VAitiETY, Niw Voir. 



I 



Big act. Something wonderful Pretty girls. 

beautiful dancers. Absolutely a novelty. 

Staged by Guy Kindell 

Electric display by Charles Desoria 

Costumes by Mme. Burns 



Jjgg 

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# ' A^^fe# AIL&fhn, 24QT/mont5t. 
'^ / •"* Publishers of 

GRANNY 

Thenaturaf National SongTribute > 
teourbe^d Grandmothe^J 

'A HEART* I 

A Poetic and Melodic Inspiration 
A Song Ballad destined to be 
,:,,JI % % Popular Forever ^ 

"Topical HitMTHE" Ballac 

BRING !|| "I i 

WONDERFUl;f YOU \ 
DAVS^^V/altzGem 

Needs No Comment : ? 

SINGAPORE" 



K* 



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K 



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ftrfc; 



^:-- 



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<iv/>°S 



OLD 
; JOE' 



NoveliyHit 

LATIN 

CONCERT 



LOVE' 

Hit: 



;•• 









:«. 



Silent Acts' Delight 

DREAMY 



WPPrn AMAZON^ 



"^4 



•J3Tv»j 



A HIGH 
WALTZ 



iHONEYl 






^f^f|5^^^%^^^^^^^^^Hipi^^^^^^^fl|P^p! 



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VARIBTY 



me WALTZ 



SUPREME 






j-',>.j j.\.\ 



A Song That Overwhelms 

OND'RJNG 



Ly ri c and M u si c 

. By 

LEt david: 



SUPREME 



^rLEE DAVID 



TO " VARIETY" READERS 



In tyro months we have accomplished this : 

Opened beautiful offices; released three numbers that 
challenge the field; have enlisted vaudeville head- 
liners; have secured our position with a policy that 
makes us recognized as reliable ,and reputable. 

MB RATH BROTHERS using our song waltz "Romance." 
Ta It is lifting itself above the mass. Its 'melody and 
lyric is compelling. 



NITA-JO, JULIA KELETY attest the worth of our 
number' " Wond'ring." It has attracted the discern- 
ing and critical. Its high-class calibre is strengthened 

by its popular appeal] ' 

■'.••'.;/■ ■-;■'.-;• ■.;■;•■■■■ ■-;. *\ • ■• ■ ■i.-,^- : 

And TENTS OF ARABS/' This is admittedly the 
best song one-step intermezzo written this year. Fea- 
ture headline acts are using the same with telling 
success. : /'.'• .'•'•' S ' 

[ TOTO, KH ARUM, GEORGE HALPERIN, 2ELAYA 
all announce and feature "Tents of Arabs" and 
"Romance." . 

• ■ " '. / . \ f '•-'■.. ':': •. i 

Lee David. He is under contract to us. He ju»t com- 
pleted LOU LOCKETTS new act Engaged to write 
Nit a- Jo's September offering. Commiiiioned to write 
EMMA HAIG'S next dance production; completed 
the Aborn's new musical comedy, etc. You are certain 
of songs of distinction. 

> . > 

We will be glad to have you call and hear these num- 
bers for interpolation in your new fall presentation. 



B. D. NICE M CO., Inc. 

Music Publish ers 
I54.4 fiFoadway :: N'ew: York Gity 



A ONE- STEP 

INTERMEZZO 

of FIRE and 

>fELOI>Y 



• 45ih and 46lh Streets 



Lyric a ndM u sic 
. By 



A ONE-STEP 

INTERMEZZO 

of FIRE and 

MELODY 



A HMhHB 

- r e tnt 






•ii£'» !*.■*■. &4*' s ; -.- . i 



VARIETY 






Ml! 

1 • 
1 it 



1 

fife 



P. DODD ACKRRMAN 
President 



MILTON ABOBN 
Secretary 



SARGENT ABOHN 
Treasurer 



ASA. PRODUCING CO. me 



1441 BROADWAY 



PHONE BRYANT 8989 



HERE IS ANOTHER SOLlfr HIT! 

1 "ON THE RAGGE0 EDGE* 

Br FRANCES NORDSTROM St .ted by WILLIAM PINKHAM 

An act written in rhyme and acted in rag time. A twentieth century jazz novelty with a punch. 



V-' ■--■;;■ ■ 



OPENING AUG. II 

magic Classes 



By FRANCIS NORDSTROM 

fjm) by WILLI, 

Ray Rffyt*. Ml 

Jat* Non.«1a) an J Commit* 



Stajeg by WILLIAM PINKHAM 
With flVy Hotm, Mary Mmon (Ml*. 



IN THREE SCENES 



"BUBBLES" 

. . , • With CARLOS SKQAHTIAN, ' Myr« oiga and Arthur Anderson 
One of the Moil LavUh Danes FanU.it. Ever Frwtnttd -In Four Glittering Scene* 
. . • IT HAS BECOME TEE TALK OF TBS TOWN . 

WEEK AUQ. II-BRICHTON BEACH THEATRE 



OPENING AUG. IS ' 

The Laat Word in Ma ■leal Cemedy 

ONE CENT SALE 

By ROBERT HARRIS. M. G. MICHAELS 
•ad LEEDAVIO 

With IS PMOla 
Beautifully Staged and Contained 



AUTHORS AND ARTISTS ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT ACTS WORTHY OF THE BEST IN VAUDEVILLE 
ALL PRODUCTIONS DESIGNED AND PAINTED BY P. DODD ACKERMAN STUDIOS 



■ 
I 



PROVIDENCE. 

By KARL K. KLARK. 
EL F. ALBBE.— "A Temperance Town," first 
presented here 18 year, ago by an Alboe Stock 
at the old Keith Theatre Is revived this week. 

FAY'8.— The Innls Family presenting "A 
Day at s dypoy Camp" heads the bill while 
others are Rober and Armstrong, the Palais 
Royal Trio, Lucky and Harris, the Tanada 
Duo, Adele Wlnthrop and films. 

TheNj. 8. Canada, of the Fabre Line, the 
largest steamship to over dock at this port, 
armed here last Saturday night from Mar- 
seilles -with more than 000 passengers aboard 
among whom were James F. Kelly and Emms 



I'KI-.IMHI |( 



Pollock, of the Keith Circuit, who have been 
In France and Germany for more than a year 
with the "Over There Theatre League." 

Antonio Dimauro, superintendent of the 
Strand ever since It waa opened, observed the 
16th anniversary of his marriage Saturday 
night 

Helen Relmer returned to the B. F. Albse 
Stock this week after an absence of two weeks. 

William J. Maboney, for many years a 
ticket seller at the old B. F. Theatre here, ' 
has been named as manager of the new Rlalto, 
which will open Labor Day under the owner- 
ship of Emery Brothers, proprietors of 



ANNOI 



the Emery and the Shubert-Majettic. He 
comes this time from the Park, Boston, of 
which he has been manager. . 

The Mating capacity of the Royal, films, at 
Olneyvllle, » suburb of Providence, will bo 
increased by COO when contemplated changes 
and additions are made in the near future. 

After being dosed alnoe July 1 the saloons 
of Providence reopened last week under new 
licenses granted by the Police Commission for 
the sale of 4 per cent beer under a special 
act passed by the Legislature last winter. As 
far as is known this state 1b the only one in 



which beer with euch a high percentage of 
alcohol la. being sold. The not passed by the 
Legislature holds that 4. per cent beer la not 
intoxicating. .Gingerale highballs were also 
being sold during the. week. Aa yet Federal 
authorities have taken no actio* against 
, saloonkeepers. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. ;i 

By L. B. 8KEFFINOTON. 

TEMPLE.— Vaughan Olaser Co. In "The 
Great Divide." Next. "Vary Good Eddie," 

FAMILY.— Fred Webster and Co. 

REGENT.— Clara Kimball Young In The 
Better Wife," first half; Elliot Doxter and 



Can place 'Jj moro 



acls fur liii; Tinn- Knsi iiiUI NY'iist; 



1() ALL SINKING ACTS- 

' V , .,!!■ i '.Mm .in ■ i j> jj' i rr u n 1 1 1 ','.' -mum, -njiii ,il, -nliili-h 



WILLIAM LfLYKENS 

#1520 KroadwMy, Room 7, Nrw ■■ VorkVPhoairf :Bldu* 



l.'All., W-IUi: nr \V 



l\ \'iii(t,( v .I| \v t ll> 1 1 



II' v',ki Inw runm in vui'il . n.i;l h'l'iiii 



mil" innli'— nniiU. 



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,v,c will in, ill iiilni's ul suil»s. 



KN|(:KKKB<)(:KKI< liARMONY STUDIOS, IMTMOAD^^NEW YOKK 



Wanted for "Oriental Miracles" 

(PRODUCTION) 

Small sister team, musical act that can lead orchestra, or leader that is more than • 
fiddler. Good novelty comedy act. 

WRITE FULL PARTICULARS 

WILBUR & LEVY, 209 Putnam Bldg., New York City 



Recently returned after three and a half years' tour of the world. 



Presents new and difficult feats in music The only 
one playing four instruments together legitimately. 




Direction. ROSE & CURTIS 



OVER WITH A BANG at Maryland, Baltimore, on sixth, just stopped one show after another. 

THE 20 CENTURY SINGLE 

LEON VARVARA 

"A PIANO PERSONALITY* 

/ . . . .. ■ . 

Proctor's 5th Avenue Now (July 31-Aug. 3) 

Keith's Philadelphia Next Week (Aug. 4) ' ^ Direction, LEW GOLDER 






■PSBK^^SHPPiSPIS^ 1 ^^ ' ' "'' : -'W^^ ' ' | ^ffpflli--' ■ ? "'iP^i^^^ : ■'.' -: ; ': , - : ^^S^!SS!S^i^ 



' ' aaiaVrili ( frH *"»^*<-' ' .•>">-...">.•• ■' i '-'- 



VARIETY 



■■:,■'■'■ ■ 



WSBF 5 .^' 



41 






i . M I LLER 

SH O EL S %«*• 




THBUiGtSTTHrATfUCUSNOt 

MANUPACTURERSINTNEWOSLD. 

WE FIT ENTIRE COMPANIES 

0FANVSI2E 
A1S0 INDMMUi ORDERS 

mnu. mm stage requirement 



NEW YORK .1554 Broadway u 46'-- St. 
CHICAGO ;, Statc a. Monroe Sts. 



Guerrini & Co. 

Tha Lead In* ud Lanjert 

Accordion 
Factory t 

la tie Unit* Kite 
Eaeoaly Vutsrr that makes 
•v Ml of Beeaa. made to 




277-17B CalimtulTi. 
San Franelse.. GeL 



Beautify; Your Face 

You tnutt iMk pood to mike good. Miny 
of the "Prtfrnlofl" hut attained and 

r*taln«3 better parts by having ot oof- 
rect their feature! iNStrtsotliai Md re. 

move blssMines. Coaiultatlos tree. f«m 
mmitk, 

'P. E. 8MITH > JH.D. 

$47 Fifth Avenue, N. Y. C. 
/ , (Opp. Waldorf) 




REDUCE YOUR BUST 

X.SS'Lf AT ' to * iE*" ■•» 0NB JAR rf o 031 

.OBESITY CuHAAL IiteraiO. AbaoioJaly earaleta. 
Uodaoea fa en any part of the bodyTNo dieting, 
•tjurlng. Meriting nor taking dangerous druga. !'»?• 

Bute moolah aguro. For ud and woman. Price, pnet- 
ntnirta, »m Amu o, BrseUya, N. Yw-f>imw: 

Ksors«r. 4*42. 



SCENERY 

OF ALL KINDS- FOB ALL OCCASIONS 

American Velvet Scenic Studio 

407 Gaiety Theatre Bid*. New York 

/ PhMt: Bryant MM 

E. A. PRICE, Manager 



r Lrt Us Prove QFW* '* * Bert "^ 

Bend for Price Lbt and Color Card 

III Wait 48th Straw New York City 



Rogtrs-isms 

The Cowboy Philosopher 
on the Peace Conference 



By WILL ROGERS 
can't tan war mm M. 
without tali book." vUC 
HARPER ft BROTHERS 
frtahllaked »«» _ NSW YORK 



PS*o> 



Theatrical Photographer 

j^gfll Ta tha may Art* PRICE 

*1|7 Irte of the Thaatrl. A^V aa 

xri offwMPhfftj^iii tpii.uu 



otfaraphotograplii 
-*\t* 8<l0-flnim»d 
la 4 Poses. Pries, 
PHOTOS 19.00. 



ALDENE STUDIO 

1628 BBOADWAY 
CORNER OF BOTH STREET 



EDIT , 

MOBIST 




THEATRICAL COSTUMES 

Evening Gowns— Street Costumes 

Lingerie and Hats 

SKETCHES FURNISHED „ 

86 W«st Randolph St. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Phona: Randolph 1710 



ARE YOU GOING TO EUROPE? 

Steamship Accommodations arranged on all Lines, at Main Offles Price*. Baal* are going 

very full i arraata .early. Foreign Uonoy bought and aald. Liberty Beads hewght and said. 

PAUL TAU8IO A SON. 10* Eaat 14th St., New York. Phone, Stoyvesant SHS-em. 



HAZEL RENE 



HATS GOWNS COSTUMES 



806-308 State-Lake Building Chicago. 

IRENE DUBUQUE) Formerly with 

HAZEL RANOUSf Edith Strickland 



Tel: Cent 18M 



GORRINGE'S 



Shipping and American 
News Agency, LicL, 



17, Green St, Leicester Sq., W. C. 2, London, 

Phenet Garrard 7417 Cable: Frankogo, London 

Artistes! Don't forget Frank.. Paaaperta, Passsges. 

Personal Attention riven to all who wlah ta travel. 
iH'i" 1 ■•lection of American Periodicals In London. 

TO CLIENTS.— I bog to t ' 
between Mr. W. B. Daw 
trualneae formerly known a_,_ 

The. booking of pa s sage s sroedsUy thoatrioei-baggag « forwarding, care of malL 
and foreign money exchange departmonta will be carried on aj efficiently aa ken 

KUlNK OOHIUNGH. 



cuon or American t'erioaicaia in liOnaon. 

i take this opportunity of adrlalaf ion that the partners*!* 

w and myaeir baring been dlaaolTei 1 am carrying on tka 
aa D.w-a Bteamihlp Agency at toe old address H abcra 




fore. 



Tours faithfully. 



FBANK 




H : HICKS & SON 

, 557 Fifth Avenue, at 46th Street 

HAVE A LITTLE FRUIT DELIVERED TO YOUR HOME 
OR TOUR FRIENDS— TAKE IT TO YOUR WEEK-END OUTING l 




1 ARRANGING 

The acta recognising the value of good oreheetratlena have thla atomp 
on ., V"T ■■••* lht >' own ' wh,ch aettlcs the matter with perfect 
aatltfaetlon. ' / '■ , 

Order fiow for coming teaton. Write or coll. 

L. L. VOSBURGH, Manager 

BOOM 80S GAIETY BUILDING NEW YORK CITY 




WIGS 



For Women 

DirectfromManufacturer 



Made to your own measurement of natural Human Hair— straight, 
wavy or crimpy, as desired. Can be combed and dressed the same as 
your own hair. Can also be worn for street wear. 
I always have on hand 400 to 600 wigs In standard colon and sites 
and can All rush orders Immediately. 

Also complete Moo of Swltohoa, Truwfonaatioaa. Carta, ato. CHI 



Free Catalog tent to out-of-town potront. 

ALEX. MARKS, 662 W. 8th Ave,, ot 42nd St, N. Y. 

Open Dally— 8 to P. M. (Ctgeti Sahmlsys) 



---i> 



Ethel Clayton In "Women's Waapons," 



aeoonrt 



M. P £?9 A JP Iu iTT- AJ,0 « B ™<7 ta^'HIs Bridal 

Night," first half; Bryant Waihburn, In "AH 
Wrong," second half. 

The strand, and the Family are doing wall 
with the showing ot the same program la aaeh 
house Sundaya. Both theatres are located 
downtown, within a block of each other, but 
exactly the same pictures are advertlaed and 
shown in the two houses every Sunday. 

The Gayety is fresh from the hands of 
decorators, painters and other kinds of arti- 
sans, and la all lit up for the coming: season 
which will start early this month. Manager 
Charles II. Yale waa quite proud of his house 
and Its patronage last season, but he la back 
in town prouder than ever now. He la assur- 
ing the publlo that every Columbia offering 



next season la to be an honeat-to-goodoesa 
guaranteed or money-back allow, breathing the 
spirit of uplifting laughter. 

The Lyceum will reopen Aug.' 1 for a three- 
day engagement ot Al O. Fields' Minitrels. 

The Aslmas Brothers and Seville and Plfo 
top the bill on the outdoor stage at Ontario 
Beach Park thla year. 



SALT LAKE CITY. 

Certificate was denied to the Canyon Comedy 
Co., of Ogden, Utah, by the State Securities 
Commission here last week to dispose of 8,000 
aharea of Ita stock at one dollar a share. 
Neither did the Commlsalon approve of the 
Issue of 10,000 shares of stock for the pur- 
chase of four manuscripts for film comedies 
from the pen of J. C. Robinson, a promoter 
of the company. The Commission showed that 
in ndoptlng a policy it has reserved the right 
to exorcise its Judgment In Individual esses 
when it permitted the Letshman Telegraph 
Pictures Borvice, with offices in New York 
City, to sell 4,000 shares of a par value of 
810 by agents or mall. 

Operating rooms,' in all of Bait Lake City's 
picture theatres were Inspected last Friday 
afternoon by J. L. Cattroa, Inspector for the 
State Industrial Commission, and State Health 
Commissioner T. B. Beatty. Mr. Cattron de- 
clares that 28 per cent of the motion picture 
operators are tubercular and that they work 
under such conditions that when they leave 



the operating rooms after a shift of 
they are unable to walk for mere than 20 
minutes. 

Louie Marcus, division manager of Famous 

Players-Lasky. has departed for Now York to 
attend a special meeting of division nuuMgera 
of the company. 

Bound' for Los Angeles, Gertrude Atherton, 
the novelist, waa a visitor hers last week. The 
novelist Is going to the Coast to put some of 
her best-known books Into movie form. While 
here she stated that her atorlea will be staged 
at the Culver City studios under the direction 
of Rex Beach and Ooldwya, Upon leaving the 
Coast aha will return to Utah to get the atmos- 
phere for a big motion picture feature. 

Playing at the Salt Lake Theatre laat week 
in "The Good Bad Woman," Margaret Illlng- 
ton placed an order with a foreetry company 
for ISO Utah poplar treea to be shipped to her 
country estate, Dream Lake, at Osslnlng-on- 
ths-Hudson, New York. 

Jack Dempsey and Jimmy Brltt appeared on 
the stage at the Pontages Friday night The 
pugilism were members of a box party and 
were requested by the management to appear 
before the footlights between acta. 

Ruth- Florence, a grand opera singer, Is 
appearing dally at the American daring the 
summer months In connection with the musical 
programs. Her work has called forth con- 
siderable favorable comment from the Amer- 
' lean's patrons. 



James Madison's Address 

until Aug. 28th will be Flatlron Building. 
844 Market St., San Frsnclscb. Communicate 
with him there for acts to be written during 
the Summer. 
MY NEW YORK OFFICE OPEN AS USUAL 




E.Galizi&Bro. 

Greatest Profeulonal 
Accordion Manufao- ' 
hirers and Repairers. 
Incomparable Special 
Works. New Idea 
Patented Shift Keys . 
21S Canal 8trcat 
N. Y. City 
Tel. Franklin 026 



WARDROBE PROP. 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

Bis Bargains. Have been aaed. Also a few 



Second H ajjj^I nnovntlon and Fibro Wardrobe 
iks. ■■swlld 115. A few extrn large Prop- 
erty Tranka. Also old Taylor and Bat Trunks. 



Trnnksa 



Parlor Floor, 28 West Slat St., New York City 



teaa 



EMPIRE 
SHOE SHOP 

707 EIGHTH AVE, AT 44th ST. 
NEW YORK CITY 

Short Vamp Specialists 

We Fit Entire Companies 

Hall orders given prompt attention 

Write for Pries List 

sasseaaaaaaaaaa»wawa»aBssaasBawaaB»Bw»BssBjBjBajsswas 



BREAK YOUR JUMP 
Write VICTORIA Theatre 

ROCHESTER, N.V, . 



,'J 



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. '.■■ jfet' 

' v.'V, i4£ 

| 



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;: plan 

, ':■'$$ 
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v COVERS FOR 
ORCHESTRATIONS 

AIM' IU)()KmM)!\C CO. 

. li') .\Vi'<l "4'Jhil Street;,*. Y, (,'. 



Plans for the PsntageB now theatre and. 
ftr the theatre that will be orcctod in the 
Ollft Building are In the hands of the Indus- 
trial Commission's inspector. The Commlealon 
has to do only with the proJootlnofTOoms of 
the theatres, to see that provision is made 
for the health and safety ot employes. 

Florence Kimball, who was a member of 
the Overseas Thsatre League and who Joined 
the Anne Morgan unit last December, Is help- 
ing to care, for refugee children at Bolssons, 
France, according to word received . by her 
mother, a resident of thla city. : 
• i i i* 

Florence Jeppersoh, of Provo, Utah, a noted 
contralto, has accepted a position' aa soloist in 
the Old South ( Congregational ) Chutch, of 
Boston. ' ;.;*' y 

The Pontages baseball team, made up of 
employes of the theatre, has withdrawn from 
the Commercial League because of a decision 
handed down by the league president in con- 
nection with a protested game. 

The Salt Lake Theatre le dark this week for 
the first time In several months. No date for a 
reopening has been announced. 

SEATTLE. 

MOORB.— "Open Your Byes," film. Opened 
Sunday for week, the flrst showing in the 
Northwest. Orpbeum vaudeville seasons opens 
Aug. 34. 

METROPOLITAN— "Lombardl, Ltd," next 
"The Good Bad Woman." 

WILKES.— Dark. Season reopens Aug. 31, 
with new leading man and woman. 

ORPHEUM.— Mid-summer Folly Company, 
featuring Lew White and Ert a. Hunt 

PALAOE-HIP.— -W. V. M. A„ vaudeville. 

PANTAOES.— Regular Pan road show head- 
ed by "Hello People, Hello." 

LYRIC— Ownes Burlesque Co. 

OAK.— Dark. Monte Carter reopens house 
Aug. 24. 




'.' . '. 'v.' 1 



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'.; 



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... ■ 




LIPSHUTZ 



EVERY TUESDAY IN NEW YORK 

Note NSW PERMANENT ADDRESS, 162 West 48th Street 
Hahr.ms— Pheaoi Bryant Ml PHILADELPHIA-lll Walnut Mrest 






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After giving you such ACTOR PROOF songs this season as 







J. H. REMICK CO. 

(The NA of JaAN and the TIN or KenbroVIN) 



r. 



It 



BACK THOSE WONDERFUL 



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GILBERT-FRIEDLAND 



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"I KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO BE LONESOME" 

». * » •• . •» . ■ » . x ■**#» niiiioni fin , - .*■■■*■ . . i. ---iA -v-i ,,.,■■ 



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LEO FEIST CO. 

and such applause getters in the past as : [ '■'.; ;; tfrC 

"When Old Bill Bailey Iflays ;ip^aa^*;^ Papa! Oh, Papa!" << Naugh1y, ^ughfe Nau*^ 
"Please Don't Lean on the Bell," "Railroad Rag," "Out of a City of Six Million People," "Dancing 



,'■..• i-M • i ' :■ 

■■,■■■' ": ■ :»■ • ■ 



the Jelly Roll," "Down South Everybody's Happy," etc ,,■ 

I think it time to notify you that I'm in a position to care for your MATERIAL 
i WANTS as never before and can give you my entire attention and have as my Asst. 



fl 



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:\\r. v{V'-, • '■ . '■ V: :■■ .-,■•■' :•.'•..■ .*•' ? '■; 
IS §£ '•■•. V '-W - S.-v/ i . 



A lyric writing genius from the West with new thoughts — ideas, 
etc, and as a final bit of chatter might add I am now 






• I K : ; 

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Fl 

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• ■■ . ■:. ■ ' 

.■'■'•:": •■ " 

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: PROFESSIONAL MANAGER 

for that Enterprising young Publisher 

JACK MILLS, Inc. 



152-154 WEST 45th STREET 

Phone Bryant 2289 ' .. ! 



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! CALL— Write— Wire— or Phone. I'm At Your Service. 

•: Sincerely ''•'•'' ,' '/.. ■"■,."„■'..'. 

NAT. VINCENT 

... ........ , . t 

j [ NOTE.— The following numbers of Miss Franklyn's, "Some Dark and Stormy Night" and "Caatlea 
, of. Make Believe" are fully protected, copyrighted and published by J. H. Remick Co. 



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A NECESSARY SONG, WITH A KICK— IS AN ACCESSORY TO YOUR ACT. 
YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT THE KICK. OUR SONGS HAVE IT. 



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Callahan & Kortlandar 

WEHAVEHlRCIASEPlHBliBmiL 

Composition 

FromlM S.ROBEHTSC«^.«rrf 

"SMILES" 



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ITS A POSITIVE 

SURE FIRE REHICK SONG HIT ! 

, Brssnaae {Prof0sshnatQo^es,V6cd(kvhc$tr^onA 
\SsmrFosYou 1 Pd/?ce Orchestrations Etc. 






CALL AT ONE OF OUR OFFICES FOR K DEMONSTBATION 

IF YOU CANT COME IN, WRITE FOR MATERIAL, 

J&E&y£KU$ WASHINGTON 

219W46«>51. 9lb«ndD.St. N.W. 

£44 Fifth Ave" Room 31 
PROVIDENCE CLEVELAND 

flusicDept Hall » Lyons Hippodrome Bldg. 



BROOKLYN PITTSBURG DETROIT 

fifiSFujicnSt Zii Fifth Ave. Room SI 137 Fort Street W. 

' CINCINNATI 

The Fair Music Dept. 



TORONTO MINNEAPOLIS 

127YontfeSt. Mil 



BOSTON 
226 Treraont St. 
PHILADELPHIA 
31 South S»!>St. 
BALTIMORE . 

lStewlDryCooAC 



ueicDept- 

Powera Mercantile Co 

PORTLAND ORE- 
SftaWashingtonft. 



-x s^ 



*?8!W WWSfR 



rand Leader. 

CHICAGO 

£3+ State Lake Bldg. 
SEATTLE 

322 Pike St. 



s • ■ ■ 
V,'.v s ./a • ■■■'.•'•■ 



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LOS ANGELES 

427 So. Broadway 
" KANSAS CITY 
1220 Brooklyn Ave. 



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is the most exacting 
customer a tailor can 
have. 

Thus, when 75 per cent 
of Mack's clientele is of 
the profession, it can be 
readily seen why the 
other 25 per cent look 
on Mack as a happy dis? 
covery. ..' 

Whether you prefer the 
John Drew or Doug. 
, Fairbanks type of dress, 
Mack can suit you — 
Ultra -conservative *or 
ultra - fashionable you 
will be equally pleased 
with the superlative 
fit and nominal price. 

. I 
■ - ' ( V ' 

Ready to Wear or 
Made to Measure 



MACKS 

1582-1584 Broadway 

Opp. Strand Theatre 



Trf. BRYANT 8181 



Dr. B. RUBER 

9 DENTIST 



CANDLER BLDfl. 

401 



220 WEST 4ZND STREET 



HEW 



Tlum SSI 
IW YORK 



PrtOFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHS 

100 Raproduetlons-glu, 8x10—4 8 u&letf*— 110.00 
Send Monty Order, or Ctll 

aldene Studio 

IMS Broadway. Cor. 50th St., N. Y. C. 




iflapbelle 

MODISTE 
ALREADY 
FOR THE 

NEW 
SEASON 



Exclusive Designs 
For Discriminate Artists 



145 North 

Clark St. 
Salt* SOS 

CHICAGO 
ILL 






m 



A NEW VARIETY COMEDY ACT« 



\ 




H. 




■ : __ Assisted by 

MISS MAUDIE SMITH 

Presenting 

*A $10,000 ANKLE" 

A Tremendous Laughing Hit—A Clever Comedian 
Pretty Girl— Funny Act— Original Material 

Creator of "The Baggage Man" 



1 



Representative, SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



REX.— "A House Divided," with Herbert 
Rawllnson and Sylvia Bremer. 
' COLONIAL. CLBMMBR. MISSION. LIT- 
TLE, STRAND.— Pictures. 

ARENA.— Roller skating. 

HIPPODROME.— Dancing, vaudeville and 
picture*. 



J. D. Rice, present owner ot the Dream, 
Chehalle, Wash., hat plana drawn for a new 
theatre in that city which will have a seat- 
ing capacity of 850, 60x120 feet in alse. The 
new house will play Fisher vaudeville and 
pictures. 

Ivan Miller, leading man with the Wllke's 
Players here for the past two seasons, went 
to New York this week following the close of 
the Wilkes for the summer, and will accept 
an engagement as star with a road show that 



is scheduled to leave Gotham early in the 
season. ~~ 

Difficulties arising over the sale of certain 
properties in the Camp Green amusement 
zone of Camp Lewis, has landed the principals 
in Tacoma courts. The amusement zone has 
about 30 active business establishments and is 
the only amusement park to which the people 
of Tacoma are in proximity. Several theatres 
are running on the main thoroughfare ot the 
zone. 

Tuesday was the warmest day in this city 
for 14 years, the thermometer registering 
87V6 degrees. Matinee crowds at the various 
theatres seemed to he aa great aa usual, tor 
all the large houses are ice-cooled through- 
out the time of performances. 

The United Artlsta' Corporation opened of- 



forltf s Largest Theatrical 



Deal 



er 



<!■ 



MY GUARA NTEE PROTECTS VOUR.PURCHASB FOR FIVE YEAR* 
' — i "Bal- «UU,» "Murphy-- 

"Hartmann" "IncNatrocto" "Taylor" 

LEATHER GOODS AND TRAVELERS' OUTFITS 



EVERY 
MAKE 



Guaranteed 
Five Years 

SPECIAL 



Regular 
960 Valne 

Mail Orders 
Filled 



FIBRE 

'THEATRICAL 

Ladies' or Men's 
Model 

(As Illustrated) 

' 12 Hangers 
5 Deep, Roomy 
Drawers 

Lock in 
Top Drawer' 
Shoe Pockets 
Laundry Bag 

Hat Box 



LI 



EDWARD GROPPER, 208 W. 42d St. 

*1<WS| BRYANT M75 NEW YORK 




L 



a 



P.DODDACKERMAN 
SCENIC STUDIOS 

INC 

. STAGE PRODUCTIONS 

Productions of Distinction 

(P. DODD AC HERMAN, Designer) 
STUDIO: 140 WEST 39th STREET 
. MEW YORK CITY 
. Phonet Greolty.aOtS 



Go Before Your Mirror! 

See .the Improvement. Lifting Makes 




■ 



■ 






Lift Up Oae Side 
•f your face 
Compare It with 
the other side. 

(Call. Write, or 'Phone Knickerbocker IS) 

Face Specially ' 

CensalUUea Free 

4ft WEST 44THBT. 

a attractive face. 



DR. PRATT 

Go through life with 



SWITCHBOARD 
WANTED 

with dimmers, anttable for productions. 
Addraw, trim full aa rtiealars; * . 

E. D. HEINS 

ROANOKE THEATRE - ROANOKE, VA. 



Sces^^lSBnfthTvenueTThTs^sjSekTThT 
suite of dfflces were formerly occupied by the 
Jensen A von Herberg exchange (Exhibitors' 
Film Corporation). 

Razing of the Rainier block, 2d and Marion, 
will force the Circuit Theatre out of business 
for the present Rente in the new building 
to occupy the site ot the present Rainier 
block (one of the oldest buildings in the city) 
will probably prove prohibitive to the manage- 
ment of the picture house and another loca- 
tion will be necessary. - •' 

^ *— _ ■»»---— 




f/Hn£npt 

lamwhai 
lappear" 



M ]VrO, sir, as soon as I can shed this royal 
-"-^ raiment and get busy with ALBOLENE 
to remove this make-up, I'll go with you to 
the hotel for something to eat." 




Every man and woman on the stage know* 
that nothing equals ALBOLENE to remove 
the paint and to keep the skhuin-good eon* 

dition. 

For the make-up box 1 and 2 ounce tabes. 
Also in i*) and I lb. cans. 

ALBO LENE is told by ' druggists and 
dealers in make-up. 
Free sample on nquett, 

mckesson & robbins 

bwoipontas] 

Manufacturing- Chemists 
Est 1833 

01 Fulton Street, New York 




I ^/ • •••■••* '" v - ■ : ' VARIETY •- " ' ; 45 ill 



y HEADLINED PANTAGES THEATRE, SAN FRANCISCO 

CLYDE HAGER and WALTER 



COMPOSERS OF 



it 



tf 



Just placed three new songs:— 



«iuBi piacea mree new huiikh; — • j 

"HONEY," "MY PRETTY CHINA DOLL" and "HUMMING BIRD" 

We have some wonderful new ideas in songs for the coming season and 
are open to all offers. Wire or address us care Pantages Theatre 

LOS ANGELES, THIS WEEK * 

HAGER AND GOODWIN ARE A SURE-FIRE STANDARD ACT 'In one" 






■.-..;'. '^-i .X".*i 



PARTNER WANTED 

Comedy acrobat would like to hear from 
rood acrobat, atrslght or comedy, or woald 
like to sot lata recornlsed act. Address J. A. 
PAVTSON. VABIBTT. New York. 

BEN STEIN 

PHONE HARRY— IMPORTANT 



MERCEDES 

727 IRVING PARK BLVD. 

Telephone: Wellington 10252 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



THE FAYNES 

Fuller Circuit, Australia 



LILLIAN DE VE RE 

Tho Girl with a Vole* 
DlrertUn, BABL * TATE8 

Blaborats preparations have boon made for 
the annual military horsesbow handling a ca- 
pacity crowd ont of Taeoma. 

Maurice Oppenhelmer, theatrical and min- 
ing magnate of Spokane, waa fined $850, and 
sentenced to four months In Jail In that city 
Thursday, charged with having liquor In his 
possession. He will appeal the case to the 
higher courts. 

Norman Hackett, former star with the. Wil- 
kes' Playera, here, and now with the "Tea 



for Three" road show as star, le spending a 
six week's vacation In this city. He will re- 
join the company In California. 

Ida Tarbell is In Chehalla this week on a 
Chautauqua tour of this section. Wednesday 
she waa given a luncheon by the Citizens' 
Club of that city. 

The Greater Alamo Shows will move to the 
southern part of the city for an additional 



week's showing here at the close of the per- 
formance Sunday at the grounds at 5th and 
Lenora. 

The Northwest Film Board of Trade, rep- 
resenting 780 theatres and exchanges In the 
Pacific Northwest, went on record Friday, 
during the Motion Picture convention, as 
favoring Mayor Ole Hanson, of this city, for 
the next president of the U. S. Peter David, 
Taeoma delegate, who served with the mayor 



'» » )■ J 



ART FURNITURE 




AT VERY LOW PRICE 

FOR a quarter of a century wa have 
been recognized primarily for the 
great beauty of our furniture de- 
signs—and for the very low prices we 
offer, because of our location out of the 
high rent zone. We cater especially to 
members of the profession. 

liberty Loan Bonds Accepted at Pull 
Face Volae . 



A 3-BOOM APABTMBNT 

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Write for New 89-Page Catalog 
and 8-Page Special Sals CireaUr 

- Term* spply also to New York . 
Stata, New Jersey and Connecticut 

BaMty reached from Wett Bide by 
80th or 69th Street Crotttovn Core 



HOLZWASSER & CO. 



1423 THIBD AVENUE 
NEAB BOTH 8TBEET 




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Bound ts please the mo* t critical with 
his Inimitable "robe" character sad high- 
ly enter tainlnr musical bit. 

CHARLES ALTHOFF li 

The Sheriff of HJcksville 

in the Washington state legislature, made the 
formal motion endorsing Mr. Hanson for prea. 
idem. The resolution carried by acclamation. 

The Frederick Palmer Photoplay Corp., of ■ i$5g 

Los Angeles, has opened offices here In the \-~~l 

Green building with Mrs. Mary I. Parsons, 
as local manager. • ' v : 



A TON 
OF PEP 



MILLS -d CO. 



A BIG SUCCESS ON THE LOEW CIRCUIT 



« Hi 



■ -vsi 



m 



iv 



BEN HASSAN 

THE CYCLONIC COMEDIAN AND TUMBLER— PRESENTS ' 

THE BEN HASSAN TROUPE 



The Fastest Tumbling Act in Vaudeville. 



In a BIG COMEDY WHIRLWIND SENSATION 



A SURE-FIRE HIT IN ANY SPOT ON ANY BELL 
Scoring: a Tremendous Success in the West Coming: East 



VABIETY 



"The BEN HASSAN TROUPE of Arab, were tho 
headlfasara and proved to be a tumbling- act way 
above the average. They anecsedsd In Injecting 
a let of comedy Into their perfermsnee aad closed 
to tremendous applause." 



Direction, HELEN MURPHY 



:■:■ 



.(■iliws. .111.11 imii -T t jiTi^riTV-'~^iWTFT?ir"'^^^ rj ^rT "Tir" rnr-r-rrn -, 






VARIETY 



S i ' 

mm. 



SING THIS SONG! 



WORDS BY 



GROSSMAN-MUSIC BY BILUB P BIS EL -SONG SUGGESTED BY FRANK MULLANB .</ 



IT'S 
TUNEFUL 



ALWAYS 
PLEASING 



FITS ANY 
SPOT IN ACT 



CATCHY 
MUSIC 



VERY 

TIMELY 



APPLAUSE 
CONTINUOUS 



GAINS 
FRIENDS 



LEADS 
ANY BILL 



MOST 

APPEALING 



COMMANDS 
ATTENTION 



ENCORQ 
CERTAIN 



ADDS TO 
POPULARITY 



RAISE YOUR VOICE! 

PROFESSIONAL COPY AND ORCHESTRATION (VOCAL OB INST.) FREE TO RECOGNIZED ARTISTS 



l!9 N'; Clark ; 5l: 
Chicago 



Jos V. Stern IS Co 



I3i '";Tr?ernont"-:' 



mm&^^mm^mM. 



FH 



'mfSmm 



./. /- 



BBBBBBBBl 




CRABLE «•» CO. 



"AFTER THE 1st OF JULY" 

A CLEAN, NEAT AND COMICAL ACT 



Seattle faM the finest picture theatres in toe 
entire West, according to Ed. Hudson, owner 
of a string of picture theatres In Eugene, 
Albany and Roseburg, Oregon, who waa a con- 
vention visitor this week. ^ 

Margaret Motle, official "Mlas Spokane," 
for tho pait sevon or eight y^ars. attended 



DAVE HARRIS 

A Brand New Single 

headed for the top of the 
Udder and going strong 

Writer of "Room 202" 

Loew's Victoria, New York, Now 
(July 31-Aug. 3) 

Direction: 

IRVING COOPER 



the convention aa a delegate from the Falls 
city, garbed In fall Indian costume. She 
made her professional debut a abort time 
ago with the Woodward Stock company In 
that p'ty. John Ram, Bremerton theatre 
magnate, entertained the convention delegatea 
Saturday neon at a luncheon served In the 
harbor at that place, and later In the after- 
noon, with a special program at hla Rlalto 
Theatre. 

Mr and Mrs. Hamilton Douglas, of the 
Douglaa Dancing School, this city, aupplted 
the headline act at the Pantages this week, 
with a terpslchorean turn, "The Rising Gen- 



eration," a bevy of local youngsters that more 
than made good the promises of the teachers 
prior to being booked by Manager Pantages. 

Syracuse; n. t. 

By CHESTER B. BAHN. 

EMPIRE.— 1 nth week Of Knickerbocker 
Players. "Fair and, Warmer" current 

TEMPLE.— Vaudeville. 
STRAND.— "As a Man Thinks," first halt 
ECKEL.— "Ryea of the Soul," first halt 
SAVOY.— "The Best Man," first half. 

Al Q. Field and hla minstrels will open the 




win shortly show 
his stents of West- 
ern thoroughbred 
Acts to Baatera 



XT-yon ere from the 
Weal aad aaa ojaat. 

If y la rest eoatnany 
— writ) or wire* 



■arte loss, Paleee Theatre Bide New Terfc 
wttk UNI HUSHES, Inc. JO PAIGE SMITH sad RAT 



fall legitimate sesson st the Empire, Aug, il- 
ia, following on the heels of the Knickerbocker 
Players, who dose Aug. 9. 

. Billy Daniels (William Danforth In private 
life) has been vacationing In hla home town, 
the guest of the Hon. John R. Clanoy. With 
him la his daughter, Virginia Danforth. 

draco Dwlght Potter, press representative of 
the Strand ,1s back on the Job after a three 
weeks' reat 

Prancla M. Kitayama, aged 25, Japanese 
butler employed by James K. Hackett at his 
summer home, Zenda, near Clayton, waa drowned 
off Mr. Hackett'a dock Friday afternoon while 
in swimming. Kitayama, the eon of a wealthy 
Toklo mckehant and who haa been a student 
at Columbia, aank In full view of the actor 




THEATRICAL OUTFITTER 



1578 Broadway 



New York City 



ROBE.RT LAW SCENIC STUDIOS 

NEW YORK 
RAYMOND HITCHCOCK'S Production "HITCHY KOO 1919" in preparation 



'.,;-. ;'.: 



(V* 



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W? 






S?==» 



VARIETY 



47 



'. I 1 -^- 



i.-i 



§;• 



- 



'•■; 



E. F. ALBEE, President 



J. J. MURDOCH, General Manager 



B.F. Keith's 



F. P. PROCTOR, Vice-President 






.. > 



[AGENCY] ",:"•■ 

(Palace Theatre Building, New York) 



a 



ifet*#- 






■ ,/ 



B. F. KEITH 



EDWARD P. ALBEE ^^.^^l|j|| ?|1 R ^ rapCTQE I Si 



.' .: •■'■' 



'?'.'■ 



Founders 
Artists can book direct by addressing S. K. HODGDON 



.. •;' 



I .'/''.,':(! 



iR:'< 



.■K-;v.y:-Vt : ^ 

l|-'.:'-.;':>i':i)^3 

■• i -. f .- , ".34' i » 



i 



"'■. : -..;'.^'."'... 



'"■.' ■' I,' :■'■■. 



■ ••• 



■■:■"... 



m\ 



Marcus Loew's 
Enterprises 

General Executive Offices ; 
Putnam Building, Times Square 

New York 
JOSEPH M. SCHENCK 

. General Manager 

J. H. LUBIN 

\ Booking Manager 
Mr. Lubin Personally Interviews Artiste Dally 

Between 11 and 1 

Ada laying off in Southern territory wire N. Y. Office 

CHICAGO OFFICE 

North American Building 

J. C. MATTHEWS in charge 



r- m- :':'■■■:.. 



i 



■ 




■ ■ : ':«: 



Broadway 

(Putnam Building) |;; 

New York City ililfliS 

■ ■■ :x ..,- . ■ • • ••• • ' -;•■ '>4i'*' ' 



FULLER'S Australian 

and N. Z. Vaudeville 

QsMmlef Director: BEN j. PULLER 
s BOOKINGS ARRANGED 
Pur all i»illngs from Ban Fraadsoo and Taaaxuar 

A«*nU: 
ffwlirn Vandavllle jjgtV Ann-, Chicago 



and a party of guests. The Jap ovldontlv was 
seized with cramps, but his failure to utter an 
outcry resulted In delaying the rescue attempts 
until too late. 

The body was recovered by means of grap- 
pling hooka some two hours after the man 
sank . The Jap had been at Zenda for ten 
weeks, but had been with Mr. Hackett on the 



road for seven months previously. The vic- 
tim's father was notified by cabla, and funeral 
arrangements delayed pending Instructions 
from Toklo. Kltavama was supposedly an 
expert swimmer. 

Gladys Caldwell, prima donna, Joined the 
Rorlck's Glen Opera Co. at Elimar this week, 
as did John Wheeler, who was engaged, to 
sing the role of "Pooh Bah" In the current 
production there of "The Mikado." Another, 
new face In the company this week was Isa- . 
belle Galbreath, In private Ufa Mrs. Leslie 
Kelly, of Blmlra. 

, Though he has fallen heir to a fortune of 
about (100,000, part of the estate of the lata 
George Shaw, of Bt Louis, Chariot Shaw de- 
cided while at Cortland last week not to quit 
his flO a week "and found" Job as a stake 
driver with the Selle-FIoto circus. A Bingham- 



* 



The Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association 

MORT 8INGEB, General Manager . TOM CABMODY, Booking Manager 

5th Floor State-Lake Theatre Bldg. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Harry Rickard's Tivoli Theatres, Australia 

HUGH D. McINTOSH, Governor Director 

Rajltttna Casta Address: "HUQHMAC," Sydaw Mead Off lost TIVOLI theatre. Sydney, Asttralla 

American HeprwenUUv* NORMAN JBFFERIES Rttl EUato Trilt DlUg.. Philadelphia 



ARTHUR J. HORWITZ -LEE KRAUSJnc. 



BOOKING 



CHICAGO 

mi? state T' EAST AND WEST 



NEW YORK 
Putnam Bldg. 
1493 Broadway 
Acts desiring Immediate and consecutive bookings communicate. 

Full details on baok cover of this issue of VARIETY, 



BERT LEVEY CIRCUIT 
VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

ALCAZAR THEATRE BUILDING BAN FRANCISCO 



Has Established a Special Department 

for the handling of novelty spotlight attraction* for motion picture theatres. The 
same department Is also handling special attractions for hotels and cafes, furnishing 
? cU , ,n 8 ?. me _, of thsjBX8« r hotels In Chicago, Including the Edgewater Breach Hotel! 
LoSalle, Morrison. Sherman, Congress Hotel, eta. ««»•• 

Reputable artists with open tune In the vicinity of Chicago write, wire or call 
p>. and see us. 

piji/1 a r*f\ XT A I ¥T\1?*7II ¥ I? A e^ , 17i\Ia^ , V , Managers visiting Chicago are Invited. to make our office their headquarters. 

CHICAGO VAUDEVILLE AUL1NCY FRANK Q. DOYLE'S Chicago Vaudeville Agency 

SUITE 1114 NORTH AMERICAN BLDG. PHONE CENTRAL 6200 



FRANK Q. DOYLE'S 



• '■'> '*'■ ■ r .-.?. i w.-lr 






■ • ! 

'.'■■•• "■■": 



.1 



'■ 



• "3 V, 




VARIETY 



m 



Booking over seventy -five first -class 
vaudeville theatres and sixty houses play- 
ing tabloids in New York, 
Ohio, W. Va., Penna., Ky., 
Ind. and contingent States. 

Acts Going East or West, 
Having a Week Open — 
Wire, Write, 'Phone- 
The Springfield Office. 



': 



■ • ■ 






• 




GUS SUN 

President 



PETE MACE 

Palace Theatre Bldg. 
NEW YORK CITY 

TOM POWELL 

State-Lake Theatre Bldg. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



Acts can 
Book Direct by 
Addressing Above 



HOMER H. NEER 

Executive Manager J # ^ 9 TODD 

WAYNE CHRISTY C. S. SARGENT 

Booking Manager 726 Brisbane Bldg. 

AW TH1MFQ BUFFALO, N. Y. 

A As'soci!5e HOWARD ROYER 

Sun Theatre Bldg. 205 Apollo Bldg. 

SPRINGFIELD, O. PITTSBURGH, PA. 



.: :S 



On 34th Street 
A. RATKOWSKY, Inc. 

The Old-Fashioned Furriers 

FURS 

Advance Models 

Coatees. Stoles, Scarfs, and Novelty Fur 
Pieces that are the very latest in fashion. 
All are offered at the price you would 
have to pay wholesale, we manufacture 
our own models and abolish the whole- 
sale and retail profit 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO 
THE PROFESSION 

Furs Stored, Repaired 
and Remodeled 



ton lawyer traced Shaw, who formerly was 
•mployed in that city, and found him with the 
circus at Cortland. Shaw is a foster son of 
the deceased St. Louis man, hut had mot 
anticipated sharing In the estate. 

William H. Foster, of utlca, N. 7., an em- 
ploye of the Joseph Ferarl Snows, was removed 
to ttao Watertovra city hospital on Friday, seri- 
ously ill. 

Through the courtesy of Owner Charles P. 
Gihuore, of the Richardson, Oswego, "Jean 
8t. Pierette," a musical comedy in pantomime, 
was presented at the Richardson on Wednes- 



NOTICE-VaudeviUe Acts 

CAN USE 6 GOOD ACTS 

WEEKS AUG. 10-17-24— CLEVELAND, 0.; ERIE, Pa. 

Address FRED. H. BRANDT, 614 Permanent Bldg., Cleveland, O. 



LO 



? 



>■ 



ALLAH brings light in darkness! 

A long-needed Broadway want. 

A Drug-Store with courteous service and 

Complete stock. 

WINTER GARDEN BUILDING 

M, PAUL (DOC) GORDON 
(formerly of Boyer's) 

Complete Line of Make-Up and Accessories 

MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION 



■YOU ARE NOW IN TOWN 

SAVB YOURSELF FUTURE 
PAIN AMD TROUBLE 

See Dr. A. M. WEISS 

OFFICIAL DENTIST TO N. V. A. 
1481 Broadway, at 43rd Street 
ET Special Summer Rate* "va 




NEW YORK COSTUME CO. 



COSTUMES 

117 N. WABASH AVE. 



LARGEST COSTUME 
MANUFACTURERS IN VEST 

CHICAGO 



GOWNS 

CENTRAL 1801 



day by men of Base Hospital No. 5 of Fort 
Ontario. Syracuse and Oawego girls assisted. 

May Irwin la getting in the bay on faer ISO- 
acre farm near Olayton these days. The iUn 
won't see nor much before Sept. 1, ah« says. 
Flo Irwin, May's Bister, to now at Um Irwin 

farm. 

Winifred Williams, contralto singer, and 
fred H. Livings ton, saxaphonist, arrived back 
in Blnghamton this week from "over there," 
and are taking a brief rent before starting 
on a tour of the Liberty theatres. Ida May, 
comedienne, who was with them, returned earns 
time ago, having lost her voice while at St . 
Mlhlel. They were then joined by Charmlon / 
Edwards, accompanist, and Billie Bowman, ' 
comedienne. 

After lying asleep for 52 days, during which 
time her unusual case attracted the attention 
of the medical world, Mrs. Barnett Kaufman, 
mother of the late Philip Kaufman, and of 
Irving Kaufman, also a professional, died at 
the Crouso-Irvlng Hospital here Isst wsek. 
Mrs. Kaufman was first stricken on May 80, 
and remained in a state of coma until the 
end. The case Is the first of its kind In 
known medical history. Bbcpert scientists 
studied the case, and the hospital authorities 
received dally inquiries from all over the 
country regarding Mrs. Kaufman's condition. 
Medical writers heretofore have agreed that 
no person could withstand a two weeks' sleep. 

Mrs. Kaufman's complaint closely resem- 
bled the sleeping sickness, excepting that her ■ 
coma was the result of a paralytic stroke. In 
1017, the deceased suffered a stroke which 
took away her speech. She was unable to 
utter a word until the body of her son, Philip, 
was brought here for interment. 

Permitted to view the body, she screamed 
and recovered her voice. On Memorlsl Day, 



SOMETHING NEW IN SCENERY 



DROPS AND FULL STAGE SETTINGS 



We offer for rent or tal» brand new settings and drops to the latest 
sod moat gorgeous designs In painted draperies, 

100 now iett end Ideas. Let us submit same for your spproial. 

BEAUMONT VELVET AND PAINTED SCENERY STUDIO <v. lewis, M g r.> 



Our new factory and artists are at your service 



245 West 46th Street, New York City. Phone Bryant 9448 



' G' v . 



m: •' •: ■ ' ■■'■:■■- ..; y 



SW^SPP^^ 



". . 



VARIETY 






i» 



snr ; 



BEST PLACES TO STOP AND DINE AT 



, ' ■."' Wj' 



" '•'.if'-'-* 

• •/'.-:•■. a! 



KsS&ffi 



MI 



LEONARD HICKS » HOTEL GRANT 



Madison and Dearborn Streets 



"The Keystone of Hotel Hospitality" 
Offers Special Weekly Rates to the Prof ession 



CHICAGO 



500 Housekeeping Apartments 

(of the better class, within reach of economical folks) 

Under the direct super vision of the owners. Located in the heart of the city. Jut 
off Broadway, close to all booking office*, principal theatres, department store*, traction 
lines, "L" road -and subway. ' , „ , 

We are the largest maintainors of housekeeping furnUhed apartments specialising 
i to theatrical folks. We are on the ground dally. This alone Insures prompt serrlce 

*" d 'alE' BUILDINGS EQUIPPED WITH STEAM HEAT AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS 



HILDONA COURT 

841 to 347 Wert 45th St. Phone: Bryant 8255 

A building us lux*. Jnrt completed; elevator 
apartmenti arranged In suit** of on*, two and three 
roomi, with tiled bath and ihower. tiled kltcheni, 
kitchenette*. Theee apartment* embody every luxury 
anown g^Sg^j Up WwWy 

YANDIS COURT 

241-247 Writ 43rd St. Phone: Bryant 7912 

One, thrie and tour room apartments, with kit- 
chenette*, private bath and telephone*. The privacy 
these apartments are, noted tor I* on* of It* at- 
traction*. $12.00 Up Weekly . 

Address all common 



HENRI COURT 

312, 314 and 316 West 48th St. Phone: Bryant MM 

An up-to-the-minute, new, fireproof building, ar- 

ranged In apartments of three and four rooms with 

kitchen* and private bath. 'Phone In each apart- 



ment. 



f 17.00 Up Weekly 



THE DUPLEX 

328 and 330 West 43rd St. Phone: Bryant 4293-6131 
Three and tour rooms with bath, fanriihed to * 
degree of modsrnneu that exosls anything In this 
type of building. These apartment* will accommo- 
date (our or more adults. 

$9.80 up Weekly . 
cations to M. Claman 



Principal Office— Yandis Court, 241 West 43rd Street, New York 
Apartments can bo seen evenings. Office In each building. 



TeT Hryant &G4-G35-7833 



On* B I •».■!< to Times Square 



The Edmonds Furnished Ai rtments 



MRS. GEORGE DANIEL. Proprietress _ . „,.„._,„. 

Catering Exoluslvely to th* Profssilon Special Summer Rat** . -■:» June to 8*otoBb*r 

776-78-80 EIGHTH AVENUE 
Between 47th and 48th Streets 
Private Bath and 'Phon* NEW YORK P ™„*,™ ,,,„„_, 

In Each Apartment - U " "-— 778 MGHTH AVENUE 



Phone: Bryant 1944 



Geo. P. Schneider, Prop. 



•Tp-tTTi* Q17D # T % HT A FURNISHED 

1 JlXJL JDJCsflV. 1 JLX/tl apartments 

Complete for Housekeeping — Clean and Airy 

323 West 43rd Street, NEW YORK CITY 

Private Bath, 3-4 Rooms. Catering to the comfort and convenience of tit* profession. 

Steam Heat and Electric Light - - - - »».M Up 



Phon*: Gr*eley $373-1174 . JOBK RK1LLY. Proprietress 

1, 2. 8 and 4 Booms, from $3.8$ p*r Weak Upwards— Housekeeping Privileges 

MARION HOTEL 

Private Baths N*wly Renovated 

156 West 35th Street, off Broadway, New York City 



HALL 



365 TO 3S9 WEST 61ST STREET \ Phon*: Bryant 7ISZ 

An elevator, flropfW building of th* n/jwett tm.lhavln* every dSvfos and •osvsnlsnes. 

Apartment* sre beautifully arranged, and soailit *f 2, 9 and 4 re***, with kitchen and 

kltehenettss, tlltd bath aid 'phon*. $17.00 Up Weeny. 

Address all communications to Charles Tenenbaam, Irvlngton Hail. 

No connection with any other " 



she suffered a aocond stroke while Bitting in 
a chair, This produced the state of coma. 
Mrs. Kaufmunn was 07 years old. 

Besides her husband, and son, Irving, she 
leaves three sons, Jobn, of Lynbrook, L. I., 
Charles, of Russell, and Harry, of tbls city, 
and two daughters, Mrs Ida Dale, of Utlca, ana 
Mrs. Samuel Sheperd, of Roxbury, Mass. 

Theodore W. Wharton, of Wharton, Inc., 
»late last week closed negotiations for the 
leasing of the Bachna skating rink at Ithaca, 
N. Y., and will transform the building Into 
a motion picture studio for the production of 
the new Patbe serial, "The Crooked Dagger." 
It will require one month to complete the 
alterations and work on tbe picture will start 
about Aug. 18. Jack Norworth will be the 
star of the film. 

Tbe skating rink failed to pay dividends, 
and was closed some time ago. 

The old Wharton, Inc., studio, at Ren- 
wick Park, was but recently leased by the 
Whartons to Grossman Pictures, Inc. Harry 
Grossman is at Ithaca arranging for the 
filming of "A Million Dollars Reward," also 
a Patbe release. 

•fore Sanford, known to vaudeville as "The 
Merry Former Boy," is back In Blngbamton, 
bis home town, for a brief vacation after 
srrvlce "over there" as a Knights of Colum- 
bus entertainer. Sanford traveled to France 
with the 77th Division and after his arrival 
played every division In tbe A. B. F. with the 
exception of six. After Jere gets through 
Paying his taxes, selling one of bis autoa and 
rehearsing his new act, vaudeville will tee 
him again. 



Starting as a boxer in the nineties, Jere has 
had an eventful career, which took him suc- 
cessively to training horBes, working as a 
steeplejack, in one of Corse Peyton's itoek 
companies, and finally to vaudeville. 



George Carter, professional musician, is out 
for tbe mayoralty nomination on any ticket 
in Elmlra. It turned down by those in power, 
says George, he "will ask the voters to write 
his name in, a democratic method of out- 
witting these self-arranging, self-appointed 
planners of our campaigns." 

Elmlra isn't the only city where the "wet" 
and "dry" question will play a prominent 
part In the municipal campaign. Syracuse 
will have a lively battle of its own. James 
E. Doyle, formerly managing editor of tbe 
Herald here, and now holding down a state 
Job, Is certain to be the Democratic candidate 
for mayor. Doyle's statement places him on 
a strictly "wet" platform. The Republican 
state shows the "drys" ' having a shade of 
tbe best of it, Syracuse went "wet" In its 
license election some time ago, although the 
G. O. P. boss, ex-Senator Francis Hendricks, 
openly declared for the "drys." Tbe G. O. P. 
this election are apparently basing their hopes 
upon the fact that soldier candidates will win 
soldier votes. . 



A second "human fly" hit Central New York 
last week, "Daredevil Johnny" Reynolds, fol- 
lowing upon the heels of Robert Broadway, 
i who has been In this vicinity for two weeks. 
Reynolds is playing in vaudeville and does 



M o¥oi T i1ioRTsPELHAM HEATH INN 

Pelham Parkway, at Ksstchester Avenue; and 

BLOSSOM HEATH INN 1 

Merrick Road, Lynbrook, L. I. Unequaled in Cuisine and Service. 

Open All Year Under direction of H. & J. Susskind 



THE ADELAIDE 

754-756 EIGHTH AVENUE 

Between 46th and 47th Street* On* Block West ef Broadway 

Three, Four and Five-Room High-Class Famished Apartments— $10 Up 
- ■—»—«—» MRS. GEORGE HIBOEL, Mar. Phone* i Bryant 8964-1 



Strictly Professional. 



ARDSLEY 

1890 
$12 WEEKLY AND UP 



WHEN IN NEW YORK 

nts, 

learrloeJ protection. 

ASHFORD 



Make arrangement* for our I, 2, 8, 4 room complete hoimkeeplng apartments, t 
accommodation Night and day senrlo*. Spsolsl rats* to the thsatrli 



Evwy 



SPECIAL SUMMER RATES 

BROADWAY MM 

At 83rd Street ' Bast Central Location Phone- rirri«>ini - 

ALBERT GUMBINBB, Manager CMHollH 



'•;f"!>* 



,: .5> 



srh 



his outside stunts as sort of press agent mat- 
ter.- Playing the Star at Ithaca last week, 
Reynolds climbed the McCray Block here. Hut 
plans to do some trapeze work from an aero- 

8 lane went, astray, due to conditions govern- 
ig Insurance carried yby the Thomae-Morse 
Aircraft Corporation, of Ithaca. Reynold* was 
In the aviation. 

Construction work on the Top, In S. flallnn 
etrnvi,, was resumed this week. The tbuatre 
wat> originally scheduled to open In May. 

The Liverpool Theatre la now offering vau- 
deville and picture* every Saturday. 




HOTEL 
CLARENDON 

North Clark and Ontario Stmt* 
- „ CHICAGO 

Klre lflnuto* from the &OOP 
Modern Convenience* 

Weekly Rates, 34 to $10 

Phone: Superior 8070 



TACOMA, WASH. 



By HURT M'MIIRTRIB. 
Tbe Northwest Peace Jubilee staged in this 
city under the direction of King Kelly, the 
proceeds of which were to go toward • 
memorial for the lude from Tacoma who lost 
tt-elr llvo* in the service, proved • failure, 
v!th * fJdi.OOD debt now facing the olty, ac- 
cording to final reports made by the commit- 
tee appointed Ut clear up the mess. Several 
Incal (nun'. ! n u have filed suit against the 
Jubilee committee for large bills unpaid. 

Bookings at the Tacoma Theatre, playing 
road attraction*, have kept that house open 
practically all through the past month. Recent 
showings have been the Bltlnge Revue, "Chin 
Chin," "Honor of the Family." "Lombard!, 
Ltd." "The Masquerader." 

Members of the various road ahowa playing 
the local Pantagea have been staging a show 
for the boys at the convalescent hospital, 
Camp Louis, each Wednesday, with member* 
of the orchestra going out to play for them. 

Georgia Tantln and Inei Patton, former 
owner of tbe Post Gardens, a local cabaret, 
urc now playing tbe Pan time. 

Manager Nick Plerong of the Hippodrome 
cvK'Cts to be transferred to the Ackertnan A 
furrlt house In Portland. ■ , 

VANCOUVER, B. C 

By H. P. NEWBERRY. 

EMPRESS.— Stock, "The Cabin In the 
Hills." • 

AVENGE.— "Lombard!, Ltd.." billed last 
week, but will not play this olty. Next, Guy 
Bates Post 

ROYAL.— Alice Joyce and Harry Moray in 
"Within the Law." This picture was at the 
Orpheum last week at SOo. top. Tbe price at 
this house Is 25c. 

ORPHEUM.— "Mickey." 

PANTAGES.— Vaudeville. 

COLUMBIA.— Vaudeville and pictures. 

REX.— "The Code of tbe Yukon." 

DOMINION.— "The Girl Who Stayed at 
Home." 

GLOBE.— "A Midnight Romance," 2d week. 

COLONIAL.— First half, "The Service Star." 

MAPLE LEAP. — "The Lion and the 
Mouse." 



INERS 
AKE-UP 



HsWRV C Mlttn, Inc. 



8tiS." ADWAY, ~" The "*" ot w • ,twl, 
d Tbe te ? mDreM *nd M ar« being n- 

The Empress Players in revival of "Little 
kissed HPP tol,ow,d * " Tn « Ca ' 

The Royal Is now playing the same picture 
attractions as the Orpheum fa week liter 

Nettle Nichol, local dancer, appeared last 

week at ,the Empres s In a s poofaltr^ 

Mlschel Chernlavsky of the Oheralavsky 
Trio Is at present In this city and will be 
Joined soon by his brothers, Leo and Jan. who 
are at present In Honolulu. w 

WASHINGTON, DX. 

i F UARDIB MEAK1N. , 

The new season was offlolally opened Monday 
with but one ot the theatres lagging, the Na- 
tional's attraction being canceled at the last 
moment. In splto of the terrlno heat buslassa 
Is opening fairly welL « 

8HUBKKT.BKLA8CO.— "The Red Dawn." a 
drama of tbe revolution written, produced and 
presented by tbe author. Thomas Dixon. Th* 
cast Includes Uonraldlua, Auatln Webb, Mr. 
and Mrs. De Witt Jennlng*. Willis Evans and 
Flora MacDonoId. 

NATIONAL.— At the last minute announce- 
ments from William Fowler, manager of this 
house, were Issued to the effect that "Tin 
Pajamas" would not open Monday, after an ex- 
tensive advortlfclug campaign. "A Regular 
Fellow" comey In Monday, for the week, Isav 
lng this house dark this week. 

SHUBERT-GAUR1CK.— The Garrlck Players 
In the first production of Fred Jackson's new 
farce, "One a Minute," with Lynne Overman, 
Juvenile man of the company, In the lead. 
(Notice elsewhcro in this Issue.) Th* two 
weeks devoted to "Daddy Long Legs" by this 
company were very prntVflhl*, bu*Tn*ss being 
excellent. ^^ 

FOLI'S.— The film, "The Beginning and Mys- 
teries of Life," after three weeks at the 8hn- 
bert-BelaBco, has been moved to this house 
for an additional week. 

COSMOS.— "At the Club," Bert and Estelle 
Gordon, Martha Hamilton and Co, In "The 
Instalment Collector," Peyton, Howard and 
Llzzette. a trio ot tramps; Fields and Welle, 
Harry Auger and Nettle Packer. 

LOEWS PALACIO.-Catberlne Calvert la 
"Tbe Career of Katherlne Bush." 

LOEWS COLUMBIA.— Wallace Reld In "The 
Love Burglar." 

MOORE'S itiALTO.— Anita Stewart In "Mary 
Regan." 

CRANDALL'S METROPOLITAN.— Virginia 
Pearson in "The Love Auction." 

The Garden, one of th* Crandall chain ot 
theatres In tbls ntty, closed Saturday. Re- 
opening date ret for Sunday. 



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We Supply the Needs of the Amusement Market 



AGENCY 



STARS 
HEADLINERS 
and FEATURES 



VAUDEVILLE 
LEGITIMATE 
and PICTURES 



America- Now Booking Season 1919-1920— Europe 

PROGRESSIVE ARTISTS WRITE OR CALL AT ONCE 

'We Offer the Maximum Possibility for Advancement to Established or New Material 

SUPERLATIVE SERVICE 

Obtained Through Experience and Efficiency Has ■ 

Worked to the Mutual Advantage of Manager and Artist V 

RESULTS COUNT ' 

You Need Only to Glance at the Following List of Well-Known Talent Who Have Been 



LILLIAN RUSSELL 
ALICE LLOYD 
NORA BAYES 
ANNETTE KELLERMAN 
JULIAN ELTINGE 
BLANCHE RING 
FRITZS SCHEFF 
/ LOUISE DRESSER 
and JACK GARDNER 
MAUD LAMBERT 
and ERNEST BALL 
VALESKA SURATT 
DICKINSON 
and DEAGON 
LEO CARILLO 
FARBER GIRLS 
VALERE BERGERE 



Successful Under the Casey Banner: 

SINGERS MIDGETS 
MLLE. DAZIE 



R1GOLETTO BROTHERS 
DAINTY MARIE MEEKER 
OFFICER YOKES and DON 
POLLY MORAN 
ARNAUT BROS. 
RITA MARIO & CO. 
IVAN BANKOFF 
MADAM ELLIS; 
EMMA HAIG and 
JACK WALDRON 
JULIUS TANNEN 
NONETTE 
CHARLOTTE 
GREENWOOD 



PAT 



FISK O'HARA 
SIX BROWN BROS. 
THE GREAT ASAHI, THE KITAMURA BROS. AND OTHER FAMOUS JAPANESE ACTS 

LIEUT. JAMES EUROPE'S BAND 

Address All Correspondence To Pat Casey, Gen. Mgr. 

THE PAT CASEY AGENCY 

PUTNAM BLDG., 1493 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

The Largest Individual Source of All Descriptions 
of Theatrical Talent in the World. 



PAT 



AG ENCY 



AG ENCY 



If- 



I a. .:-.-' 



MO V IN G PICTURES WW3fc,— ~ 






NEWS OF THE FILM WORLD 



"Shadows of the Past" is the title of the 
_ re x t Vita, in which Anita Stewart Is featured. 

World releases for August include four flve- 
[ reel features. 

Ronald A. Reader, Vita., has gone to France, 
where he will open a number of sales offices. 

Diaz Callahan will represent the Realart In 
. Texas with headquarters at Dallas. ' 

/ 

The World Film Corporation will shortly re- 
lease a picturjzatlon of Charles Neville Buck's 
' notel, "When Bearcat Went Dry." 

'■■■: World has engaged Sam Hardy >s leading 
; man for June Blvldge In "His Father's Wife," 
. which will be a September release. 

Joseph Levy, who has been handling 
"Mickey" in Nebraska and Iowa, Is In New 
.To*. 



World has secured the distribution of "When 
Bear Cat Went Dry." It is to be released 
. early next month. 

Herbert E. Hancock has been engaged as 
editor of the new topical weekly to be Issued 
by the Fox Film Corp. in September. 

Tom Ince has offered a prize of 15,000 tor 
the first non-stop aviation journey from New 
York to Frisco. 



Edwin Carew has resigned from Metro and 
will direct Dorothy Caselnelll in a aeries of 
five reelers. 



Frances Mann will be starred in a series 
. of features to be released through the Pathe 
exchanges. * 



' Tb Eastern Film Co., 59 Church street. Boa- 
ton, Mass.,' completely destroyed by fire July 

; 27. Damage estimated at $40,000. 

&-•' 

:c Rex Beach, Rupert Hughes and Gertrude 
Atherton are now all at Culrer City, work- 

t lag on their pictures. , 



£ John Bowers has signed a new contract 
with Ooldwyn which will keep him busy till 
November, 1020. 

Gerald C. Duffy, formerly editor of "Picture 
Play Magazine," has joined the Goldwyn staff 
as a scenario writer. 



John W. Noble has been added to the Vita. 
directing staff. He is at present at work on 
Gladys Leslie's new release. 



"A Lonely Romeo" opened at the Caalno 
July 28. For the last seven weeks it had been 
at the Shubert. 

0. R. Seelye, secretary TJnlted Pictures, 
left July 28 for a visit to the Southern ex- 
changes, with Atlanta bis first atop. 

Arthur F. Beck has leased/ the Crystal 
studios and laboratories located in the Bronx 
and the Pathe studios in Jersey City. 

James Dent has been appointed assistant to 
Myron SeUntck, president of Selcnlck Picture 
Corp. | • 

William H. Rlppard has been appointed 
manager of the Washington branch of Real- 
art Pictures. Mr. Rlppard is an old news- 
paperman. 

\ World Pictures announces a change la the 
name of the release scheduled for Aug. 25 
from "The Man Without a Name". to "The 
Clouded Name." • • • 

Arthur F. Beck has bought ont Harry 
Raver, former president ■ of the Artco Pro- 
ductlons and has assumed- the position at the 
head of the organisation. 

Homer Howard has been' assigned to Buffalo 
as manager of that branch tor United Pic- 
tures. Mr. Howard succeeds Lester D. Wolfe, 
resigned. 



i 



leador M. Stern, formerly of "The Globe,"' 
is now in charge of the exploitation depart- 
ment of Sol Leaser's "Yankee Doodle In Ber- 
lin." 

Ruth Clifford has been engaged by Vita to 
playing the leading role opposite Barle Will- 
lams In bis next feature, "The Black Cats," 
which Is based on a story by Billiard Booth. 

"Three Miles Out" Is the name of a new 
muBlcal comedy which John Cort will produt 
next season. It Is the work of J. Edward 
Cort and Walter Llndlar. 

J. Warren Kerrigan's next feature is en- 
titled, "A White Man's Chance." It Is from 
the story by Johnston McCulley and was 
directed by Ernest C. Warde. 



Doris Kenyon's support in the film version 
of Louie Joseph Vance's novel "The Band- 
box," will be Logan Paul, Walter McEwan, 
Helen Montrose, Margaret Western. 

Lieut. Earle Metcalfe has been engaged by 
World Pictures to star with Virginia Ham- 
mond in "The Battler" to be released durirJg 
September. 

Earl Metcalf has replaced Montagu Love in 
the World production, "The Battler." The 
latter was forced to retire from the east on 
account of rheumatism. 

H. B. Herbert has been engaged as leading 
man to Mae Muray In her latest Perret pro- 
duction, "The A. B. C.'a of Love," which is 
now being filmed. 

Earl Hudson is laying out a 16-page house 
organ that la to be Issued to the First Na- 
tional Exchanges. It Is entitled "Contact," 
and is \o be an inter office communication. 

Meyer Solomon, formerly house manager for 
Meyer and Schneider, William Fox and for 
Dave Picker, has joined the sales force of 
the Select N. Y. Exchange 

Wo, S, Hart has signed with Famous Play- 
ers Lasky for two years more, his contract 
calling for nine features within the con- 
tractual period. 

Louis B. Mayer is to Issue the Anita Stew- 
art Book of Children's Rhymes and Games 
through the Wool worth chain of stores. . The 
book was compiled by William Leahy. 

Robert Edeson baa been engaged by Myron 
Selznick to play .In the second Eugene O'Brien 
reduction, "Sealed Hearts." Lucille Stewart 
wilt hftve the leading feminine role. 



•'■,. 



Samuel Pearson won a Judgment tor 1400.20 
from the Maetorcraft Pictures Corporation 
last week on several notes he bad "*ut up to 
back the production of Thomas Dixon's "The 
One Woman." 

Douglas .Fairbanks' first picture to be re- 
leased by the United Artists Corporation has 
been titled "His Majesty the American." 
Marjory Daw plays , the leading female role 
and Joseph Hennaberry directed. 



Oscar Strauss, the Vlennesse light opera 
composer, la organising a tour of the United 
States for himself and a number of Aus- 
traln composers and singers for next spring, 
if passports can be obtained. 

Select announces one special and two star 
series attractions tor release during August. 
They are Guy Empey in "The Undercurrent" ; 
Olive Thomas. "The Spite Bride," and Eugene 
O'Brien In "The Perfect Lover." 

Earl Bmlay, inventor of the Novograph 
high speed camera, is now working on a new 
machine" to -be -called the Stereospeed, which 
is expected to give even greater analysis of 
various motions, ' 



Judge Julian M. Mack, of the Federal Dis- 
trict Court, July 28, granted a decree asked 
for by the Exhibitors' Mutual, enjoining the 
Robertson-Cole Co. from canceling a con- 
tract for the distribution of the plaintiff's 
films. The chief question on the part of the 
defendants seemed to be the financial re- 
sponsibility. This Judge Mack found to be 
sufficient 



Ben S. Cohan has been appointed as man- 
ager of Select's Denver branch in the place 
of Oren F. Woody, who has been placed in 
another official position In the organization. / 

Horace T. Clark, Australian representative 
for First National, has recently returned from 
a complete tour of the Orient, and he left 
Sydney for New York on July 9. 

Select has opened exchanges In Indian- 
apolis, Salt Lake City and Albany, with Sam 
Sax, Bob Brackett and Charles Walder In 
charge, respectively. 



W. E. Rayner, vice-president of the F. I. 
L. M. Club and manager of the Pathe Ex- 
change, was married July 16. S. Bckman, Jr., 
manager of the Goldwyn Exchange, was 
married on the same day. 



James F. Kelly and Emma Pollock arrived 
In New York July 28, bavlng returned from 
entertaining the A. E. F. in France. They 
sailed with the first unit of the "Over There 
Theatre League." - ■■■■.'. -,-. 

Greta Hartman, Lorraine Harding and Ea- 
ward Keppler, a Belgian actor, nave been 
added by Dei t rich-Beck, Inc., to the cast 
now filming the serial based on "The. Band 
Box," -a novel by Louis Joseph Vance. 

■'".' '. '■<%, 

Arthur Beck has signed Alex. Gaden to ap- 
pear in the Dei t rich-Beck production af Louis 
Joseph Vance's "The Bandbox." starring 
Doris Kenyon. Mr. Gaden hails from vaude- 
ville. ■. _ v • - 

Eleanor O'Keefe, one of the partners of the 
Chester Beecroft exporting firm, sailed for 
Copenhagen on the Stavangerfjord last week. 
She will visit the Scandanavtan Film Agency, 
which Is represented by her, firm in this conn, 
try. 



,:. ■ •&«&& 

■ m 




r^^^^^^^^^^^^ma 



THE BEAUTY OF THE NEW YORK SEASON 

CONSTANCE 
BINNEY 

The public applauded her, the critics acclaimed her, the newspapers 
interviewed her, the illustrated press spread her fair photographs 
far and wide. A new theatrical celebrity was born! She continues 
scoring big in 138 East," the current New York success. 

CONSTANCE BINNEY 

has the priceless gifts of Youth, Beauty, Talent. Can't yon Just 
visualize this lovely girl in such a part, for instance, as a little slavey 
in a Pennsylvania Dutch settlement, later blossoming into glorious 
young womanhood? ' 

Such a role will introduce her as a star to your patrons in Mrs. 
Fiske's wonderful stage success 

"ERSTWHILE SUSAN" 

Founded on the widely known novel, "Barnabetta," by Helen R. 
Martin. Now in production. 

Director, JOHN S. ROBERTSON 

Realart Pictures Corporation 

ARTHUR S. KANE, President 

112 West 42nd Street, New. York 







PICTURES 



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52 MO V IN G P I C T U R E S 



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AMONG THE WOMEN 






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With large capable cast and novelty 
exterior scenes, "Bringing Up Betty," 
featuring "Evelyn Greeley, makes an in- 
teresting feature. Mary Turner Gor- 
don's beautiful gray hair and smart 
appropriate gowning added much to 
the production, and there war another 
stunning gray-haired matron playing a 
small part. Grace Carlile" was Adele 
' Shelby, the Bank Secretary, and han- 
dled the part in a natural capable man- 
ner. She wore dark, well made, one 
Siece dresses, and in one scene, a 
owered chiffon summer frock, medium 
sailor shaped hat and heavy lace veil 
specially becoming. Evelyn Greeley, 
as the spoiled darling of a devoted 
uncle, showed indulgence in her gown- 
ing. A pretty dinner dress of taffeta 
had a deep box-plaited fluting of the 
silk running from middle of front to 
back, dropping low over hip, that was 
an effective touch. The fine tucked 
georgette bodice of another model was 
tightly drawn into the full skirt by a 
broad belt of same material. A fetch- 
ing bathing suit and some good look- 
ing outing clothes were exhibited by 
Miss Greeley. 

'The Hornet's Nest" is an Earl Wil- 
liams feature, but gives Vola Vale and 
Muriel Fletcher opportunities to shine 
in widely different parts. As Freda 
Whitefield, the vamp, Miss Vale 
showed leaning toward fitted modes 
of ne» and sequins. Two were some- 
what similar in lines. A dark sequin, 
long jersey fitting top part over a 
white or silver foundation skirt, and 
an opalesque or iridescent fitted waist 
over a dark sequin skirt were both 
effective. Miss Fletcher, as the niece, 
wore more youthful clothes. A metal- 
lic cloth evening dress, untrimmed, 
had long loose sleeves of georgette, 
and a velvet gown also showed geor- 
gette sleeves. A checked riding habit 
coat and light trousers, a short Vel- 
vet jacket closing at neck under a lace 
collar with a becoming velvet hat 
trimmed with a jaunty feather in back 
and a sable cape, were all costume fea- 
tures of the production. 

Ten men and ten women on the 
American first half program seemed 
promising entertainment, but it didn't 
pan out at all satisfactory. Emma 
and Boyd, two girls', opened the bill 
with double traps and teeth work- 
doing some pretty rope work. Throw- 
ing aside blue satin wraps lined with 
, pink, they worked in neat white satin 
buster dresses belted in with lilac rib- 
bon. 

Sabbott and Brooks includes pretty 
Marie Sabbott,"' who was quite out of 
her element in burlesque last season. ' 
Her costumes are far above the aver- 
age displayed on small time and so are 
her youthful face and physique for 
that matter. Brooks carries her on 
the stage under his arm and drops 
her on the stage, a pretty bundle of 
lace and ribbon frou frou. For a jazz 
number she wears an eccentric blue 
feather dress, quite Tanguayesque. An 
odd white iridescent splashed bonnet, 
backed up with blue feathers, set on 
her blonde curls and blue metal cloth 
pants edged with silver fringe came 
to just above the bare knees. An or- 
chid georgette and lace sparkling with 
tiny brilliants had a dozen blue metal- 
lic cloth panels or petals, falling over- 
skirt The body was of solid bril- 
liants finished in the back with a bow 
of the blue and orchid. A wide head 
bandeau of the blue was caught to- 
gether on one side with a bunch of 
aigrettes. This curley haired ( blond 
closely resembles dancing Bertha Glea- 
son. 

The woman of Faber and McGowan 
opened in a Frenchy looking high- 
necked rose pink silk, brought up in a 
bustle drapery at back and closed in a 



tucked sheer lavendar frock with high 
bib bodice, not at all becoming to her 
figure. \ 

Fatima has two girls in Egyptian cos- 
tume perform three, dances between 
her numbers, finishing with her in her. 
familiar Water Carrier dance, which it ; 
I remember rightly is supposed to rep- 
resent Egyptian water carriers at day- 
break stopping to make their morning 
salutation and homage dance to the 
sun. Black and gold sash and trou- 
sers and gold slashed skirt spangled 
in gold and scarlet worn with brilliant 
studded zouaves, were. correctly Egyp- 
tian and decidedly becoming. Fatima 
is sure one woman in vaudeville who 
could shimmy, if they would let her. 

Josephine, of Van Bergen and Jose- 
phine, was arrayed in a picturesque 
gown of lace and Persian silk rib- 
bon insertings with a lace flounce at 
bottom. The waist was of plain white 
silk and the big hat of the combined 
materials, trimmed with long ends of 
narrow pink and blue ribbons. Mrs. 
Hill, in an impossible sketch was in a 
very domestic housewifely negligee of 
blue chiffon trimmed with lace flounc- 
ing. 

The little woman of Bell and Gray 
opened in a blue silk cape trimmed 
with self-tone marabout, a saucy little 
hat with feathers tipped over one eye- 
brow. A frilly pink frock was used 
for the wire opening and several char- 
acter changes followed— making a 
rather pretentious closing act for two 
little folks. >•! ' 

There was a rarely good program at 
Henderson's Coney Island this week, 
even though there may have been a 
little too much dancing. The artistic 
offering of Ivan Bankoff and his fair 
dancing partner did not receive its 
usual recognition in the way pf ap- 
plause, and Frisco found it hard going 
in the early part of his act Loretta 
McDermott drew down the major por- 
tion of the applause herself. Miss Mc- 
Dermott's splendid work and person- 
ality are becoming more pronounced 
each time she is seen. ■■ ■ 

There can be no doubt as to Francis 
Renault's success. He was the flash 
of the bill and genuinely appreciated 
despite his numbers seeming ill chosen. 
Before brown flowered pretonne drop, 
paneled with golden brown velvet, he 
appeared in a quartet of stunning 
gowns. A purple creation had its foun- 
dation embroidered in iridescents 
showing through a long georgette 
drapery. It fell over one shoulder and 
arm into a long sweeping train, the 
overdress was caught up at side in 
two places with three purple ostrich 
tips and a chapeau was built up high 
with the same sort of feathers. A 
white and silver brocaded with Rus- 
sian type of fancy headdress, trimmed 
elaborately with pearls, was worn for 
a bride number. There was an extreme- 
ly long train of net and the skirt was 
caught up on one hip in a fan-like 
arrangement both novel and effective. 
He was an old-fashioned picture in 
blue faille, the skirt, kerchief, elbow 
sleeves and pantalettes trimmed with 
tiny fringed frills of the same mate- 
rial, .fink feather pompoms decorated 
the wired hem of skirt at intervals 
and a large uncurled ostrich plume lay 
flat on the brim of a huge blue poke 
bonnet. For a closing spectacular 
"gasp," Mr. Renault appeared in a 
clinging black sequin model slightly 
trained. The entire front was em- 
broidered in a handsome brilliant de- 
sign and long flowing black satin drap- 
ery was embroidered in silver thread. 
A huge black capeline, faced with 
white, was heavy with two great 
sprays of natural paradise, and he car- 
ried a staff tipped with black ostrich 
plumes. The palm, of smart theatrical 



dressing for female, impersonators 
should certainly be given to this am- 
bitious young man who 1 never makes a • 
New York appearance, at least, with- 
out showing something new. 
■ If Harriet Setback's plumpness don't 
worry her any more than it does the 
audience she should be most content. 
An abbreviated double-flounced light 
green, silver brocade "hiked" up on 
sides, showing lacy bloomers and. 
throughout her strenuous work her 
nicely dressed coiffure remained "put." 
Miss Houghton (Sully and Houghton) 
looked cool and summery in a simple 
b|ue organdie. Miss Phebe (with Ban- 
koff), Loretta McDermott (with Fris- 
co) and Marion Bent (Rooney and 
Bent) were all attractively garbed in 
costumes reviewed previously at 
' Broadway houses. 

There wasn't a new item on the Pal- 
ace bill this week, from Camilla^s. 
Birds- to Bostock s Riding School, ex- 
cept a new bit offered by Lucille Cava- 
nagh and Mel Craig, an impersonation 
of Loretta McDermott and Frisco, 
voted by many the best thing on the 
program. Miss Cavanagh made a 

Sretty speech begging indulgence for 
aving returned to the Palace with 
her old act, but said she and Mr. Craig 
had learned a new dance she was "just 
dying to do," and "if they could stand 
i a little more," etc. Mme. Camilla was 
daintily clad in draped and ruffled ma- 
fine skirt, topped with a pink satin 
bodice and looked very small working 
in the black cloth and yellow floral 
backing. 

Ottie Ardine (McKay and Ardjne) 
opened in a short black satin jacket 
and tarn and white satin skirt, making 
her usual changes and closing in her 
blue georgette silver paneled wrap. 

Marie Nordstrom's frock was built 
on familiar lines, tight bodice and skirt 
draped high across the body to one 
hip. A blue ostrich tip nestled in the 
hip drapery and one on either shoul- 
der looked as if they were just stuck 
i there, as the net shoulder straps were 
barely discernible. The material of 
gown was a delightful changeable or- 
chid blue silk. ' . 

Miss Cavanagh and Amelia Stone 
were charmingly attired and the Bos- 
tock Riding School principals were, as 
usual, attired in spotless white. 



& 



Vivian Martin is very sweet in 
Frances Hodgson Burnette's pretty 
story of "Louisiana." The mountain 
characters were well handled by Noah 
Beery and Arthur Allardt as was the 
title role of the mountain girl, by Miss 
Martin. There was a shallie dress, 
with a tucked yoke outlined with two 
small ruffles and a plain full skirt 
trimmed with small ruffles and tied 



COAX ME. 

Thfe Is a World five-reel feature In which 
June Blvtdge Is starred. It la said to be oj 
adaptation by Philip Lonergan and Will 0. 
Murphey from a famoue old play and pro- 
duced under the direction of Gilbert Hamilton. 

Despite tbe fact that this film often a very 
thin plot, with a lack of originality, it never- 
theless Is not devoid of entertainment, and has 
several bright spots. It la a society comedy 
with Just a touch of meller. 

There are numeroua faults of direction, 
and the continuity Is Jumpy. One ln? c 
stance Is enough to illustrate the former.) 
There are three private detectives In the story, 
and they are made to act like burglars. In, 
fact the impression is conveyed that they are 
kidnappers until away near the end of the; 
picture. . 'f 

There are some very handsome settings in 
the picture, and the exteriors are picturesque.. 
with many scenes laid In fine old gardens and 
plenty of water. Feminine fans will like the 4 
picture because of its elaborate display of 
gowns and well defined social atmosphere. The, 
outdoor scenes are extremely well done, the 
grouping pleaalng and some excellent pho- 
tography helps to send the feature along. Mtej 
Elvldge la surrounded with a good company, 
all of whom handle their parts Intelligently. ■ 

In spite of several Incongruities and some J 
minor defects, "Coax He" is not an uninterest- 
ing summer offering. 

THE BELLE OFTHE SEASON 

There are a number of good features about. 
this society drama produced by Metro aa a five-, 
reeler In which Emmy Whalen la starred. The 
direction and setting are unusually good, ana 
the continuity la easy, to follow. It la a likable 
story, and there is no lack of action. The fast 
clip with which the picture starts is main' 
talned until the end, and there are a number 
-of stirring scenes. •' 

' It la weepy In spots, and there are time* 
occasionally when one la Inclined to weep ti- 
the heroine instead of with her. JfevertheJess, - 
there is a lot of heart IntereRt in the story, 
and it has an appeal. Miss Whalen has an- 
peared in better pictures and some which have 
been Inferior. 

It la an old, old subject, but treated differ- 
ently, and It la thla difference wherein the 
interest lies. Miss Whalen takes the part ot 
a society belle whose millions had been earned,-, 
by an organization which had ground down v.', 
ita employes to starvation wages. When the " 
heroine cornea ot age she takes the manage- 
ment of her affairs out of the hands of heart- 
less executora and Immediately starts In to 
improve the conditions of the workers through 
whom she has amassed her fortune. 

Oeraldlne Keen (Mlsa Whalen) is naturally 
drawn to James Alden (8. Rankin Drew), tbe 
eon of a prosperous newspaper owner, who has, 
against the wishes of his father, given $10,000 
toward the foundation of a settlement house.., 
From then on It is not difficult to see how! 
the picture will end, but before the final clinch 
there are a number of clever scenes, the de- 
tails ot which have been well worked out 



with a sash that is a duplicate of one 
every grown woman of today 'had, 
when she was a little girl, if she hap- 
pened to live in the country. City 
clothes quite transformed her. Lillian 
West as Olive Ferol, a northern so- 
ciety weary woman, wore a negligee 
"robe, of brocade, with the top of geor- 
gette blousing just at the hips, that 
was unusual looking, and a good look- 
ing net evening gown, the bodice, long 
sleeves and skirt banded with wide 
gold lace inserting. Aunt Cassandry, 
played by Leighton, was splendid, and 
a good laugh in the glory of her new 
finery. 



INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

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Peuben CXmuels 

IVeal Service 

1 tssrszrS&B&mhn 



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Publicity Makes the Movies Move! 

(BOSEMARIB) (ARTHUR) 

BOLTON and GLASS 

SYNDICATED PUBLICITY 



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Los Angeles, Cal. 

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"f 









STRAND. , 

Jack Eaton made bla debut tbla weak as 
managing director of tbe Strand by presenting 
a fairly diversified entertainment beaded wttn 
the Paramount production, "The Lore Burglar," 
starring Wallace Reld, aa tbe principal offer- 
ing. Other than that there waa nothing par- 
ticularly of note In tbe bill. 

The overture waa the excerpts from "Naughty 
Marietta," very well handled, and followed by 
a scenic of tbe Outing-Chester series. The 
Strand Topical Review followed and held 
several Heme of Interest A touch of bird 
life In color waa Included. It did not eeem to 
fit In with tbe news scheme of tblngs. 

Dorothy South, soprano, offered "Starlight 
Love" just ahead of tbe feature. Malcolm 
McRacbern,' tbe basso, followed it with two 
numbers, scoring wltb both. 

A screen magazine supplement showing Mary 
Flckfnrd at home was next Introduced, The 
second of the "Hall Room Boys" comedy series 
entitled "A Howling Success" followed. The 
current release Is a little better than tbe drat 
Issued. • J*red» 

THE LOvTbURGLAR. 

David Strong Wallace Retd 

Joan Gray Anna Q. NUsson 

Smith - Raymond Hntton 

Cnaot-to-Coaat Taylor Wallace Beery 

Miner.'. i Wilton Taylor 

Arthur Strong Edward Rurna 

Elsie Strong .' .........Alice Taffe 

Hoswell Dirk Wayne 

Dave Borgan Henry Woodward 

Mrs. Strong....' Loyola O'Connor 

"The Love Burglar," a Leaky produced 
Paramount production, with Wallace Reld aa 
the star, Is based, on tbe .Tack Latt play, "One 
of Da," which waa originally presented by 
Oliver Morocco. It made a very -pleasing and 
hlghlv entertaining screen entertainment, and 
Mr. Reld scored effectively In the heroic rolo 
of tbe production. His leading lady, Anna Q. 
NINson. waa also delightful aa tbe slumming 

•'■- authoress, The picture has punch enough to 

i~y*» shown In any house. 

The Lalt play was adapted for the screen by 
Walter Woods, while James Cruse directed the 
production. Craze baa handled the story In 
, great shape, getting over .bla dive and crook 

jr-^atmoRphere wltb a wallop. Hie types are per- 

l -fectlon, and tbe fight stuff that be staged la ad 
' realistic It reminds one of tbe uld days at 
8weeney"a. 

Tbe story opens In the dive, with Its attend- 
ant cabaret and a tremendous rain storm rag- 
ing nut«1ile. Th» evWInr atnff Is (rood, twit 
the Interior overshadows It completely. Miss 
Nllssnn la the cabaret singer who la really 
an Authoress looking for local color, while 
Wallace Beery playa tbe role of Cnast-to- 
Coast Taylor, who falls In love wltb her and 
wants her for bis "dame." Reld piers tbe 
society boy who poses as tbe "Colt Kid" In 
order to get out of a Jam after be has pulled 
his brother out of tbe dive and sent him 'home. 
The development of tbe love story from tbla 
point on Is filled with ausnense and cansbly 
handled by tbe director. The society features 
are full of color, and there are occasional 
eomedv tenches that fit the picture perfectly. 
Ravwond Hafton and Wilton Taylor have char- 
acter roles that give them several chsncea, 
and tVv deliver on each occasion. This Is 
especially true of Hatton as Parson Smith. 

VThe Love Burglar" ta a corking feature that 
Is well worth while. Fred. 



>i 



&. 






RIVOLI. 

Norma Talmadge In her latest production, 
"The Way or a Woman," baaed on Eugene 
Wslter'a play. "Nsncv Lee," and a Dnlv«>rsal 
comedy were the salient points of the Rlvoll 
prorram for the current week. The Talmadge 
picture Is one of the best that she hss appeared 
In In several months. It Is tbe .type of story 
that she annesrs to greatest advantage In, and 
with the east that la surrounding her It ml«ht 
easllv be termed an all-star production. The 
eomedv Is entitled "A Baby Doll Bandit." and 
has Joe Martin, tbe Universal chimp, as tbe 
star actor. It Is a real laugh producer.' 

The overture Is Massenet's "Phedre." which 
Is followed by a Bruce scenic, after which a 
dance number waa offered by Tulle Llndabl. 
The Rlvoll Pictorial was Interesting. 

The vocal offerings of the bill were Mark 
Wln«ton, formerly a camp community song 
leader, who offered "Tnvlctus," and Vincent 
Bach In "Love's Old Sweet Bong." Fred. 

THE WAY~oTa WOMAN. 

Nancy Lea Norma Talmadge 

Anthony Weir Conway Tearle 

Mrs. Lee Gertrude Berkeley 

Mr. Lee ..........Colonel Vernon 

Grace Lee • • • Mae McA voy 

Mnllle Wise Jobyna Howland 

Johnnie Flinch J Hassard Short 

Douglas Weir Oeorge LaGuerre 

Nathan Caspar William Humphreys 

Oeorge Trevor Stuart Holmea 

The latest Select release starring Norma 
Talmadge Is a screen adaptation of the Eugene 
Walter play, "Nancy Lee," presented under 
the title of "The Way of a Woman." In It 
Miss Talmadge comes back to her own, for 
the atory la of the type that la beat suited 
to her, and the production has been wonder- 
fully well bandied under tbe direction of 
Robert Z. Leonard. It Is a picture produc- 
tion that will pull patronage to any house 
and satisfy any audience, 

There has been no money eaved In tbe pro- 
duction or caBt, and tbe producers could well 
hang out the "all-star cast" sign on this pic- 
ture. Supporting Miss Talmadge are Jobyna 
Howland, Conway Tearle, George LeGuerre, 
Stuart Holmes, Haizard Short and other; 
equally as well known. The picture Itself 
abounds In pretty sets, and the atar herself 
sutdoea her bestprevlous wort 

The atory o f "The Way of a Woman? isjbat_ 



of a proud Southern girl of an Impoverished 
family who cornea to New York to make bsi 
way. She skates along the thin Ice that divides 
the line between the salamander and "detained 
lady" and loses the man that she loves when 
she -marries a Broadway rounder for his * 
money, so that she will be able to contribute 
lavishly to the aupport of the old folks at 
home. The death of her huaband and the re- 
turn of •the rear man of her heart and the 
complications that beset the reconcllatfon of 
the two form the basis of the plot It Is well 
worked out, with plenty of comedy Interest 
to send the laugh along in the right place. 

MIsb Talmadge handled the role of the South- 
ern girl moat cleverly, but to Jobyna Howland 
must- go tbe credit for the laugh- producing of 
the picture. These are the two women of the 
picture who stand out In the male section 
tbe honors are about equally divided between 
Conway Tearle, Oeorge LeGuerre and Stuart 
Holmes. Hazzard Short acts aa a comedy foil 
for Miss Howland. 

In directing the stcry Mr. Leonard developed 
It consistently, and his action at all times 
furthers the trend of the story. Tbe pho- 
tography and the lighting are very good 
throughout 

"The Way of a Woman** will land anywhere, 
: Fred, 

RIALTO. 

In spite of the heat there was a crowd In 
line at tbe Rlalto waiting for tbe doors to open ■ 
on Sunday afternoon, July 27. The program 
was light and breezy. If the weather waa not 
The feature picture waa Dorothy Olsb In "Nug- 
get Nell" (reviewed lo this Issue). There 
were laughs enough in this and "Shades of 
Shakespeare," a Christie comedy, to make one 
almost forget the heat 

"Jolly Robbers." the overture, waa a pleasant 
musical jumble by Franz yon 8uppe, and was 
well received. "A Day and a Night at Coney 
Island," Educational De Luxe film, helped to 
keep one cool with Its celluloid eplo of the 
seashore. It showed all the various water 
sports' at the noted resort, and at the same 
time had a comic touch, when the action of a 
lot of awlmmera and divers were reversed.' 
Thus a man who made a high 'dive would be 
seen to ascend the same- distance with head 
down. .•»<■!;• 

itosa Lesca sang "Spring Voices" and Greek 
Evans, "And He Played on His Old." An 
organ recital by Arthur Depew closed the 
program. 

nuggeTnell 

Nugget Nell ..Dorothy Olsb 

51* 2, eart l d J,m ••••• ...David Butler 

The City Chap . . . Raymond Cannon 

The Chleld.... Reglna Sarle 

First Badman. ! . .James Farley 

Second Ditto Bob Fleming 

Nell'a Uncle Wilbur Hlgeby 

The Ingenue.. ........Emily Chichester .„ 

Dorothy GlBh is a wild. Western gun 
woman In a burlesque travesty on the wild 
and wooly West, aa seen In pictures. In a 
Paramount feature at the Rlalto, the current 
week. Tbe author of the story, John R Cor- 
nish, has treated the West from an entirely 
new angle, and the novelty of tbe treatmenet Is 
refreshingly amusing. Elmer Clifton directed 
tbe feature. 

There are few acreen actreasea who can 
equal Mies GlBh In these kind of parts and aa 
Nell she has plenty of opportunity for tbe 
pantomimic tricks by which she wins. There 
are also others In the cast who stand out, al- 
though the photoplay Itself does not maintain 
burlesque speed and spirit. It has many good 
spots, but they remain spots, separated by 
dull stretches. 

Nell Is the pepperly young keeper of a 
eating house In the mining country and she 
packs a gun, but carries a warm heart be- 
neath rough and ready clothing. She is loved 
by a real man of tbe corduroy breeches type 
— you can tell he Is a real man because he 
is a ereat rough kind of chap. But she turns 
i him down for a city chap, who has come 
< West to look after some mining property. He 
will not look at the heroine, as might b< 
expected In the "flllums," but Is struck upon 
an Ingenue who traveled on the stage coach 
with him. 

Wben Nell sees these two mushing It up 
and .later finds the city guy Is yellow and 
gun shy, she drops him and turns her vol- 
canic affections back to the real man. 

One of the feaures of the production Is the 
scenery; there are a number of wonderful 
panoramic views which start In the deepest 
woods, emerging into the sunlight and showing 
In tbe distance a valley comprising some 400 
square miles. The "location" la somewhere 
up In tbe Sierra Madret. > 

The Interiors are in keeping with the story. 
There Is always plenty of action and no end 
of gun Ore and other Western stuff. Miss 
Gist) sits and rides a horse as If she was part 
of It 

"Nugget Nell" la a good program feature 
and should be popular wltb those who never, 
weary of the "wild and whoolly Weat as It ap- 
pears In flllums." 

THE WORLD* AFLAME. 

Carson Burr Frank Keenan 

Mrs. Burr Kathleen Kerrigan 

Theodore Burr Clark Marshall 

"Roxy" Burr Janice WllBon 

Nlcolal Poppoff Bert Sprotte 

Emma Reich Claire DuBrey 

Geo. Knox Jos. McManus 

There are many faults to this picture, but 
it Is an excellent buy for exhibitors because 
It deals wltb a live situation. It le really tbe 
storv of tbe Red Bolshevist uprising put down 
in Seattle by Mayor Ole Hanson when he te- 
rmed his famous "Shoot, and shoot to kill" 
order. Everywhere Hansen's stand was ap- 
plauded, and the r ame valuable sentiment „ 



aticka out like a man's fist from "The World 
Aflame." Its six reels sre full of melodrama 
and faults abound. Frank Keenan'e acting 
Is too exaggerated, but the public wants of- 
ficials like Ole Hansen and will approve actors 
in plays like this one with an equal gusto. 

Keenan wrote the atory, and he and Jack 
Cunningham made the scenario. Ernest C. 
Warde directed. The production, an excellent 
one, was made at the Robt Brunton studios 
where tbey turn out such evenly agreeable 
photography, and Pathe baa the distribution 
In hand. 

Carson Burr, a wealthy man in a Western 
city, finds everything going to pieces In his 
household. His chauffeur prefers playing 
craps to watching hla car. His cook says that 
If the master of the houae doesn't like tbe 
cooking he can lump it, and when he gets 
fired becomes a much abused anarchist. Tbe 
chauffeur discharged. Burr has to take a 
street car. On it he meets with lack of at- 
tention and Incivility, which makes him so 
mad that he calls on tbe mayor. Finding tbe' 
mayor indisposed toward remedying public 
service conditions, Burr runs against him at 
the next election and wins. 

Almost at once he Is confronted with a 
strike. The Reds attempt to tie up the whole 
town, and Burr sets out to thwart them. Here 
tbe picturing and directing are particularly 
excellent. The mob scenes are convincing 
and that the mayor keeps things moving gives 
the average citizen a pleasant thrill. But 
this Is not all. Exhibitors need not feel that 
tbe worklngmen among their patrons are go- 
ing to he offended by this picture because the 
story goes on to show that as soon as the 
mayor baa broken the strike, chased out the 
foreign agitators and restored order, he be- 
comes the American worklngman's best friend. 
He brings employer and employed together, 
preaching the doctrine of mutual Interest now 
popular among manufacturers. 

The love story Is not particularly good and 
Janice Wilson doesn't photograph altogether 
as well aa a Keenan Ingenue might, but these 
are minor details. 

A SAGE-BRUSH HAMLET. 

This Is the usual cut and dry "Western" In 
which William Desmond lo the hero. It (a a 
Robertson-Cole release. The story* Is by Oeorge 
BIwood Jenks, and the picture was made under 
the direction of Joseph J. Franz. It takes 
about an hour to run. 

The customary shooting fracases and rough- 
rifling scenes appear plentifully, but with good 
locations always noticeable. Tbe plot divulges ' 
bow tbe hero "gets the vllllan before the latter 
'geta' him." The story has been built around 
Mr. Desmond, but is secondary to the hero's 
convlval nature and unexpected "locoed" ac- 
tions. 

It la the old atory of the son on the ranch 
who has promised to avenge the death of his 



- ■- - 



father who was killed by a Western desperado. 
Efforts have. been made to Instill a little com- 
edy into the feature supplied by Florence 
Fisher, who aa Motbor Nolan, a high-strung 
housekeeper, keeps things moving and affords 
an occasional laugh. Mobs of half-loaded 
herders also make tblngs lively. 

Tbe star has a congenial role, and makes «1 
tbe most of It. Cbancea for him to be hereto 
are forced upon him, but It must be said he ■,'■;. 

usea them gracefully. Marguerite de la Motto 
shows considerable talent In handling the role - 
of Dora Lawrence, tbe heroine, and there are *-..-■"->-• 
a number of others In the cast who have been 
carefully chosen for "type." ,. . •-?. 

"A Sage Brush Hamlet" should make a good 
program feature of the regular Western type. "*,;p 

THE UNBROKEN PROMISE. 

Nell Lorlng. Jane Miller , . "•" 

John Corliss Sidney Mason 

Billy Corliss William Human - 

*01d Man Lorlng ..John Smiley • •;* 

Sundow Slim Dlok Lb Strange ■'■'; "; 

Fadeaway Robert Tabert ■,■-'■ 

What puts "The Unbroken Promise." with 
Jane Miller In the leading role, on the ex- 
hibitors' map is tbe photography, though who 
did it and the amazingly fine laboratory work ■ ;-: 
Is kept secret by tbe Triangle-Kay Bee people, l> 

who -made this production. The story Itself f- v 

Is an ordinary Western melodrama, and none 
too convincing a one. Frank Powell, who 
directed, bundled bis players and other details ..-. 

well, and Jane Miller proved a fresh, whole- 
some heroine. The cast, too, .was equal to 
Its opportunities. The fact remains, however, 
that for the photography alone this feature la 
worth showing. It has an even tone, a blend- 
Ins of effect that is at once unusual and ' '-'.■') -«.-.■',■£ 
deserving remark. .; : '^'-'- ! : 

The scenea were shot In Texas. The story 
Is laid in tbe sheep district, where. Old Man 
Lorlng Is all bet up because Corliss and Ills 
crowd are encroaching on tbe Lorlng pre- 
serve. However, Jane, his daughter, does not ■-----*££§£ 
share the old man's antipathy. In fact, she <'■'■' r 
loves John Corliss, but his bad younger 
brother, Will, also Is. attentive to her, and she '■'; ■'.*£• 
Is sice to him because she wsata t« Influence .. . l .-.ia£: 
him to reform. He drinks not wisely, but too .--:' ■■.<■* 
much. In the and, he runs away. Coming 
back, he goes on a "bat" gats into the bad 
company of a cowboy named Fadeaway and 
tries to rob his brother's safe. Later Fade- 
away and the elder Corliss fight but John :• 
has promised Nell he wont pull a gun, so. - 

Instead, he pulls the heaviest punch ever hit 
in pictures. It Is worth seeing, that punch. ,■■-;£% 

The reasons for the climax are not ad- ~. 

quately accounted for, and some slight comedy 
was provided by Dick Le Strange. 

The title of Mitchell Lewis' forthcoming 
Select bas been changed from "La Rue of tbe 
Strong Heart" to "Faith of the Strong," 

-" ■'- -•-- ;;- ■*£$£&■* 

■ ;■•"■••... ■» ." ,' < 




American Rim Company, Inc, 

Presents 

MARGARITA 
FISHER 



mm wsr 

By JOSEPH FRANKLIN POLAND 
. Directed by GEO. L. COX • ■ 

Th« story of uio tamrwamental, lUrUUotu 
daughter of Italy— "The Tljer Uly" of Um 
cabaret — who enmeshes the good-looktn* yoani 
American In bcr web— and what caune of It. 
A supporting cast tint includes Emory John- 
son. Ueorco Perlolat, J. Harney Sherry, B. Alyn 
Warron, Beatrice Van and Frank Clark. 






. :aK$§S 






' ', .' 1 ,' J' 
?7T 







Produoed by 

AMERICAN FILM COMPANY, I no 

Samuel 8. Hutchinson. President 

Distributed by PATH* 



KBs, 






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VAUDEVILLE 
MANAGERS 
ATTENTION 



•act 



SUNSHINE 

COMEDY 

is an act of 
the greatest 

ower 





nearest FOX 
exchange for 
these theatre 
crowders 



/ 



MUTT- 

action cartoons 
take only 7 minutes 

to tVUL 

That makes them 

an ideal filler -in 

so that waits Hay 
be avoided 

7k 

CAPT3UD 

successes are the 
bigge s t laugh maters 
in the world 

^Jnd the best 
vaudeville- 
houses are 
using them ~ 



r 



FILM CORPORATION 

WILLIAM BOX 4> W-K- SHBBHAN 

president (jenftlanagcy 



FOX ENTERTAINMENTS 



-\;^.'.':--vrsi^ 



c 



••;. . 



I 



ifc'f-' 



iliflPiil 



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PLAIN WORDS 
* PLAIN MEN 



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V)" 



C yThag taken five years and six months 
L/for.the Rx Film Corporation to become 
the greatest film organna tion in the world* 
.Five years - a long time in the film in- 
dustry- but it takes time to do thing's 
.well* Its success is due to genuine show 
nunship - the giving to the public what the 
public wanted to pay to see* 

Fox Exhibitors admit that they love art 
but that they also admire the Fox, color 
scheme of a fat bankroll, and there's ibt 
of horse sense in \tbat idea 

Ihe past of the Fox Film Corporation is 

the firm inundation of a tremendously 
successful business- the present is the j>io- 
vision for theatres great and small of at- 
tractions that satisfy and make money - 
the future is a constantly rising tide of 
bij business in which the exhibitor is the 
biggest .profit maker* 

fox isn't a hifhhrow and Fox isn't a low- 
hrow-hes a showman who has made money 
for the exhibitor and money for himself* 



tOR your new season dont chase rainbows of 

4? promises- stick to the showmanship certain 

ties * Your one big problem is the question erf 

real entertainment because entertainment is 

the thing your public wants and will pay for* 

Fox pictures for the new season provide fully fcr 
great theatres and small theatres * There will be 
enough in volume, in class and above all in genuine 
human appeal* Ihe line is a complete -line.it leaves 
no theatre unprovided for, it supplies all the needs 
of the world at large WM^$if^$0^^i 

Bead the announcement plan J, policies end jp«r 
grams of all the others* Then give strict attention 
to what £o]lows on these pages <— then make 
■your own decision as a showman 

Foxtloes not critici**e anyone for' making fewer 
pictures-but he insist? upon supplying the positive 
demands, of themost active market in the history 
of motion pictures *■ and, thereiore.in the season of 
191Q-20F0X provides for all theatres, not merely 
for one class* 



\ 



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EXTRAORDINARY 
S P E GIAiS 
TonqfelLows immortal 

EVANGELINE 



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: ■ 



- 



■ mJ0 '**|y£; - 



rUmry Blossom* Q H EC KERS 
jrom the most successful [plays evevjxmed. 

flhe 1QIO ClNEMEtODHAkA 

Should a Husband Forgive 

and two to be announced - 

■ . ■ ■ .-■■ '-■.•'.■• I 

'".■"'' ..'•'■ ' ' . ,- ■ -"-••*;".'" ' '-'.'•I 



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1V1LHAM EAKKUM g 

PROftU.CTlOKS \ 

P^ABL WrilTE t 

YKQpVCTlOtJS f 

3COM MIX 

PRODUCTIONS 

TH&DA BAR A r | 

SPECIAL PROUCTIONS 






VICTORY PICTURES 

with, WILLI MP-RUSSELL, 
. GLADYS BROCKWELLrtrtrf 

GEORGE WALSH 
EXCEL PICTURES 

With PEGGY HVLANP. 

MADLAINE TIIAVERSE 

ALBERT RAY & ELINOR FAIR* 

fox Sunshine comedies 

mutt &jeff cartoons 

fox News Weekly 
A Eifxeen Episode Serial 



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FILM CORPORATION 

WILLIAM POX. to W-ft SHEEHAN 
President . (JenfManager 



FOX ENTERTAINMENTS 



••«^ i .-„v^ 






Ill M O V IN G : P I C T U R I S 



LICENSE COMMISSIONER'S RIGHTS. 

In the U. S. Circuit Court of Appeals, 
Judges Ward, Rogers and Hough, the 
former writing the opinion, denied the 
appeal of Isaac Silverman, owner of 
"Fit to Win," the Government- health 
film, from a final decree enjoining 
John F. Gilchrist, Commissioner of Li- 
censes of New Yirk, from revoking the 
license of any theatre on the ground 
that they are violating the law by ex- 
hibiting a picture unfit for public view. 

The Court held that the Commis- 
sioner has the express power to re- 
voke any license he chooses on these 
grounds and is within his rights when 
he does so. 

Griffiths & Sarfaty appeared for the 
plaintiff-appellant. 

ACCIDENT DELAYS LADY MANNERS. 

The advent of Lady Diana Manners 
in pictures has been delayed 'through 
an accident which befell the young 
beauty recently in England. She was 
to have sailed . for this country last 
week, but ten days before she fell 
from a window and sustained a bro- 
ken left. 

The First National Exhibitors were 
to have been the releasing medium of 
the productions that were planned with 
her as the star. 



NO GOOD INDEPENDENTS. 

There is a lack on the market just 
at present of independent film pro- 
ductions of a caliber to stand the test 
of the several theatre circuits. - 

Daring the convention of the First 
National Directors held in New York 
within the last ten days, there were 
daily showings of features made by 
independent producers. None meas- 
ured up to the First National standard. 

ELSIE FERGUSON GOING ABROAD. 

Elsie Ferguson is to go to England 
during October to make several pic- 
ture productions abroad. . 

Gwen Sears, of the Famous Players- 
Lasky publicity staff is to sail about 
two weeks ahead cf fkejst&r to arrange 
for her London reception. 



ETHELYN GIBSON STARRING. 

Chicago, July oO. 
Ethelyn Gibson has been signed to 
co-star with Billy West in the two- 
reel comedies being produced by the' 
Emerald Film Corporation, under di- 
rection of Frederick J. Ireland. Miss 
Gibson is known in picture circles from 
coast to coast, having worked for most 
of the large producing companies, but 
this is her advent into stardom. Wesjt 
has taken the entire troupe to a near- 
by summer resort, where work and 
vacation are being combined. 



FILM AT PRINCESS. 

Chicago, July 30. 
"Open Your Eyes," a film prepared 
under the supervision of the United 
States publicity health service, is play- 
ing at the Princess for what is an- 
nounced as an indefinite engagement, 
but will probably not last more than' 
two weeks. 



U'« Fashion Show Film. 

The educational department of Uni- 
versal, under the direction of Harry 
Levey has released a fashion show 
under the title "That Well Dressed 
Look." 

The showing of the picture will be 
augmented by a fashion exhibition of 
real live models. 



T. Hayes Hunter Contracted. 
T. Hayes Hunter has been placed 
under contract to direct the Goldwyn 
stars. He has completed "Desert Gold," 
one of the Zane Grey stories. He pre- 
viously directed "The Border Legion" 
for Goldwyn. 



Marion Davie* . Leave for Coast. 

Leaving for Los Angeles Wednesday, 
Marion Davics will remain on the 
Coast for about four weeks, to take 
scenes. 



INCORPORATIONS. 

. Serlco Producing- Corn., Manhattan, 
pictures, $16.()00; G. H. Wiley, C, .Hallen, 
E. W. Russell. 330 W. 108th street, Man- 
hattan. 

Nat Nasarro, Manhattan, theatricals, 
25,000; I. Bernstein, H. S. Hockheimer, 
N. Nazarro, 220 West 42d street, Man- 
hattan. 

Georgette Georgia Film Co„ Man- 
hattan. {50,000; J. Gilbert. T. Pinkney, H. 
Georgin, Hotel Empire, New York. 

Merrick Amusement Corp., Brooklyn, 
theatre proprietors, 15,000: M. & G. Buch- 
kofl, S. Ussach, 632 Rockaway avenue, 
Brooklyn. 



DELAWARE CHARTERS. 
AU-Amerlcnn Film Sorrlea, Inc., %Ht\- 
000: M. C. Kelly, S. L. Maokle. J. D. Frocle, 
of Wilmington. 

Exclusive Distributors' As»«, 15.00)0; 
W. R Steinlermler, W. B. Duquar, Okla- 
• horr.a City. Ok la.; Jamea M. Jeien, De- 
troit. 

Allgeod Pictures Corp.. Manhattan, 
1100, COO; W. J. Clark, LB, Nelson. C. 
Ginsberg, 675 West lC&th street, Man- 
hattan. 

Ere and the Man to produce the play 
entitled "Eve and the Man/' $12,000; T. 
R. Hansell. E. M. MacFarlane. J. "Vernon 
Pimm, of Philadelphia. 



Excksagc of Wives to produce the 
play entitled "Exchange of Wives." 112,- 
000; F. R. Hansell, B. M. MacFarlane, J. 
Vernon Pimm, of Philadelphia. *• 

Crusader Films, Inc., 1100,000; CharlM 
W. Jones, Henry R. Whlteoraft, Marian 
Monutt, Philadelphia. 



The Cinema Club has reorganised, and will 
be known as the International Society of Mo- 
tion Picture Craftsmen, Inc. The officers of 
the club are as follows: President, E. Lloyd 
Lewis; vice-president, Fred Held; treasurer. 
Larry Williams; secretary, E. Burton Btesve- 
The club has discontinued the publication of 
the Cinema News. 



aTCJ.1t3ie»SSW»; 



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Paramount 1 
ArbuckJe 

Comedie s 






''~v..>*tf 



Bring it home! 

FATTY ARBUCKLE will do 
just that for you in any 
Paramount -Arbuckle Comedy 
you choose to show. 

Every one of them a box-office 
receipt-booster of the very 

first class. 

• 

Let Fatty Arbuckle do your 
packing-them-in for you. 



; tf£R 



: FAMOUS MAYERS -LASKY CORPORATION 

*wt« SOBS SMjWSmUSTM. Wall irs IMS — 



i ^ -~*w»«w?!i«K«w«gKS^»«te*«a^ 



-sRewsTweaeKMWsr 






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MOVING PIC T U R 

RECAPITALIZING GOLDWYN FILMS; 
SHUBERT AND WOODS INTERESTED 

Framing New $20,000,000 Corporation. Lee Shubert and 

A. H. Woods Now Factors in Corporation. F. J. 

Goldsol Reported as Financial Backer. 

Deal Closed This Week. 



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Lee Shubert and A. H. Woods be- 
came active as officers and directors 
in the Goldwyn Pictures Corporation 
this week through the closing of agree- 
merits Tuesday. F. J. Goldsol, who 
cleaned up millions in war contracts, 
also became an. officer in the. corpora- 
tion and will be the Chairman of the 
Executive Committee. The Goldwyn 
Co. announces that its capitalization 
will be increased -immediately to $20,- 
000.000. 

The new officers of the corporation 
are Samuel Goldwyn, president; F. J. 
Goldsol, chairman of the executive 
committee; F. J. Goldsol, Moritz Hil- 
der, Lee Shubert, Edgar Selwyn, Abra-' 
ham Lehr, Vice presidents ; P. W. Hab- 
erman, treasurer; Gabriel Hess, secre- 
tary. The directorate of the company 
now comprises Samuel Goldwyn, F. 
J. Goldsol, Moritz Hilder, Lee Shu- 
bert, A. H. Woods, Ederar Selwyn, 
Henry Ittleson, Jacob Hilder, Har- 
mon August, P. W. Haberman and Ga- 
briel Hess. Ittleson, Augusf and Hab- 
erman are the interests in charge of 
the Commercial Investment Trust and 
also principal stockholders in the. May 
chain of department stores.- 

This deal for the swinging of new 
money into the Goldwyn company has 
been in the air for a few weeks, and 
the rumors of the entering of Shubert 
and Goldsol- into the company were 
talked of wherever film men gathered 
The only hitch, however, was the pos- 
sibility of swinging A. H. Woods into 
line. 

On his return trip from Europe 
Woods crossed on the same steamer 
with William Fox and it was under- 
stood at that time that Fox and Woods 
had entered an agreement whereby 
Fox was to guarantee Woods against 
production losses in return for the 
screen rights to all of the Woods pro- 
ductions and that Woods was to have 
shared in the orotVs from the screen 
productions. The Woods-Fox under- 
standing was reported to have stood in 
the way of the closing of the Goldwvn- 
Srmhert-Godsol deal for about ten days. 
Those close to the financial arrange- 
ments that are to he made with the 
new capitalization idea state that all 
of the outstanding indebtedness of the 
present company will be wiped out 
immediately and there will be $1,000.- 
000 m cash ready to carry on the busi- 
ness of the corporation inside of about 
three weeks. 

The Shubert-Woods-Selwyn link-up 
with Goldwyn izives that company the 
first call on all of the stage produc- 
"SJL" °i, t ". ose Producers for the screen. 
The Shubert nrevions film experience 
was with ffie World Film Corp.. which 
was handled by Lewis J. Selznick, who 
lined up the theatrical managers for 
his picture producing organization. 



- Sterling, the leading Sennett slapstick 
funsters, are to make their personal 
appearance. 

The tab is to be in three scenes, one 

including a huge glass tank for aquatic 

, exhibitions -"d another to depict a 

Coast picture studio showing a comic 

reel in the making. 

This will be the only local Moss 
house to remain open during the sum- 
mer after this week, when the Jeffer- 
son also shuts down. The Regent and 
the Hamilton are in the course of be- 
ing renovated prior to re-opening in 
the Fall with a straight picture policy 
under the Famous Players-Lasky- 
Moss regime. The Jefferson, on the 
other hand, has so built up. its vaude- 
ville patronage that it is not unlikely 
a similar policy will be retained, the 
number of acts, probably, to be cut 
down from the present seven and eight 
to four or possibly five. The Jefferson 
is to undergo extensive interior altera- 
tions. 

Sertnet may have to get along with*. 
out. any of his original bathing beau- 
ties if the ratio of desertations that 
have held since they were first shown 
on Broadway continues. The girls 
while on the coast always thought of. 
Los Angeles as somewhat of a metrop- 
olis, but after they hit the Big Town 
their visions of Vernon and all the 
other places near the film city just 
naturally faded out 

So much did they become attached 
to Broadway that when Lesser or- 
dered them to leave for Chicago last 
week, one of the girls' jumped the 
show, and' Alice Bason, the featured 
member of the dipless dippers, handed 
in her notice. After two weeks in 
Chicago she intends to see Broadway 
again and already there are a flock 
of offers for her. Another girl who 
stepped out of the show has had four 
offers from managers in New York 
With a possibility of the "Frolic" se- 
curing her services. . 

REALARrS "TALKING SIGN." 

The Realart Pictures Corp. has 
closed a contract with the O. J. Gude 
company for the talking sign atop of 
the Hotel Hermitage for the next three 
years. . 

The sign has been used by the Rice 
Leaders of the World for several years 
with a small, chariot race reproduction 
on it 



WATTERSON CLAIMS "TRIMMING." 

The suit of Guy Watterson, Chicago 
business man, to recover certain 
moneys advanced to a Los Angeles pic- 
ture director on May 2, last, will bring 
out for the first time^-if the case goes 
to trial— the kind of bunco steering 
that goes on in Movie Town, with in- 
quisitive tourists with bank rolls the 
asuaFprey. 

Watterson contends that he was in- 
veigled into a deal whereby he was 
£°ei£° v ' de mon «y necessary up to 
Sf'j J&. pro , du 5 e a # Pt«ture to be en- 
titled /The Lady of the Wistarias." 
The director he names in his suit is 
fairly well known in pictures. At the 
time negotiations began Watterson 
was among the day's sight-seeing vis- 
itors who got off the afternoon's west- 
bound trail to look California's Film- 
ville over. At dinner at the Anderson 
Hotel he met the director named, and 
after an auto ride with some of the 
directors friends, including some girls, 
Watterson agreed to supply a sum to 
the limit named for the production of 
the film play indicated, the star of 
which was to be one of the younir 
women in the little social dinner and 
auto party. Watterson claims that he 
has^smce discovered no such picture 
" 7 h f Lady of , he Wistarias" ex- 
L„S ♦!**. VL e time negotiations began, 
and that the proceeding that resolved 
in his financing the deal was conspired 
during the socials of the little oartv 
and that $15,000 he subsequently aj 

and that while the director named in 
his complaint might have gone on 
with the production the whoJe pro- 
ceeding was aimed at separating him 
trom money without any sincere in- 
tention of fulfilling the ^rU of fi ' 

agreement he thought he was mak- 
ing. . »■» 

fuSTSifV- 01 " 8 f0r Watterson have 
furnished him a comprehensive report 
of the way the "sucker money" of the 
S yMfr* ^s. way into Los An! 

EiVtfi C !3i- re ^- and th . e complainant 
USA d ' s , c,osur M will make lively 
reading for laymen and some experts. 

WHO WANTS JACK PICKFORDr 

»n?kM» have * been a serJes ofasked 
the na ?f " n . fer ' n t c « ^'nS on during 
3££5?f&L?£&! /warding the fu- 

Pickford- tried to tie-up the. boy of the 
,ff °L SI5 i er 2W« the same as 

JZSJ*?. ¥. nhti a"<» Selznick were 
i, P ™ \- I s 2 n negotiation* but there 
£*£*&*■!& 2? eoattmct will be 
definitely closed this week. 



HENRY ALVAH STRONG DEAD. 

Rochester, N. .Y, July 30. 
Henry Alvah Strong, the man who 
financed George Eastman in his early 
days, died at his home in this city 
early Saturday morning. At the time 
of his death he was vice-president of 
the Eastman Kodak Co., of New Jersey, 
the parent company, and president of 
: the Eastman Kodak Company of New 
York. •:••':-■.■-'" "' -----^ 

Mr. Strong was a native of Roches- 
ter and during the civil war served as 
an assistant paymaster in the navy. 
After the war he. went into the whip 
manufacturing business with his uncle. 
Several years later he became inter- 
ested in the young man who was des- 
tined to startle the world with his 
photographic inventions. In 1880 he 
formed a partnership with George 
Eastman and in 1889 he sold out his 
whip business to devote alt of his time 
and money to the new field, 

In 1889 the Eastman Dry Plate Co. 
was formed, with Mr. Strong as presi-^ 
dent, and majority stockholder, and 
Mr. Eastman as treasurer. While Mr; 
Eastman furnished the inventive gen* 
ius, Mr. Strong supplied the capital 
necessary to place the Eastman In- 

nf^K on - ft? pa^et- , tmmm 

of $10,000 which he invested in thebusi- 
S2L h a» now^grown t o so many mil- 
lions that it is hard to count them; v 

In later years losses on Western 
investments compelled Mr. Strong to 
dispose of some of his stock in the 
company and it is understood that 
at this time Mr. Eastman secured con- 
trol of the company. When the East- 
man Kodak Company of New Tersev 
was formed in 1901, Mr. Strong be- 
came vice-president "and continued as ■ 

£!" de « nt M of th ,f Eastman Kodak Com- ' 
pany of New York. . 

Long noted for his charitable imV 
pulses, Mr. Strong gave freely to the 

V T°, U8 /? ause8 }n wn{c h he was inter- 
ested. Of an amiable disposition, it is : 3 

L**? !t at «L ever !n hi» long career 
has anything been said that would cast \ 
a reflection on his good name. He was 
or a modest and retiring disposition 
and was rarely in the public eye SS' 

nlereft K S& ^P* and sh ™ W 
n . ., a ♦ **V n ? 9 that appealed to him ■/ 
m a substantial manner. "^ ■;:; 




Ms.* 



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GINSBERG'S BARROOM FILM. 



"BATHING BEAUTIES" AT B»WAY. 

The Broadway theatre will retain its 
picture policy until the end of Sep- 
tember, at least, according to the 
report that Mack Sennett is busy 
producing a new five-reel comic which 
is to be housed at the Broadway Sept 
1, where the Mack Sennett "Bathing 
Beauties of 1920," a half hour tabloid 
to be composed by Stanley W. Lawton, 
B. S. Moss' musical director, will also 
be produced in conjunction with the 
comedy. In it, Ben Turpln, Charles 
Murray, Chester Cbnklin and Ford 



PLAYHOUSE, CHI„ FOR PICTURES. 

. Chicago, July 30. 
The Playhouse, for several years 
used as a dramatic comedy theatre, 
film shop and recital hall, has been 
leased for five years to the United 
Photoplays Company at aa annual 
rental of $22,000. 
v _ The picture people take possession 
Sept 1, with a Pickford picture. 

Maddock «nd Hart Company. 
VT Charles B. Maldock, Max Hart and 
Nefhe Fallon are the directors of a new 
$20^)00 capitalized corporation, organ- 
ized to produce theatrical and motion 
picture attractions. 

It is to be called the Maddock Enter- 
prises, Inc. 



"MIRACLE ^ MAN" QUOTA 11,000,000. 

The Famous Players-Lasky Co. have 
Placed an earning capacity of $1,000,- 
??L 0n , their I P r ? dtt . c t' , on. "The Miracle 
Man. for the United States. 

This means that New York State will 
have to return $140,000 on the picture. 

... V^" Martin Quits F. P.-L. 

Viyian Martin, who has been starring 
for the Famous Players-Lasky Com- 
pany, has decided not to continue with 
the organization in the future. She 
ha^ come to New York and will re- 
main here until she makes other 
arrangements for her picture appear- 
ances in the future. Her reason for 
u J.enewing her contract was that 
she did not wish to continue to make 
ten or more pictures a year. 



rtrni....!. r- u ^MfO, July 30. '■. 

Benjamin Ginsberg, eastern film 
man, has acquired states right interest 
to a promising freak picture. It is 
an old version of "Ten Niirhts in 1 
Barroom," which had been S aJide 
as deceased. The advent of prohibi- 

„ , a °,\I« Urr n C - ted . ^5 fi, J°- Ginsberg 
has beeivselling it in and around Chi- 
cago. Tfie paper that goes with, the 
Picture is -the -old-time "lurid stuff in 

rJjhS? SSd? 8rt<!ntered thC mh0 ^ 



Allen's Building In Montreal. 

ti,- ah r * M »ntreal, July 30. 

.The Aliens of Toronto will build a 
S. e - •. re ■ Futures, to seat 2.500. 

.JtarfSm^l the corner of Cathcart 
and McGill College avenue. 



,p ™™2MF1BS®& VAWECT - 




E. F. Albee Building in Montreal. 

ac, .. Montreal. July 30. 

A film exchange building of ten 
Stories is b*ing trtettd here by E. F. 



Griffith to Revive "Nation." 
Following the expiration of "The 
Fall of Babylon's" three weeks' run 
at the Geo. M. Cohan Theatre Aug. 16, 
D. W Griffith will revive "The Birth 
of a Nation" for the final week of his 
metropolitan repertory season. 

Griffith leaves the Cohan Aug. 23, a 
K * E attraction coming In Aug. 1A. 



Jack 
Cunningham 

Free Lancing: 
Again „ 

Hollywood, Cal. 

Pleatt s r».m— m* yj.u 04 Mar 






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MOVING PICTURE DEPARTMENT PAGES 51 TO 58 



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,000,000 BUY IN STANLEY CO. 
BY ZUKOR MAKES NEW RECORD 



Largest Deal So Far in Race For Picture Theatres. Philadelphia 

Concern Controls Many Houses in Pennsylvania. 

Paramount President May Affiliate New 

Concern With His Production 

Organization. 



I 



Philadelphia, July 30. 

Adolph Zulcor, president of the Fam- 
ous Players-Lanky Corporation, has 
purchased stock in the Stanley Co. and 
has been elected a member of the 
board of directors. The Stanley Co. 
recently incorporated for $15,000,000, 
taking in all the interests which con- 
trol th*e Market Street Co., Sablosky 
& McGuirk, Al. Bovd and other pic- 
ture, and pop vaudeville theatres in 
this city, Reading; Norristown and 
other nearby cities, makes this a record 
buy. . 

It was not learned in what capacity 
Mr. Zukor will be connected with the 
firm, bui the company has planned ex- 
tensive operations in the, building of 
new theatres and the purchase and 
leasing of houses wherever there is a 
demand for photoplay entertainment. 
It is not believed the affiliation of Zii- 
kor with the Stanley Co, will in any. 
way effect his connection with the 
Famous Players-Lasky organization, 
but there will probably be some sort of 
a working agreement arranged later. 

DuritiBt the past week the Stanley 
Co. added to its list of houses the 
Nixon Colonial in Germantown and the 
house will begin its new season August 
25 with Fred Leopold, formerly man- 
ager of the Nixon, as manager.* Mr. 
Leopold recently returned from France, 
where he spent more than a year in 
the service of the Y. M. C. A. The 
Colonial has been playing nop vaude- 
ville and films underWhe direction of 

F. G. Nixon -Nidlinger, but it will prob- 
ablv play only feature films now. 

The taking over of the Colonial by 
the Stanley Co., however, opens the 
way for more harmonious dealings all 
round and it will not be anv surprise 
if the Colonial deal should, lead* to 
others and other houses in which F. 

G. Ntxon-Nirdlinger is principally in- 
terested, both in this and other cities, 
will be taken into the Stanley Co. 



I, MARY MACLANE, PINCHED. 

Chicago, July 30. 

Mary Maclane, heroine of the fren- 
zied film "Men Who Have Made Love 
to Me," and of the sensational book 
"I, Mary Maclane," was arrested at 
her home here this week on a charge 
of larceny by bailee. 

It se«ras that Alia Ripley, the mo- 



diste, had furnis'ied certain gowns for 
Mary when she was putting the pic- 
ture on, which were neither returned 
nor paid for, the complainant alleged. 
Having pnly 85 cents to her name, I, 
Mary, was pinched. 



CAPITOL OPENS SEPTEMBER 1. 

"The Girl from Outside," a Goldwyn 
picture, based on a story by Rex Beach, 
has been booked for the Capitol The- 
atre by Manager E. J. Bowes. As the 
picture is set for release Sept. 1 the 
chances are that "the largest theatre 
in the world"- will open its doors about 
then. 

Though Messmore Kendall, owner of 
the 'playhouse, has made no definite 
announcement, he has given friends to 
understand his palatial private apart- 
ments in the theatre^ building will wel- 
come a house-warming party at about 
that time. ••"'. 



GOLDWYN'S TITLE JURY. 

Samuel Goldwyn has decided to bring 
every different type of mind in his 
employ together on a "title jury," the • 
duty of which will be to improve Gold- 
wyn titles. 

According to magazine men this sys- 
tem has been tried and found want- 
ing. "Everything that goes into the 
Saturday Evening Post." George 
Horace Lorimer, its editor, has 
declared. "I pick personally." "Let me 
handle the Atlantic Monthly and print 
only what I like," said Ellery Sedgwick. 
Since then the Monthly has been a 
success. 



CHANGES NAME THIRD TIME. 

Greta Hartman. known on the screen, 
is also Sonia Markova, equally the 
favorite of film fans. Born a Swede, 
her real name is Greta Hartman. 
Shortly after goiner on the stage she 
adopted the name Gretchen. When we 
went to war with Germany the adopted 
name proved ' a handicap, and she 
dropped it. 

An enterprising producer got her to 
call herself Sonia Markova. and she 
was billed as a Russian. Then came 
the Bolshevist uprising and that name 
proved bad business, so she has re- 
turned to the cogaomen her parents 
gavt har. 



BRENON BACK WITH SELZNICK. 

Herbert Brenon is to produce for 
Lewis J. Selznick again. A deal was 
closed last week whereby the future 
productions of the producer, who is 
now abroad, are to be made for the 
Selznick organization. The latest ad- 
vices from abroad on Herbert Brenon 
are to the effect that he has severed 
his connection with the B. & C. Film 
Corporation of London and has gone 
to Italy. x 

Chandos Brenon, brother of Her- 
bert, who is in this country, broached 
the subject of an affiliation with the 
Selznick interests and Selznick was 
most cordially willing to have Brenon 
with him. 

The trouble, however, is that Chan- 
dos cannot reach Herbert via cable 
to apprise him of the fact 



FEAR' ENGLISH CENSORSHIP. 

The Famous Players-Lasky people 
fear that the agitation against their 
invasion of England may react on 
them through the placing of drastic 
censorship on all American made films. 
They are lining up foreign connections 
to combat this in every way possible. 

Englishmen who have been in pic- 
tures in this country, who had any 
standing abroad prior to their advent 
here are being lined tip to return to 
England to work in the interests of 
the new producing corporation. 



ORDERS FIFTY HOUSES CLOSED. 

Chicago, Juiy 30. 
Deputy City Collector Lohman has 
requested Chief of Police Garrity to 
close 50 picture theatres and small 
vaudeville houses for failure to renew 
their licenses. 

. "If the owners renew their permits 
within the next few days no action will 
be taken," Lohman said. Fees aver- 
age $200 a year. 



PECULIARLY STARTED FIRE. 

Boston, July 30. 

A damage of $6,000 was caused by a 
fire which started in the "rewind" 
room of the Eastern Feature Film Co., 
in Church street in this city. The rays 
of the sun, shining through a plate 
glass window and focussing on a roll 
o"f film is supposed to have started the 
blaze. 

Several women employes of the firm 
were obliged to beat a hasty retreat 
when the fire started. For a few min- 
utes the blaze attained threatening 
proportions and as this' firm is lo- 
catedin the heart of the film concerns 
in this city serious results were pos- 
sible. 



No Pittsburgh Branch for Censors. 

Harrisburg, Pa., July 30. 
Governor Sprout has vetoed the 
House bill which would have provided 
for a Pittsburgh branch office of the 
Pennsylvania Board of Censors «f 
Moving Pictures. 



THEDA BARA AND FOX PART. 

Despite denials on the part of both 
employer and employed it is now 
known definitely that Theda Bara and 
the Fox FflhTCorporation" have parted ~". 
qompany. The difference of .opinion 
culminated in a row over salary, and 

since she became foot-loose the famous 
vampire has been dickering with Para- 
mount. ./ 
Miss Bara wants a salary of $5,000 a' 
week. She has been receiving $4,600 a 
week from Fox, but that organization 
refused to renew its contract at that 
price— One far in excess of what they 
were accustomed to paying Miss Bara 
over a term of years. The way she 
got it accounts for. the break between 
her and her managers. 

' In the middle of her last feature, 
according to those in touch with affairs 
at the Fox office, Miss Bara suddenly 
quit work*' and refused to continue 
unless she got $4,000 a week. She had 
been getting $1,500, which seemed to 
the Fox people fair enough ; but under 
the' circumstances they had no choice. 

Those close to the star say that she 
may organize her own company." She 
frequently complained because Fox 
gave her only "vamp" parts. 



"OPEN YOUR EYES" BARRED. 

Providence, R. I., July 30. 

The feature film, "Open Your Eyes," 
has been barred from showing in 
Providence theatres by Sergt. Richard 
H. Gamble, amusement censor of the 
Providence Police Department and his 
decision has been upheld by the police 
commission. The State Board 'of 
Health has also put its mark of dis- 
approval upon the film. 

Several attempts have been made to 
show the picture to mixed audiences 
here, and last week Dr. Jewett, of the 
Health Film Company, called on the 
police commissioners after having 
been turned dpwn by Amusement Cen- 
sor Gamble. The commission in- 
formed him that it supported Mr. Gam- 
ble in refusing him permission to pro- 
ject the film here. 



"MIRACLE MAN" ON BROADWAY. 

The Famous Players-Lasky produc- 
tion in eight reels of 'The Miracle 
Man" will have its first public showing 
in a. Broadway theatre. Just what one 
is not known. The first report the 
picture would open at a $2 scale ap- 
pears to be in errdr. F. P.-L. "has not 
as yet decided upon that other than 
that the top admission will not go to $2. 

Some comment has been caused 
through the report the eight-reeler 
will be distributed and exhibited on 
the percentage plan, much along the 
same system as stage road attractions 
plav. 

There is no star featured in the film. 
George Loane Tucker directed the pic- 
ture. It is a dramatization of the play 
of a fewjjeasons ago, written by 
George M. Cohan. 



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hings worth while having 

Phil Baker's fortune.; '.'■ 
Mil ton Marx's Patent. 
Billy GleaBon's route. 
Frank Joyce's baby boy. 
Larry RelUy's disposition. 
A nice, cool room and bath 

■• et the 

HOTEL JOYCE 

l Wert 7I»t Bt., Centre! Park West, N. T. 




The Bill 

Was "laid out* Wrong 

The Whistling Chiropodist 

never should have, 

"Opened the Show 1 ' 

He should have Been ■ 

at the .. 

Foot of The Bill 

GILLEN-CARLTON AND CO. 
.!• Time Direction, MARK LBVY 



FRED DUPREZ 




Starring. In "Mr. 
- Manhattan" In 
. England. 
N*W York Bepr.t 

SAM. BAERWTTZ 
MM Broad wv 
London B«pr. I 

MURRAY & DAW 
8. Lists St, W.C. i 




MAfllE , 

C L A R K E 

..:..... and EARL 

LA VERE'S 

FRIEND MAGGIE 8EZ: 

r» write* from Chamber Junc- 
tion that atn.be the country went 
dry, you'd bo turprUed how 
many ottjr fellere* autamoM la i 
break down in front of hie elder 
barrel. Ihera ibwtii to be a 
kick connected with It— eepediJUy 
b? our most prominent Prohi- 
bltlonlst, who has but fifty sal- 
lona left in hie cellar. 

'Ton know how it u with w«. 

Tlmmls." 
"Hello, fauikr" (KmmaO'NelJ). 




ESTELLE 
RAMSEY 

Exclusive Songs 

and 

Pianologue 

Booked Solid 

W. V. M. A. and A.-II. 



BROWN'S DOGS 

A nifty acrobstle dog act, classy and 
the only act of its kind. 

Now playing on Loew Time , 



8 to 16 
Weeks finn. 



CONTRACTS FOR Nothing too 
FRANCE big!!! 



APPLY TO 



HUGHES RYNER 



Exclusive Booking Manager for 

CH. DEBRAY'S HALLS 

NOUVEAU CIRQUE, PARIS 



1 1525 North Maplewood Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 

, . 'July 26,1919 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

1 have had in preparation for the last six months an Animal 
Novelty, in which I propose using a "One Man Band." 

In accordance, I purchased from Signor Nicolo Cordana his ORIGINAL 
ONE MAN BAND APPARATUS, which be ORIGINATED AND USED in 
the Museum and Variety Theatres thirty-four years ago, with my Father, 
the late Glacomo Galetti, of "Galetti's Monkeys" fame. 

I see -in your issue of Variety of July 26th, that Mr. Henry Rigoletto 
claims to be the originator of the "One Man Band" idea, 

I WISH TO REFUTE THAT STATEMENT 

Fred G. Galetti 



HOME 

for a real vacation 
with our two kiddies 

JIM and MARIAN 

HARKINS 

Dir., NORMAN JEFFERIES 



My Kid Brother 
looks like 



Tab Straight Man 

He Wears- Hi-t Hat Down' 

Where the Agents 
Try to Poll the Wool Over 

"Novelty Acts" 

COOK AND OATMAN 

Loew Circuit Direction, MARK LEVY 



HUNTER, CHICK 
and HUNTER 

II HinntM of Fan end Harmony 
Direction, LEW GOLDER 



Mile. Lingarde 

EUROPEAN POSEUSE 
PLASTIQUE NOVELTY 

Direction FETE MACK ' 



EL 



FLO 



BRENDELandBERT 

IN THEIR OWN ACT , 

"Waiting for Her" 



OSWALD 




Care of : •• 

Rawson 

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and Clare- 



Auburndale, 
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L1TTXK JBRRY am Jt yoa all knew 
met 
| an vaudeville's "Mite ef Mirth." 

Three feet tall, I am etasar and nesti ' 

Thonah the else of a kW, bsto a teles 

■ yon cant beat. ' 

■ ota of ways there are to reach fan*— 

E"ntertelnln« ii my middle name. 

Juatly feat a red wherertr I play, ; 

Eyery where from the Coait to Broad- 
way. . "... ~:,.- ; 
Becoflalaad artist, no streager to fame. 

Really, why aikT yea all knew nay 

re trah 
JBBaV 



YOOra truly, a "Mlt. of Mirth." LITTL* 
JEBET. 



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IRVING M. COOPER 

ABTIBTB" BBPBZSBNTATIVB 

1416 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

JOE COOPER, Gen. Mgr. . Pbenei Bryant \\\\\ 






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CORRESPONDENTS WANTED 

VARIETY wants correspondents, newspaper men preferred 
Address VARIETY. New York 



MERCEDES WANTS 

following acts and people for his big show opening on or about 
September 1st Can give good acts forty weeks' work. Book direct 
with me and save agents' commission. I pay all transportation and 
baggage after joining. ' .iow plays Klaw & Erlanger time exclu- 
sively. Full week 8i. ..,.,,. Write or wire. State full particulars. 
Send photos. Will return same. 

Comedy Novelty Acts; Jap Troupe; Manikin Act; Comedy Magic; 
Union Stage Carpenter; Property Man; Electrician; Orchestra 
Leader; Band Men (non union); Ventriloquist; Mind Reader (one 
that does not use telephone); Girl Vio'intet, and Turkish Dancer. 
Address 

TVn?'RoP171 r ll7 l C 727 IR VING PARK BLVD. ., 

1t11jjJ\\^JuJ_JJj,io Chicago, ill. 

COUNT CHILO WIRE ME 



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Announce the Opening of Their 









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LOOP END BUILDING 

177 No. State Street, Opposite State-Lake Theatre 

■/"•'•■•. .'■■;•.:.■••■'. SUTTE'205 ..-■••/• ;-..- ;\-r. ■::•,. ^ ,::,.; . . 

OTTO SHATTER, Mgr. 

ACTC DESIROUS OF EASTERN OR WESTERN BOOKING 

CCMMUNIC^ 

New York Office, 1493 Broadway, Putnam Building, Times Square 



Cable Address "Arty" 



Phone Bryant 657-658 



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(BERT and HARRY GORDON) 

W. V. M. A., R F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

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Booked Solid. Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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W. V. M. A.— B. F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 



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BERT DELL MABELLE FONDA JOE BEATTIE 



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VERSUS "GRAVITATION* 



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AN ILLUMINATED NOVELTY FOR THE MIDDLE WEST 

BOOKED SOLID— UNTIL JUNE, 1920 

W. V. M. A, B. P. KEITH <W«tora) aad Affiliated ClrcriU «J 



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The Temple of Minstrelsy 






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Offering 

'MINSTRELS A LA CARTE" 

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Featuring 

HAWTHORNE, AMY ARDEL, ULIS BROS, and JESTER 

ALL REAL PERFORMERS 

. .' . • - - A / • : • . •• • 

- Booked Solid— Season 1919-1920. 

Direction, LEW CANTOR 
W.'V. M. X-B. P. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 









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THE BIGGEST ATTRACTION IN THE WORLD 



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HIS FAMOUS MANAGER 
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VAUDEVILLE SHOW 



A FEW DATES LEFT 



WRITE OR WIRE 



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Linick — Jacoby — Lichtenstein 



110 South State Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



PHONE: CENTRAL 3575 



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? Vbl.LV, No. 11 



NEW YORK CITY, AUGUST 8, 1919 



MM, al <b» Part Otfiw at ><•«• York. 
H. t.. vUm Midrf Men* 3. W» 



PICTURE PERCENTAGE PLAN 
MAY PLEASE LEGITIM ATE HOUSES 

Scheme to Present Feature Films by Famous Players-Lasky 

Not Restricted to Picture Theatres Only. Picture People - 

Take First Money Under Guarantee, With 

House Taking Out Expenses Second, Then 

Split Remainder of Gross. Moore 

of Washington Accepts Plan 

.' For Regular Film Playing. 



V 



The percentage plan of playing pic- 
tares, announced by Famous Players- 
Lasky and now being worked out in 
detail in its offices, may appeal to le- 
gitimate theatre managers. The pic- 
ture people have not restricted the 
scheme to picture houses'only, except- 
ing' that the exhibitors they supply 
with regular weekly features will have 
the preference. • 

The plan, in brief, is to place a spe- 
cial film subject at the theatre on the 
percentage system, with the manager 
guaranteeing a certain amount that 
does not alarm him through fear of a 
loss. The F. P.-L, takes the first 
money to cover the guarantee, with 
the house manager taking the next 
moneys at the box Office until he shall 
have received all of his operating ex- 

5enses. After that the remainder is 
ivided as the profit between the two. 
Under the percentage plan a feature 
is not limited in its stay and may en- 
dure as long as the box office says it 
is advisable. It is unlikely regular "pic- 
ture exhibitors will alter the policy 
of their theatre for the percentage 

.plan, and it is not always - anticipated 
that the exhibitor wilf want the spe- 
cial film provided for the percentage. 
There are to be twelve of these made 

.by the Famous within the year. Ex- 
hibitors taking first run service from 
the Famous are aware of this and that 
the dozen specials under the percent- 
age plan are exempt from their house 
and service. A legit theatre in the 
same city of larger capacity and a 
higher admission scale is eligible to 
take on the special percentage^fea- 
ture. In. the past such feature"films 
called for a daily or weekly rental that 
tied up the exhibitor or manager for 
a- cejtain amount regardless. The 
guarantees will be based -uLcn ca- 
pacity. "•- 

The first special release selected for 
Jne percentage plan by the Famous is 
"he Miracle Man," in eight reels. 
Another and unlooked-for angle to 



the percentage system came, up . this 
week when F. P.-L. reached an agree- 
ment with Tom- Moore of Washington 
to include two of the Moore houses 
under the system in the regular wajLof 
film releases. The two Moore theatres 
are the Garden and Park. They will 
open around the new season, but will 
not become part of the F. P.-L.'s per- 
sonally directed theatre organization 
of which B. S. Moss, is the head. The 
Moore houses will be operated by Mr. 
Moore and he will have the choice of 
40,weekly releases of the Famous. The 
weekf remaining open during the sea- 
son may be filled in by Mr. Moore 
from^my other films than F. P.-L. that 
he settles upon. . It gives the Wash- 
ington manager an opportunity to se- 
cure a direct line upon the pulling 
qualities of his choices, since neither 
one of the two houses has been a win- 
ner under previous picture policies. 

Moore, however, will not have the 
first run right to F. P. L. releases in 
Washington. That is held by Marcus 
Loew at Loew's Columbia for down- 
town there. It is one of the two cities 
thus far Loew has contracted for with 
the Famous. The other is Cleveland. 

The Moore-Famous percentage, ar- 
rangement is on the same terms as for 
the special releases/ with a 50-50 divi- 
sion of all monies over the first and 
second. ^ 

It is believed to be the first time a 
picture exhibitor has entered into an 
agreement of this kind with a distrib- 
utor to play percentage under weekly 
releases (no specials) continuously. 



WATER TRAVELING CARNIVAL. 

-. A carnival to tour South American 
countries, transported on a steamer of 
sufficient size, is the plan or scheme 
of Freeman Bernstejfc.- Mr. Bernstein 
has asked 20 concession men familiar 

.with carnivals to subscribe as a pre- 
liminary advance $2,000 .each to pro- 
cure the boat He expects that the 
.rental of fjie steamer' will be about 
$10,000 monthly. ■'..'•■ 

Due to the present condition of 
water transportation Bernstein is of 
the opinion the only certain way to 
move about is by a personally oper- 
ated steamship. If the venture gets 
under way and the going looks all 
right to Bernstein, on land as well as 
on water, the gamble will be propelled 
into ail of the South American coun- 
tries reported having any money. 

REGULATING QOSTUMES. 

There is an ordinance in Shelby, 
N. G, regarding shows. It reads as 
follows: i 

"Ordinance: Vaudevilles, Tabs,' 
shows and .all shows featuring and dis- 
playing extreme costumes of chorus 
and actresses. ° . v 

"Section (a). That it shall be unlaw- 
ful for any -vaudeville show, tab show, 
or other show whose chorus girls, act- 
ress or actresses wear such extreme 
costumes as would elicit unfavorable 
comment upon other occasions, etc., 
show performers or give exhibitions 
I within the town of Shelby, N..G, that 
all such shows are hereby forbidden 
in said town of Shelby, N. C." 

SUBURBAN BOARDS TIED UP. 

The billboards in the suburbs of New 
York are contracted for in full up to 
Dec. 1, next, at the earliest. Most of 
the space has been taken for com- 
mercial billing. What little remains 
for theatricals has already been con- 
tracted for by the Shuberts, Ai H. 
Woods and Klaw & Erlanger. Neither 
has any Joo much. 

The condition leaves the independent 
producer who wants to notify the rural 
residents of his production on Broad- 
way no place to tell excepting through 
paper advertising. 



PRESIDENT'S WEEKLY HABIT. 

Washington, ~Aug. 6. 

The President and Mrs. Wilson are 
again returning to their habit of at- 
tending Keith's (vaudeville) each week. 
Accompanied by a large party, they 
vvfire there last night as well as last 
week. 

The President, received a hearty re- 
ception upon 'his entrance to the box. 



CHAMPION MATINEE FANS. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 6. 

Syracuse claims the world's cHampion 
"matinee fans" in Mrs. Alonzo Whit- 
more and her sister, Mrs. Frank 
Wedge. Thirty-three years without 
missing a matinee in local houses, is 
the record of the Syracuse women. 

Commenting on theatricals, past and 
present, the sisters assert that the 
present day stage folks do not take 
their profession quite as seriously as 
the old timers. 



\. 



TREASURY DEPT. SPONSORSHIP 7: 

Washington, Aug, 6V. .,_ C 

Under the auspices of the Treasury ' . 
Department, the. Home Club Player*- 
are to present a thrift play entitle^- 
"Stamps To , Keep," Friday (tonight) £» 
in the auditorium of the Interior De* ;:; 
partment building. "- : '■'•■ : ' / ~p~}^f£?. 

The production is being directed by 
Guy W. Harper, for many years a proV ■ 
fessional and now in the Treasury. The 
cast includes a number of local am- 
ateurs who Jiaye done*, considerable . j, 
work-in and about Washington, par*''-^ 
ticularly in the army camps. . ' ' 

The War Camp Community Service 
is encouraging the writing of one act 
playlets by local writers by the open- ••",': 4 
ing of a contest confined to local 
scribes and offering substantial prises. .. 

Maud Howell Smith, director of the 
dramatic department, stated 'that^ther-^ 
manuscripts would remain .the prop- \ 
erty of the writer and that the first 
performance would be the only stip- . ' % 
ulation agreed to by the writers. They , 
will -be, presented this winter in the > 
■army corps and local theatres. 






: THEATRICAL ELECTION. 

.All signs point to the presidential 
election of November, 15>20, being a 
theatrical one tova very large extents 
The campaigning will be done by all 
parties with a liberal employment of 
Jhe moving picture,, while the latest 
device to create further interest are 
phonograph records, carrying speeches 
of well known Americans. > 

Among the first records to be sent 
out, and they may commence to spread 
about, before. New Year's, are those 
already made by U. S. Attorney Gen- 
eral Mitchell A. Palmer, answering a 
similar style of talk made by Senator 
Henry Cabot Lodge. ..','. y'-.U-. 

FAVORS PLAY FOR TWO. ^ 

A. H. Woods has bought, but is hesi- 
tating about producing, a new drama 
that has impressed him more than any 
other piece of dramatic literature be 
has had anything to do with in some 
time.- . - 

"It has but two 'characters and one 
set. There is at present some diffi- 
culty about casting it. 

GLASSWARE HERE FOR LONDON* 

The new dance club in London, pro- 
moted by Grahame White (husband of 
Ethel Levey) has bought its bar glass- 
ware in New York. An order filled by 
Ovington's included many cocktail 
glasses and shakers. . 

The glassware may be taken across, 
by Clark's Hawaiians, 10 of 'em, who 
are leaving tomorrow (Saturday) on 
the Haverford from Philadelphia, to 
become, the musical combination for 
the London dancing plf„c 






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Direction, LEW CANTOR 







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CHIC and TINY HARVEY 



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"IN A SURPRISE" 

OUR SURPRISE IS MISS LIDA GARDNER-68 YEARS OLD 
THE OLDEST SINGING AND DANCING COMEDIENNE IN VAUDEVILLE 
SOME PUNCH SOME TALK SOME NOVELTY ' 

W. Y. M. A.— B. F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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JUST FINISHED FO RTY CONSECUTIVE WEEKS 

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W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

Direction, LEW CANTOR \ 



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NANA SULU VAN & CO. 

IN A COMEDY SKETCH 

"NEVER AGAIN" 

W. V. M. A.— B. F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuito 

Direction LEW CANTOR 



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MILADY RAFFLES" 


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Sept. 1— Evamvilte Oct. 6— Granite City 

■ 4— Terre Haute " »— Kedrte, Chicago 
" 8 — Champaign . " IS— Grind, Chicago 
" 11— Decatur " 16— DaTenport 

" 14— Springfield ■ 1»— Holine 

" 18— But St, Louie " «*— Cedar Rapldi 

- 22— Belleville " 24— Dubeque 

■ 25— Alton ■ M— MonxCHy 

■ 29— Grand, St. Lonli 

LEW CANTOR DID FT 


j Not. 2— Omaha Dee. 4— Green Bay 

" ft— Lincoln - . * g— Badne 

* f— Dee Btolnes m 11— Kenoiha 

" IS— Minneapolis /" 14— American, Chicago 

" 18— Dalnth ■' - 15— Hippodrome, Chicago 

- 20-8nperfor .*■ '■ 25-8ontR Bend 

■ 2S-8tPaul .. - 28— Gary 

■ 27— Rockford 
H 30— Madison 

W* V. M. A. B. F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 



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17— Ten e Haute . 
21— Decatur 

24-Sprlngfleld 
28— East St. Lonli 
1-Rlalto, St. Lonla 
4— Colombia, St. Lonla 



Sept. 8— Belleville 
■«• 11— Champaign 
■ 14— Peoria 
" 18— DaTenport 
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ROUTED 

Sept. 28 — D ubuque 
Oct. 2— Minneapolis 

••' 5— D ninth 
" 9 — Superior 
" 12— St Panl 
" 16— GreetfSay 

20— Milwaukee 




Oct. 27— Racine 
*~ * 30 — Kenoiha 

Nor. 2— Bockford 
« fr-Madlion 
" 8— American 
".. 10— Kedile 



Not. IS— South Bond 

• 16— Gary 

" 17— Hippodrome, Chicago 

M 24-^Grand, St. Lonla 
Dec 1— Granite City 

" 4— Alton . 



W.V.M.A. B. F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuits • 



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Aug. 24— Fort Wayne 
28— South Bend 



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" 31— African, Chicago 
Sept 1— Belleville 

4— Colu'bia, St Louis 
8 — Champaign 

*■ 11— Peoria 

" 14 — Davenport 

" • 18— Moline 

" 21— Dubuque 

" 25— Cedar Rapids 

" 28— Des Moines 



Oct 2 — Lincoln 
" 5— Omaha 
9— Sioux City 
12— Minneapolis 
.". 16-StPaul 
* 19— Duluth 
23— Superior 
26— La Crosse 
27— Racine 
30— Rockford 
Nov. 2— Madison 
6— Green Bay 



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Nov. 10— Kedzie, Chicago 
" 13— Decatur 
" 16— Springfield 1 
" 20— East St Louis 
" 24— Grand, St Louis 

Dec. 1 — Alton 
" 4— Rialto, St Louis 
r 8— Granite City 
" 11— Bloomington 
"■■ 14— JoUet 
" 15— Hipp., Chicago 
"22— Terre Haute 



Dec. 

Jan. 

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Feb. 

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25— Evansville 

4 — Indianapolis . " 
12— Richmond 
15— Lima 
19— Springfield 
22— Marion 
26— Columbus 

2— Charleston 

5— Huntington 

9— Wheeling 
12— Steubenville 
16— Cleveland 
23— Buffalo 






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ALL STAR ROAD SHOW 



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option, LEW CANTOR 



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"IN ODD NONSENSE" 

By. J. P. MEDBURY 

W. V. M. A.,B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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Just completed Tour over W. V. M. A., B. F.Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

E. HOLDER, Manager Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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NEW CLOTHES. 



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Booked Solid— W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits | 

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Aug. 11— Springfield 
" 14— E.St Louis 
" 18— Rialto,StLoul8 

" 21— Colu'bia,StLouis 
" 25— Hipp., Chicago 
Sept 1— Kedzie, Chicago 
:?. M 4 — Racine : 
" 8— Minneapolis 
" 11— Dulutii 
" 15— Superior 



and CO. 

Sept 18— St Paul 

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29— Omaha 



Oct 24— South Bend 
" l 28— A'erican, Chicago 



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" 5— Cedar Rapids 



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'■*"■ 9 — Davenport 
& - 13— Dubuque 

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-I" 18— Champaign 

" 13— Peoria 

" 17— Decatur 

." 20— Lincoln, Chicago 

<< 23— Madison 






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LUIGI PICARO 

MANAGER 






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Sept 

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Oct 

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15— Alton 

18— Columbia* St Louis 
22— Rialto, St Louis 
25— Springfield 
28— JDecatur 

2— Champaign 

5 — Peoria 

9 — Blomington 
12-^Joliet 
13— Galesburg 
16 — Davenport . 
19— Cedar Rapids 



Oct 13— Des Moines 

" 26— Omaha 
"•* 30— Lincoln 
Nov. 2— Sioux City 
5— Minneapolis 
9— Dulnth 
13 — Superior 
" 16-StPaul 
" 23— Dubuque 
m 27— Moline 
" 30— Rockford 






Dec. 3— Green Bay 
8— Milwaukee 
15 — Racine 
18— Madison 
21 — American 
22— Kedzie 
25— South Bend 
28— Lincoln 
Jan. 1— East St Louis 
" 5— Grand, St Louis 
" 12— Evansville 



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Jan. 15— Terre Haute 
^'19-rHipp., Chicago 
1 " 26— Grand, Chicago 
" 29— Fort Wayne 
Feb. 2— Muskegon 
" 5 — Kalamazoo 
" 8— Battle Creek 
" 12— Flint 
15 — Saginaw 
22— Lansing 
" 26— Jackson 
29— Bay City 






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W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits. 



Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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BOOKED SOLID 

W> V. M. A., B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

Direction, LEW CANTOR 






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Direction, LEW CANTOR 






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HARVEY DE VORA TRIO 



Our route Season 1919-1920 



Sept 
Oct. 



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2 — South Bend 

6— Gary 

6— Hippodrome, Chicago 

13— Evans vlUe 
16— Terra Haute 
20— Rialto, St. Lonli 
23— Belleville g-; 
27— Columbia, St. Lenta 
30— Alton 



Nov. S-*East St. Louis 
" 6— Qulncy 
" ft- Springfield 
" 18— Champaign 

■•*'• 16— Decatur 

* 20— Pearl a 

* 24— Galesburg 
** 27— MoUne 

Dec 1— Davenport 



Dec 4— Cedar Rapids 

" 7— Dubuque 
- " 11— Dea Moines 
M 14— Sion* City 
" 18— Minneapolis 
" 21-Duluth 
" 25— Superior 
" 28-St. Paul 
Jan. 1— Madiaon 
", , 4— Eockford 



Jan. 8— Green Bay 

" 12— Milwaukee 

■•? lft-Racttwr 

.'*". 22 — Kenosha 

:~T 2ft— American 

S 26— Grand, Chicago ^ 
Feb. 3— Grand, St, Lonla 

" lft-Fort Wayne 

" 19— La Fayette 



W, V. M. A. ft F. KEITH (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

y \ Direction, LEW 



Feb. 23— Kokomo 

" 26— Loganeport . 
Mar. 4 — Jackson 

'•'i^'SMtanalngf ■ 
« 11— Flint '! 

"21-Battie Creek 

• : "' 25— Kalamaroo _..>:■ 



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Marlette's Manikins 

(THE ORIGINAL) 

Featuring "Mutt and Jeff," "Abie Kabibble," "Mr. Jiggs," "The Newljweds" and others. 
. ' v Elaborate stage settings. All comedy. 

1 W. V. M. A., B. 9i Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits 

Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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PERSONALLY 
PRESENTS 

THE FOLLOWING ACTS 



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DAISY DUGAS WALTER RANKIN 



LAERY DEEGAN GUY DEEGAN 



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CANTOR'S MINSTRELS 



FEATURING 



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BARBEAU GIRLS, CORA HALL^and HARKINS SISTERS 

ANNETTE BARBEAU, Mgr. 




BELLES'* 



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With the MISSES GARNET MARSHALL, FLORENCE YORK, ADA CHAPMAN, JEANNE DU MONT, 

TINA OVERMYRE, EDNA MOSCHELL and INEZ SMITH 

MISS FLORENCE YORK, Mgr. Booked Solid 



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FIVE AMERICAN GIRLS 

With MISSES LILLIAN SEIGER, MILDRED WAUGH, FRANCES WENT WORTH, 

ALICE BURNHAM and AGNES LEE 

v LILLIAN SEIGER, Mgr. 

ASTORFOUR 

With CONNIE BOOTH, EDDIE SMITH) FAY WARREN and JOHNNIE FIELDS 

CONNIE BOOTH, Mgr. 







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7ARI1TY 



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MODISTE 

To Her Majesty the American Artist 

145 North Clark St, Chicago, I1L 



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PHONE: CENTRAL <JM 
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RAY 



WALZER and WALZER 



HELEN 



Booked Solid: W. V. M. A. 



B. F. Keith (Western) and Affiliated Circuits. 



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Direction, LEW CANTOR 



- 



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; financially in the Family Theatre, has pur- 
chased the Como and the Abbott in South 
Buffalo, formerly owned by James Savage. 
Will open under the new management Sept 1. 

,/. [.' The Famous Players-Laeky Co. have filed 
plans (or a fireproof picture exchange. The. 
building will cost ^60,000. 

- ■ ' ■ ■ 

: Manager Bruce Fowler, of the Victoria, la 
•.-'■ resigning and expects to leave. Buffalo. Man- 
ager Michaels, formerly of the Academy, will 
take over the Victoria. 

' -T!".'» ': — — — . 

The Sennett Bathing Girls and "Yankee 
Doodle in Berlin" opened a two weeks' en- 
gagement at the Teck Monday. 

• fi A defective fuse at the Oayety Monday night 
; threw the house into darkness and delayed 
the show half an hour. The audience re- 
mained orderly. , ■ 

DENVER. 

By EDWARD a DAT. 
, With the exception of the' Denham, all of 
Denver's playhouses are open again. The 
picture houses have, of course, been open all 
summer. The Empress, playing Pantages 
vaudeville, was the only legitimate house to 
j remain open during the summer months. Fea- 
turing musical comedy stock, the Tabor opened 
two weeks ago, and has drawn capacity audl- 

I 



encea at practically every performance. The 
Orpheum opened last Sunday, capacity audi- 
ences, the result of Denver's best tourist season. 
The opening of the Broadway last Friday with 
Julian El tinge's 1010 Revue found the house 
sold out for the opening performance. 

The Denham will open August 81, according 
to an announcement made by Manager Ben 
Ketcham, who Just returned from a trip to 
the East, where he procured a number of good 
scripts for the "Wilkes Players, who will again 
appear at Denver's newest playhouse. Den- 
ham declares the actors' strike will not prove 
, detrimental to the scheduled opening at the 
Denham. 

The company to open the new season will see 
few changes over the one of last season. 
George Barnes, the leading man, will return. 
Ruth Robinson, who played leads before Mar 
Buckley Joined the company last season, will 
return. Evelyn Moore and Dora Clement will 
replace Ruth Hammond and Klrnan King. 
Otherwise the roster will remain the same. The 
•opening bill Is unannounced. 

The National Film Corp., which went Into 
bankruptcy court recently and surrendered Its 
property consisting of thirty acres of land and 
a $75,000 studio at Engelwood, Cplo., Is to be 
revived by its organizer and former president, 
O. D. Woodward, former manager of the Den- 
ham Theatre. 

Woodward and W. H. Ender. a Denver lum- 
ber dealer, have purchased the corporation's 



property from EL J. Johnson, to whom It was 
surrendered last week. Old stockholders will 
be given the opportunity to come Into the re- 
organised company. Just as soon as the new 
company Is financed and organised, Mr. Wood- 
ward will begin the making of picture*. 

With the dlsbandment of the Live Wire Over- 
seas Entertaining Unit, Frank A. Vardon and 
John Perry, Denver vaudeville artists, are 
home again. These young men were with the 
group of actors that spread cheer to the Ameri- 
can forces through weary weekB of fighting 
and watchful watting In France, Belgium and 
Germany. The team will leave for the Bast 
within the next few weeks to be listed on the 
Keith Circuit 



Members of the musical comedy stock com- 
pany and the orchestra of the Tabor Journeyed 
to U. 8. Hospital No. 21 at Aurora, Colo., last 
Friday and put on a full performance for the 
amusement of 2,500 tubercular soldiers. "The 
Three Twins," the current bill, was produced. 
Captain A. T. Hardy, Colorado's crack rifle 
shot, gave an exhibition ef shooting. 



The Julian Eltlnge Revue, which opened at 
the Broadway last Friday, was originally sche- 
duled {o open Saturday. The railroads through- 
out the Rocky Mountain regions have been 
tied up for several weeks because of washouts, 
and, to play safe, Saturday was announced as 
the opening date. The company, however, 



reached Denver forty-eight hours ahead of 
schedule, and, because of the overcrowded eon-' 
dltlon of Denver, the theatre was opened for 
the benefit of the thousands of pleasure seekers. 
The revue played the Crystal Theatre, Albu- 
querque, N. SI., August 12 and 18, 

Mrs. Sarah Simpson, of Wichita Falls, Tex., 

a member of a Pacific Coast picture corpora- 
tion, has Died a breach of promise suit against 
J. J. Brown, a Leadville, Colo., multi-million- 
aire and clubman. Mrs. Simpson seeks »100,- 
000 as heart balm. Brown's wife was one of 
the rescued passengers of the Titanic 

s Bill Strothers, the world's champion building 
climber, performed a "human fly" feat here 
last Saturday by scaling the wall of the a A 
S. Building for the benefit of the Newsboys' 
Club of the Rocky Mountain News and the 
Denver Times. 

Edward 8. Tewkabury has purchased the 
Princess at Sterling, Colo., from Mrs. Anna M. 
Ashburn. Cyrus Sparks, former exhibitor of 
Casper, Wyo„ will manage the playhouse, 
which will be opened within the next few days. 
At present the house is undergoing Interior 
repairs. 



A crack naval band, assisted by a number of 
vaudeville artists from the Empress, presented 
an open-air show at the Greek Theatre on 
Thursday night of last week. 



r 



IRVING 



BOY 




and 




"Colored Comedians Par Excellence 1 ' 

Booked Solid— W. V. M. A.— B. F. KEITH (Wes tern) and Affiliated Circuits 

* Direction, LEW CANTOR 



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The Biggest Hit 

of our 
Successful Career 

Gowns by Mme. Kahn 
i Author, 

JOE BROWNING 



On 34th Street 
A, RATKOWSKY, Lie. 

The Old-Fashioned Farrier* 




Advance Models 



All are offered at the price you would 
bare to pay wholesale, we manufacture 
our own models and abolish the whole- 
sale and retail profit ! 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT TO 
THE PROFESSION 

Stored, Repaired 
and Remodeled 



*«■ 



The Majentlc la closed tor Mpalra. 
opens Labor Day. 



It 



Fred Shufor baa arrived In Detroit to super- 
vise the remodeling and the reopening of the 
'Washington Theatre, which lease passes Into 
the hands «f William Pox Sept 1- It will 
close for several weeks while • the necoaaary 
changes are being made tor a picture policy, 

Fitzpatrlok A MoBlroy will brsak ground 
soon for a new theatre to be erected In She- 
boygan, Mich., costing 150,000, It will be for 
pictures. This same Arm recently opened a 
new house in Alpena, . 

Col. William Marshall, for 12 tost* with 
the Batterneld Circuit, will wanaflo the Fnirur, 
Kalamatoo, which opens Labor Day. 

D. W, Foley, former house manager of the 
Madison, Detroit, has resigned to aoeept the 
management of the Franklin, flaglnvw. 

The Powers, Grand R»pldn, which playa the 
legNlttSte road mttractlons. In arranging to 
show feature pictures tor the next thnse 
months, 'owing to the strike situation. 

The LaSalle Gardens Theatre Oe., with a 
capital stock of $276,000, has Just been organ- 
ised to build a bl(? picture house in the vicinity 
Of La8a.Ho Garactfe, Detroit's most popular 
residential section. 



"London Belles," at the Gayety. 
"Twentieth Century Maids," 



New, 



"Lid Lifters." It the Cadillac 

At the photoplay houses: ; "A sporting 



WANTED 

GIRL QUARTETTE 

GIRLS WITH VOICES 
Besson'B Contract Guaranteed 

LEE MUCKENFUSS 

307 Potnam BIdg. New York, 



HAti 




and 
TOM 



SMITH 

Presenting "All In Fan," booked solid 

L»ew Circuit 

Ant. 26th— Boston end Fall Hirer 

Sept. 1st— Springfield • Providence 

Pilot, MARK LEVY 

' 



DETROIT. 

. fiy JACOB BHITH. 
Richarh Oarle, in "Simsblno," at the Gsr- 
rlck. way remain second week. MaaaMr 
Hlohard Lawronco Is planning to keep his beat 
attractions for tw.o weeks, as past eiporleace \ 
hss proven that Detroit Is a good two-week 
stand. 

Jack Dempsey show due to open a week at 
the New Detroit, Aug. 24. 



7 






A New Atlantic City 

is right at our door, only 50 min- 
utes from Manhattan, where there 
is one of the finest ocean beaches 
and boardwalks in the world, and 
where profit-making opportunities 
are equally as great as in Atlantic 
City years ago. 

BEACH 

with its miles of Boardwalk, hun- 
dreds of handsome houses and at- 
tractive bungalows. 

The Estates of Long Beach 

have authorized me to liquidate 
for whatever they may bring, to 
sell lor whatever the public may 
see lit to pay at 




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70 New Bungalows 



AND 



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1100 LOTS 



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Directly on Ocean and Boardwalk 
and in Hie Heart of Long Beach 



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Near the Bio; Hotels, the Atlantic Ocean, 
Railroad Station, New Yacht Clnb (un- 
der construction), the Channel and the 
Proposed New Bridge. 





.30th 



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and 



At 2 P. M., on the premises, 
rain or shine, under tent 



Labor Day, Sept. 1st 

This is a unique sale, to be held at the 
end of the seashore season, at a time 
that is not advantageous to the owners, 
the Estates of Long Beach, who have 
, spent over $15,000,000 on miles of board-. 
. / walk and hundreds of houses and bunga- 

lows in doing their part to make Long 
Beach New York's premier Ocean front 
resort and all-year residence section. 

Liberal Terms 

60% may remain on mortgage 3 years at 5 l / 2 %. Title policies 
tree from Title Guarantee and Trust Co. 



Send for Bookmap 

31 Nassau St., New York City 
Telephone: Rector 1500 




Auctioneer 



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MUSIC 



DETROIT 

137 W. FORT ST. 




PUBLISHERS 






NEW YORK 

219 W 46™ ST. 



NOTHING BUT HITS 



CHICAGO 

634 STATE LAKE BLDG. 

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THE WONDERFUL FOX TROT BALLAD 
THAT WE HAVE JUST PURCHASED FROM 
LEE S. ROBERTS COMPOSER OF "SMILES* 



««•♦ 



TELL ME 

IN FOREVER BLOWING BUBBLES 

A SENSATIONAL SONG Hit 

(aVEMEASMIlEANPKKS 



BY ALEX SULLIVAN WHO WROTE "KISSES* 

THUS QUALIFYING AS All IT" WRITER.. . 

"GIVE ME A SMILE AND KISS" IS ft SURE FIRE HIT SONG 



aLlMrKK) MRP ft I 




99 BY YELLEN ft CUI1BLE . A SOWO FOR ACTS 
WHO WANT A QUICK LIVELY NUHBER . THESE 
TWO WRITERS HAVE GIVEN US MORE "HIT" 
WYIESOHOS THAU ALLTHE OTHER WWTWS PUT.TOfiml» 



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A BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL 
NUMBER ON. THE HICH 
ROAD TO POPULARITY 



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RELEASED THROUGH THE COURTESY 
OFAL JOLSON-ASURE FIRE HIT! 






iv. 

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HHmEUHP 
OUT Of THE EAST 
ILL SIX SHE DOES 
HER DANNY 

NY LITTLE SUNSHINE 
NOT IN A THOUSAND YEARS 

THE BEST 12-* BALLAD WE HAVE EVER HAD THE PLEASURE OF LISTENING TO 

EVERYTHING! Professional Copies, Vocal Orchestrations, 
REAWFORYOV\ Dance Orchestrations Etc. 

CAILAT ONEOFOTO OFFKK 



•• 



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A BEAUTIFUL SENTIMENTAL ROMANTIC 
IRISH BALLAD 5UNC WITH TREMENDOUS 
SUCCESS BY AL JOLSON BUT RELEASED FOR ALL 

'•• BY JONES * OONflAD 
AN EXCELLENT 
POPULAR NUMBER 



NEW YORK 

£10 W. 4«UST. 

BROOKLYN 

5«6 rULTOUSt 

PROVIDENCE 
nunc Hit nalliivom 

BOSTON 

22STBETJOW5T 

PHILADELPHIA 

31 SOUTH 9« 5T. 



WASHINGTON 
e9 4ndD.STS.ft.ir. 

PITTSBURG 

W riFTH AVE.RO0HS1 

CLEVELAND 

HmovKmt ■ldc. 

SEATTLE 
ATLANTA. 

•Ol FLKWIOM DLDC. 



BALTIMORE 
mm WPT.5tcw»Ti«va>wce. 



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TORONTO MINNEAPOLIS 
i27vo«ar st. Munc.DEPr.powEFfttiEBCAirnuE <o 

DETROIT POBTLANDOBE 

1ST rORT ST. W. 922 WASBHidTOX^T 

CINCINNATI SAD FRANCISCO 
the rmnvnc kept 90ft market $7. 

ST. LOUIS LOS ANGELES 

ORAXDLZAMR JJU3IC DEPT. 427 SOt BROADWAY 

CHICAGO KANSAS CITY . 

•24 STATE LAKE ftLDf. l£AO SSOOKLYN AVE. 



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HARRY STONE 



Presents 



NIOBE WATER SPRITE 

AMERICA'S AQUATIC MARVEL 

The only person in the world that actually talks and sings under water without the aid of any mechanical device. 

A FEATURE ON ANY BILL GUARANTEED BOX-OFFICE ATTRACTION. 

Special spectacular, scenery and electrical effects. 

Thanking MR. SAM HARRIS, of San Francisco y 



Clothes, That's All 



Now that the new theatrical season 
is at hand, the Mme. Kahn outfitting 
shop is fully prepared to show a com- 
plete, exclusive line of GOWNS, SUITS 
and WRAPS, especially designed to 
meet every demand of the stage and 
street. 




148 West 44th Street 



New York City 



CALL NOTICE CALL 

All people engaged for 

TOM COYNES FRENCH BABIES 

With BILLY WILD 

Rehearsing at Teschmacher's Casino, 618 9th Ave, corner 44th St. 

PLAYING NATIONAL BURLESQUE CIRCUIT 

Chora* Glrla wanted. Best salaries paid, everything furnished. Railroad 

fares paid both ways. Acknowledge call, Room 801, Colombia Theatre Bldg. 



Chance," at the Broadway-Strand ; "Barglar 
by Proxy," at the TJadleon ; "Whom the Gods 
Would Destroy," at the Washington, and "City 
of Comrades," at the Adams. 

"Yankee Doodle In Berlla," with Bothwell 
Browne and the same Mack Bennett Girls who 
appeared tn person at' New York and Chicago 
with the picture, will open at the BroadWay- 
Btrand Theatre for a run starting Sept. 7. 

It looks as If quite a number of the out- 



skirt picture bouses will play vaudeville the 
coming season as an added attraction. 

Tbe new theatre which Henry 8. Koppin is 
building on Gratiot, near Antolne, will be for 
vaudeville. 



INDIANAPOLIS. 



By VOLNBY B. FOWLER. 
MURAT.— "The Fortune Hunter" (Stuart 
Walker Co.). .. 



FOLLOWING A€TS WANTED: 

Posing act with 3 to 5 people. Single posing act with 
slides. Female single and double. Athletic acts. Girl 
diving act. Winston's Seals. Odiva. 

LONG SEASON. Write X. Y. Z., care VARIETY, NEW YORK 



KEITH'S.— Summer vaudeville. 
RIALTO— Vaudeville and pictures. 
PARK.— Broadway Belles. 
• GAYBTY.— Vaudeville and pictures. 
CIRCLE.— PfcturSH. 

"Piccadilly Jim," a sew play by P. O. Wode- 

house and Guy Bolton, |wlll be presented for 
the first time In any theatre at the Marat the 
week beginning Aug, as by the Stuart Walker 
Co. Stuart Walker baa obtained the American 

rights. v. 

Two weeks out of each month this winter 
the Rlalto will present one-week bills, the re- 
mainder of the month being devoted to bi- 
weekly bills. Manager Fred B. Leonard Is 
making the change In order to bring more 
vaudeville head liners to bis theatre. 

■ Keith's will open the winter season Sept 15. 

The new Rlalto (vaudeville), rebuilt at a 
cost of more than $250,000, will be opened 
early in September, it Is thought Interior 
decoration and furnishing being the only de- 
tails left uncompleted at this time. — • 

The Little Theatre Society, of Indianapolis, 
has been incorporated, and Is attempting to 
obtain permanent quarters. i 

The Premier Amusement Company, of Evans- 
ville, lad., Hied preliminary certificate of 
dissolution with the secretary of state. 

Manager Ross Garver opened the Hippo- 
drome, a vaudeville house, at Terre Haute, 
Ind., for tbe winter season Aug. 18, playing 
six acts instead of five as heretofore. The 
Hippodrome Is in the Western Vaudeville Cir- 
cuit 



FOR SALE 



RED VELVET DROP 

20x«o-Two pj m i Centre opsins 

Address RED DROP. VARIETY. Hew York 

C. S. MONTANYE 

_ _ ». W|1 J , J ** Vandwllle 
Acu for Bteter and lorefe*. Jew Martin. Larry Ben- 
nett, That Girl Trio, ana otners. By appotntnTent. 
851 West 181st St. Ne^Vork 

Mj St. MloboUs wu ^; 



i FOR SALE 

Degan De Luxe Nagaed 
Xylophone 

Four eetejesjaassr used, absolutely new. An Ideal 
Instrument for one desiring to do » auule xylophone 
act Can be seen any day. Bargain^ **""~™ w 

FRANK J. HENRY 
Cars M. Water, 126 West 84th St., New York City 



Telephone BRYANT (888 



SOL. GREENSTEIN 

248 WEST 48TH ST. NEW YORK 

Near Eighth Ave. 

I PAY TBE HIGHEST PRICES 

FOR CAST-OFF CLOTHING 

PlssH sesd Portal or 'Phone sad I will call. 9 



Rumors are persistant in Terre Haute that 
Marcus Loew Is contemplating the purchase 
of the Rea Building at Eighth and Wabash 



ft 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



■ 
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I 



smiles 




Ed ***** Lo-ve and Jay 

\ FEATURING 

Miss Wilbur, the Perfect Formed Beauty, with a Wonderful Personality- 
Managers, Agents and Artist-Friends: Please help me protect my finish trick, Lo-Ve 

t Leap, from thieves. • 

World's Greatest Ring Act 

Direction, ALT. T. WILTON 



I AM THE ORIGINATOR 
NEW COSTUMES & RIGGING 



pi 

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I 

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Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 



Lo-Ve Leap 






, ■ ■ , ^ . i ti ; ,. -, ■ • _ r-K.f ,, '-,*- 






VARIETY 



BIG HITS FOR GOOD ACTS! 

YOU HAVE W ANTED TO BREAK AWAY FROM THE "STALE'' MATERIAL AND 
■ GET SET ON SURE-FIRE NEW NU M BtiRS FOR THE COMING SEASON. SUC- 
CESSFUL ARTISTS /DO NOT GAMBLE IN THEIR CHOICE ! 

REPORTS FROM HEADLINERS USING THEM PROVE ~~ 

YOU TAKE NO CHANGES WITH THESE SONGS 



"YOU DIDN'T WANT ME WHEN YOU HAD ME" 

(WHY DO YOU WANT ME NOW?) 

Every line from start to finish has a "Punch." It is one of those rare sob ballads that captivates and finds immediate 

favor with any type of audience. . _. I ' ,4,/ 

Male or female or sister versions ready— which do yon want? 



"KENTUCKY DREAM" 

This is an exceptionally choice bit of melody. A high class waltz ballad that \ improves with repetition and makes 

anything else suffer by comparison. 
Male or female versions ready— which do you want? ./ 



"BLUES" 



(My Naughty Sweetie Gives To Me) 

It's Impossible to find a shimmy number that sets an audience sway* 
ing and hungry for more like this one— grab it! Double and single 
patter choruses ready— which do you want? . 



"LET'S HELP THE IRISH NOW 

Here's a timely appeal that gets a tremendous hand every time it's sung. You don't have to "wave a flag." It gets by on 
;Vdb<£» ■- i* 8 legitimate value— the words and music fits any spot in the act , 



"SIPPING CIDER THRU' A Sf RAW" 

A Fatty Arbuckle lisping comedy song. A lot of laughs and a bundle of tongue, twisting lines that makes a hit with the 
t a^ , , 'grown up" and little kiddies. ,- 

Double and single versions and patter choruses ready— which do you want? 



"WHY DO THEY CALL THEM WILD WOMEN?" 

Ask your audience and watch the result! Smiles— Laughs— Roars of Merriment— Thunderous Applause— Encores 

Galore— A bigger "rep" for you I 
Male and female versions ready — which do you want? 



Prof, copy and orchestration sent fcee to recognized performers— 'Write or call for yours 



119 N.Clark St, 
Chicago 



cJos IK Stern IS Co. 



181 Tremonr Sr.. 
Boston , 



N EW YQ R K 



STUDIOS. NOW LOCAIcO AT 



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226 West 46 th. Street 



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♦VARIBTY 



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On Account of the Tremendous £ig Success and the Phenomenal Business of 

GITS HILL'S MINSTRELS 

AND THE DEMAND FOB THIS ATTRACTION THROUGHOUT THE COUNTRY FOR TIME, 
HAVE DECIDED TO ORGANIZE ANOTHER MINSTREL COMPANY 

W ANTUn . SINGERS, DANCERS, COMEDIANS, SPECIALTIES, 
ffiiill&lJ V NOVEL FEATURES BAND and ORCHESTRA. 

Also Wanted:-— Musical Comedy People with Specialties for the following: 

"KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES," "SPIDER AND THE ELY," "MUTT AND JEFF," "THE BLACK 

CROOK," "BRINGING UP FATHER," "THE ARABIAN NIGHTS," "HUMPTY DUMPTY," "ALLADDIN." 

GUS HILL, Columbia Theatre, New York City 



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avenues and the erection of a vaudeville house 
on IU lit*. 

Byron Brontllnger, Jr., returned Mllor, has 
assumed watrol Qf tie Libert, vaudorlilo and 
picture theatre In Terro Haute. 

The Orand at Terre Haute, the only theatre 
in Indiana which shown Sunday burlesque, will 
open Au ? . 24 with "The Cabaret Girls." The 
Grand shows American Wheal Burlesque on 
Sundays eniv. the week da/ programs being 
Itgltlmatei. The legitimate season will open 
Aug. 27 with "Sunshine." It la understood 
that there la an effort on foot among Terra 
Haute church leaden to Induce the city coun- 
cil to prevent the Sunder burlesque perform- 



ACTOR 



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No One 

Knows, 

or Cares 

Where 

You Eat 

or Sleep-— 

But 

Everyone 

Look,, at 

Your 

Clothea 



S \ .... 

Ready to Wear or 
fi Made to Measure 



MACKS 

1582-1584 Broadway 

Opp. Strand Theatra 



WANTED 
FOR 



CHAS. W. BOYER'S 



AMUSEMENT ENTERPRISES, INC 

Specialty People— Chora b Girls and Novelty Acta for following 
Vaudeville Production*: 

"LOVELAND BOUND" 
"MISS BELINDA'S BOARDING SCHOOL" 
"MAMMY JINNY'S BIRTHDAY" 
"FIVE DANCING DEARIES" 
# "MARYLAND MELODY MAIDS" 
and 1920 Edition "PETTICOAT MINSTRELS" 



DOTTIE CLAIRE 



IN PREPARATION 

NEW ACT FOB 

AND HEB SYMPHONY GIBL8! 

I Apply Boom 320, Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg., Dally, 11 A. M. to 5 P. M. 



O. Carletoa Our, famous Indiana repertory 
actor, has entered the storage business In 
Indianapolis aa a aide line. Mr. Guy has two 
companies out under canvass touring the 
Hoosler state thin summer. 

Stage hands and musicians la Indianapolis 
have been granted wage Increases for the com- 
ing season. 

— 

The Newport Stock Co., under the manage- 
ment of Roy E. Hogan, was organised here 
last week to tour the South under canvass, 





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WANTED 

COMPETENT VAUDEVILLE 
THEATRE MANAGER 

Mmt have • had eaperieaee with feature 
picture* and be able tv. cet proper pre- 
Jeetlone. Give 1 referencs. C. Hi M1I.K8. 
Orpheam Theatre, Detroit, Mich. 



Phone: Circle 732 

Catering to the Protection for 20 Yean 

Heafeaartere of Theatrical 

WARDROBE TRUNKS 

(29 — nebular value, $45 

Base eed Suit Basse* O ur Luieaoe Is Guaranteed 

8. RAINESS. 222 Watt 62nd St.. New York 

One Door West of Broadway 



MANAGERS AND AGENTS— NOTICE: 

jennie McLaughlin 

"CIKL IN TUB MOON" 
for the past eight' years, la no longer with 
the act. Watch for Jennie In a new act I 
Addreea 711t'Btclna* Bn Ave, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 



■YOU ARE NOW IN TOWN.., 

-, SAVE YOURSELF FtTCRE 
PAIN AND TROUBLE 

See Dr. A. M. WEISS 

OFFICIAL DENTIST TO N. V. A. 
1489 Broadway, at 43rd Street 

gy Special Bummer Rates "CD 



IF YOU DON'T ADVERTISE IN VARIETY— 
DON'T ADVERTISE 



v Mr. Galilean la a defendant la the autt of 
Mrs. Mary Evans, colored, for $10,000 damages 
which Is to be tried Id Terre Haute Superior 
Court, Oct 24. Mrs. Evans auea becaUM Man- 
ager Galllgan refused her admtseton to the 
flrat floor of the Grand last spring whan Lieut 
Jim Europe's Jazs Band waa there because of 
her color. Colored cKlsens were admitted to 
the second and third floors. Indiana theatre 
managers regard the suit as a test ease of 
their right to establish box office rules. 

Upon the objection of the Terra Haute Re- 
tail Merchants' Association, Mayor Hunter has 
held that no more carnivals may be held wlthia 
the city limits. 

Charles W. Tyler, who claims ha operated, 
the first picture show In Indianapolis, haw has* 
appointed^ branch manager for Indir 



two houses are to be operated by the Ameri- 
can Co. 



Plans for the organisation of a symphony 
orchestra are under way In Indianapolis. 



Henry K. Burton will present Ivan D. 
Martin's New York Models In a "Fashion Show" 
at the Murat <week of Sept & Local mer- 
chants will furnish the style. displays. 

The Barton Theatrical Booking Ofloss have 
contracted to furnlah ten big vaudeville and 
open air attrastloha for the Pendleton, Ind., 
Fan Festival, Sent 8 to 187 



Exhibitors'" " Mutual ms^trnting^rpoe^oo! 
of New York Hie headquarters will bo in 
this olty. 



The •rnheum. •( Terra Saute, Maarlee »«, 

"■"■f"' ilSl^"™. 01 *** 1 (,r improvenieats 
valued at W.OOO. The Orpheam Co; haa been 
ceablaed) with the American Theatre Co., oper- 
atlag: the Amerloaa la Terre Hants, and the 



Blanche Latell 

NOW WITH 

"OVERSEAS REVUE" 

OBtPHEUM- TIME 




Long )e»i» oi eiuuy ui rural cBarioUrs, oenUaed With' 
many years of musical training, make . . 

CHARLES ALTHOFF 
"The Sheriff «f Hldwrllle" . 

one of Ihe prodomlnatluj srUats la his partteular line 
on the »taie today. ^^^^^^^ 



'A 



NO MATTEB WHAT TBE 
CRITICS THINK 

Booked Till March 1920 

B. F. KEITH'S— W. V. M. A. CIRCUITS 
WBAT COULD BB SWEETER? 

SOME BIO TIME- 

mRffcTBlf AT ALU 
BUT PLENTY OF TIME 
Att- THE TIME. 

DAVE MANLEY 

IU "LEAVE THE HALL" 
DEEHLER '• JACOBS 
. CHAS.* POTSDAM 



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(BALLAD FOX-TROT) 






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VUBLISHEH 
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Professional and Orchestra Dept. 



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1552 Broadway 



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JACK BOBBINS 

General Manager 

t We ttristdpher Columbused-^SMILES" and "TELL Mtf 



LINCOLN, NEB. 

The Orptaum will open (or the season Aug. 
20. Harry H. BUIIngi, formerly of- Uu PtltM 
and Maleatlc, of Milwaukee, will manage the 
house (his season, succeeding Jack Yao, who 
has taken over Mr. BllliotV house* In Mil- 
waukee. ■ 

The Lyric has closed for the rammer, and 
will soon open under /the management ot the 
Princess Amusement Co. ' under the super- 
vision of L. M. (Joe) Carman. The policy 
of the bouse has not as yet been announced. 



■ 

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The Liberty, which has been closed for the 
past few weeks, opened to show "The Un- 
pardonable Bin," but business waa not up to 
expectations. 

The Rial to and I Colonial are the only houses, 
excepting the smaller ones, staying open the 
entire summer. Business has been only fair, 
although good pictures have been shown at both 
houses. 

Capital Beach opened up with a lot of now 
attractions and did well until the management 
got Into trouble with the labor unions, and as 
a result the receipts have taken a hard tumble. 

PORTLAND, ORE. 

By JOSEPH GRANT KELLEY, JB. 
PANTAOBS.— Vaudeville. 
HIPPODROME-BTRAND. — Vaudeville and 
pictures. 
HE1LIO.— 17, Alexander, maglcUn. 
ALCAZAR,— 18. Alcaiar Musical •Comedy la 
"King Dodo," with Mabel Wllber and Oscar 
Flgman In the leads. 
OAKB.— Armstrong Folly Co. 




Attention ! 
Performers 

In spite of the High Market Prices on ■, 

Trunks and Leather Goods 

we are In a position to offer yen ALL MAKES 

and ALL STYLES of TRUNKS at exceptionally 
low prices. HARTMAN. MUKPHY. NEVER- 
BBBAK, BELBEB. INDESTBUCTO and other 
makes toe numerous te mention. LEATHER 
GOODS and TRAVELERS' OUTFITS AT LOW- 
EST PRICES. " 

A call will convince you 

STRAND LUGGAGE SHOP 

1578 BROADWAY, N. Y. STRAND THEATRE BUILDING 

HEART OF THE THEATRICAL CENTRE 



Thll Model (M Illustrated) 

Full slse (bulge top), three-ply 
veneer hard vulcanised fibre; con- 
tains 12 hangers, laundry Bar, 
shoe pocket, Ave drawer*— elf 
hand riveted. 



VALUE 

SPECIAL AT. 



$35 



Liberty, Columbia, Sunset, Globe, Peoples, 
Circle, Majestlo, Star.— -Motion pictures. 

By Sept. IS, all theatres In Portland will be 
under full sway. The Lyric opens Aug. 81 
with a new musical comedy company ; Orpneum 
opens Aug. 81 with Beasle Clayton as head- 
liner ; Baker opens about Sept 7 with a flrat* 




" 



P. DODD ACKERMAN 
SCENIC STUDIOS 

INC. 

STAGE PRODUCTIONS 

Productions of Distinction 

(P. DODD ACEERMAN, Designer) 

STUDIO: 140 WEST 89th STREET 

NEW YORK CITY 

Phone t Greeley 30H 



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•/ 



CHARLES CLEAR 

1 r • ' -*■ 

• i 

Has returned from France after seventeen months with the A. 
E. F. Mr. Clear is preparing a single offering for vaudeville 

similar to the turn he did overseas. 



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VARIETY 

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| A SOREAM LYRIC M GREAT MELODY 

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'I no M«nole Country Will Soon Be Raving About This Great Big Comedy Song Hit the Same as New York 
I Is Now. All Kinds of Extra Choruses and Double Versions. A CORKER FOR THE LADIES. * « 

ALL THE BIO HEADLINERS n "Aftfi! D ARE3ALREADY SINGING IT 



Give Me The Sultan's Harem 

Auxtn&n <Woril You 0lTO Th * 1 H " ,m To Me) ABNiatSu&BR 



CHORUS 








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COPIES AND ORCHESTRATION 




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RVICE 



M. WITMARK & 



al. inwn 

Im Frtatlm. Cat. 

5o« rmtm ***■ 

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jack cumcr 

PratlaMM, « I. 
18 Billmj BL 



EO. EDWARD! 
PMiMiiphii. Pa. 

99 It. Mlatk *l 

JOS. IT" BASH 

Dcanr, Cat 
420 lartk aiHk 



JACK UHEY 

Iwtaa, In. 

218 Tnanat St 

HAL M. RII6 

iCaaiat city. Ma. 

fialaty Tlwatit BM|. 




AL. COOK. 1662 Broadway/New York 

(Nautt to Palace 1ha.tr « 



N. ROM aVCLSBE AL WtRTH 

si. Paat. ■!■». cimiM*. a. 

Eatatriaa mnmiia c*. 411 1 PmaaM So. 

BASREV HASAN 
500 Vaatallai SMB. 



BRVA8T N. PSEHNO 

'ttbtarak. Pa. 

947 M A«a. 



STOREY KLEIR BILLY RJALLCT 

S3 Wkltawrt A*. St una, tv 

«N LaU CH,. Itak 481 NM BM*. 



DBS NSWARD 

Claahnan. Skta 

621 Mala It 

JIKI ■aCARTHV 

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VARIETY 



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&OYAL, NEW YORK— THIS WEEK— (Aug. 18)— On Sixth and STOPPING one show after another 

The Columbia Phonograph Artist 

WILBUR SWEATMAN 

The Original and Much-Imitated Jazz and Ragtime Clarinetist 
x Featuring the Playing of 2 and '3 B b Clarinets at the Same Time 

ASSISTED BY TWO SUPREME JAZZISTS 

NEXT WEEK *AUG. 25th), BUSHWICK, BROOKLYN 



, PLATING HJS LATEST NUMBERS: • . \ 

"SWEATMAN BLUES" and 

'1DOWN HOME RAG" 
"BOOGIE RAG" and "THAT'S GOT »EM" 



:. 




ion, PAT 




■■ 



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ROYAL, NEW YORK, THIS WEEK (Aug. 18) 

MARIE • IRVING 



:■•■■: ... 



X 




AND 




In their Classy Skit, entitled "AT THE BALL" 

A New York paper said: "A real big time act because Mis a Walsh is a dancer of exceptional ability, because Mr. 
Edwards' pedal peculiarities were fondly applauded, because Walsh and Edwards have youth, appearance and ability, 
and because Walsh and Edwards ABE HEADED STRAIGH T FOR THE PALACE. 

Direction, RAY HODcboN 



. . '■'■• '.-■ .,-■ • 



. 



MUSI 



' V GIRL MUSICIANS , 

SEE BOYER 

320 Knickerbocker Theatre Bldo.-i I A. M. to 5 P. M. 

class dramatic stock, and the Auditorium win 
start housing a number of good road shows 
about the same time. The Alcazar Is to con- 
tinue with its present policy, light opera. 

Known by dhe profession everywhere as 
"Bab," theatrical restaurant man and caterer, 
James H. Babcock 1b dead. Word has been 
received here that Babcock recently had com- 
mitted Bucide by Jumping from the steamer 
West Togus while off the coast of Long Island, 
N. Y, It is believed his mind was unbalanced. 

H. W. Poole, present owner of the Liberty, 
Klamath Falls, has obtained land in that city, 
and will begin at once the erection of a new 
$50,000 theatre with 1,800 seating capacity. 

The Majestic Theatre has booked all the pro- 
ductions of the "big four." 

Have Your Face Corrected 

It Pays In Business, In the Home, in Society— 

or Wherever Ton Go 

Immediate, Invisible. Improved Methods 



Billle Bingham, who has been playing leads 
tor the Lyric Musical Comedy Co., has signed 
a contract with the Cloverlo Film Company, 
' and is to be featured in eight one-reel come- 
dies. ' 

PROVIDENCE. 

By KARL K. KLAHK. 

SHUBERT MAJESTIC— Mary Pickford in 
"Daddy Long Legs," film. Probably no fea- 
ture film ever shown in the city - has been 
more extensively advertised. 

E. F. ALBEE. — With but a few weeks more 
of summer stock before the opening of vau- 
deville for the first time in this new million 
dollar playhouse, the E. F. Albee Stock Com- 
pany this week is presenting for the first 
time here 1 "A. Successful Calamity." Charles 
Schofleld and Edith Lyle have the leading 
parts. The stock company is going; juet as 
big ss ever as the season draws to an end 
and it is safe to say that this season's com- 
pany will go down as one of the best In re- 
cent years: 

FAY'S.— This week's bill is headed by the 
"Liberty Dancers" followed by Ishlkawa 
Brothers, Friend' and Downing, Edwin Red- 
ding and Co-, Nevlns and Mayo,. Sidney John 
Smith, "Tarzan of the Apes," feature film. 



this week la O'Brien's Exposition Shows play- 
ing Central Falls during the entire week. 
This Is the second circus the twin cities have 
had this season. 




An attraction that is drawing away from 
the theatres In Pawtucket and Central Falls 



Ida Appelton, 20, claiming to be a Tihow 
girl, coming here from Boston, was placed 
on probation in the Sixth District Court 
here last week when she admitted sufficient 
evidence to convict on a charge of being an 
Immoral person in speech and behavior. 

Berton Churchill, for numerous years a 
member of the E. F. Albee Stock Company, 
left this season's company to Join Comatock 
& Qest's comedy "Adam and Eva." Mr. 
Churchill has been one of the favorites of 
the summer stock company here. 

ROCHESTER. N. Y. 

By L. B. SKEFFINGTON. 

LYCEUM.— William Lawrence in "The Old 
Homestead" for four days begining^ Wednes- 
day. / 

TEMPLE.— Vaughan CJaser and Co. in "Pot- 
ash and Perlmutter." » I • 

OAYETY. — "Rostonlan BurlesQuere." . 

FAMILY. — Fred Webster and Co. in musical 
comedy. 

VICTORIA.— "Cupid's Revue," NeiJ Maek and 
two to fill. Tom Mix in (film) "Wilderness 
Trail," first half ; Gladys Brockwell In "Tne 
Sneak," second halt. 



RIALTO.— "The^Bth of a Race" all week. 

REGENT.— Tom Moore in "Heartsease," first 
half ; "The Man Who Stayed at Home," second 
half. 

PICCADILLY.— Catherine Calvert in "The 
Career of Katherine Bush," first halt; Mabel 
Normand In "Upstairs," second half. 



Next week will be the final week of Vaughan 
Glaser at the Temple, closing eight weeks oi 
stock. "A Pair of Sixes" will be the tare- 
well. The vaudeville season opens Sept. L '■ 

Jessie Lee Nichols and her society horse 
show are playing their second week at On- 
tario Beach Park. 



The actors' strike has not yet affected this 
city, owing to the closed season, but labor 
troubles of an acute character menace the 



SAGGING EARS 

FACES SET 

LIFTED IN 

BEDFORD'S 



IMPERFECT 

NOSES 
CORRECTED 

Call, 'Phone, Write 

253 Fifth Avenue 



i E7 Phene: Madison Bq. 7230 



BILLY "Doughboy Jazzophiends" 

, f-i/ a Y\/f O The premier "Jazz Orchestra" of the A. E. F. 

HI/ § ^N On'» Year at the Palais de Glace; Paris 

■1 ^^ * **f PLAYED" FOR THE NOBILITY OF EUROPE 

Ask President Wilson. Samuel Gompers, Prince of Wales, Hunting and 
Francis, -Wllllard, Ward and Northlane, or any act that played overseas. 

Address, c/o VARIETY, NEW YORK 




&he Stars 



Tfwemadeit 
'Sue rage. 




PHOTOS Size, 8xlO-For 
THEATRICAL or SCREEN PLAYERS 



We employ no agents to annoy you. The quality of our work is our recommendation. 

DELACROIX Studio— 1465 Broadway, Cor. 42rid Street 




■fOSIn cold creams galore, 

JL but the make-up remover which 

holds first place in the regard of the 

profession is ALBOLENE. It is pore, safe. 
and helps von change from "on to "off" 
qoialdr, pleasantly and easily. Prevents 
make-up poisoning. 

For the.Biaktvap box 1 and 2 ounce tabes. 
Abo in 36 and 1 lb. cans. 
Soidbp dr ut g uts anddealertinma k + up 
Write for free lampte. 



McKESSOts&ROBBWS 

I mmmnta i 

Manufacturing- Chemists 

Est. 1880 

91 Fulton Street, NewYoik 




" 






..--:.• . l.i ■• . ■•••'■' 



VARISTY 



MURRAY RITTER NOW IN CHICAGO 



(Grand Opera House Building) 
With 




V Quicker and Bitfger Hit than "()h,Hon I Hate /to: Get l;|) in the Morning." 

: GOT MY CAPTAIN WORKING FOR ME NOW 

They Don't Laugh They Just Howl and Scream 
- Plenty ot New Catch tines. 



"^■■lihi .'t. 



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■ \] liiis i >;> 1 1 a da s 3Mi ! 1 1 i£S A i a s \ % i; | ) i ec 



THE HAND THAT ROCKED MY CRADLE 



v\j noauLjCiil I'oeiii h 



$. Bib< 



Ohy/What/a W 



NOBODY KNOWS 



AND NOBODY SEEMS TO CARE' 



A C; iciiL I )ouUli 



Mak ,,-a-iul -Female:;'! w o (/ it-Is a>r ./Tsy..o Men 






illrvini': B< 



DIT M Y HE art siiiiiiiiii 



!;;k now ^ h at a 1 1 ■ '1 US IN G JU'IRI- hN;RAG ? '•■ Mean? : 



,l;hlMiOM^bUV ANi: 20fi:r 



V. A, CMJB ROOMS 



ItilCVlVO OKFKE:- bKANb-OPERAvUat'SE^BEDOi 



IRVINT3\BERLIN 



MAX:WlNSLOW 



YW :.K-»KKSU)KNT 
lMjL«h 'COS MAVK ,,o. U.NNECTIU.N AltJl \.\\ (VlnCir* ihM 



SAUL BORNSTEIN 



I 



. , v:-:';^^jm^-, '^J^^^^^^^^^^^fWW^'WW^W^^^^^^^^^^^^ : ''$W®#W"' : ; ^.#?3^!^P^ 






VARIETY 






1 



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I 

■■■• 

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Ms- 



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MISS 




SMITH 




Jo Paige Smith's Wife 



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is my new 

BOOKING 
REPRESENTATIVE 

As a business woman she is an 

111 AGE. '.'.: 



•-v..»..^ 



V . ■) 



'■■': >:■:,-■■ 
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>$$&& 



, I sure can congratulate myself 
that she is my Agent for Book- 



;f |A.;i.FWelttl actors of mine, if you 

^^jipj^^iHSft wu * e w represent 
you up at the Big Office, get 
; . _ under her banner at once. 






V 




♦ft* 



The loose Nut" 



local Industries upon which the motion picture 
industry la dependent 

Something not In the manuscript of the play 
happened on the stage of the Family the other 
night, as a result of which two of the principals 
of the Webster musical comedy company tem- 



porarily retired from /the show. Fred 'Web- 
ster was chasing bis wife, Maximo Lockwood, 
about the stage. Just at the climax she 
suffered a fainting spell and collapsed. The 
audience was not fully aware whether It was 
part of tue action of ths play or not. Mrs. 
Webster haa been In 111 health and on the 



World's Largest Theatrical Baggage 



SPECIAL 



WARDROBE 
TRUNK 



OFFER 



MY GUARANTEE PROTECTS YOUR PURCHASE FOB FIVE YEAR! 
"Bat" "LIU," "Mnrpay" 

•Hirtmsnn" "Indwtrueto" "Taylor" 

LEATHER GOODS AND TRAVELERS' OUTFITS 



EVERY 
MAKE 



EVERY 
SIZE 



Guaranteed 
Five Years 

SPECIAL 



'.50 



Regular 
$60 Value 

Mail Orders 
Filled 




FIBRE 

THEATRICAL 

Ladles' or Men's 
Model , 

(As Illustrated) 

12 Hangers 

5 Deep, Roomy 

Drawers 

Leek In 
Top Drawer 
Shoe Feckets 
Lsnndry Bag 

Hsl Boi 



t 



LICENSED AND B0f«£0 .*WfN8ft0*fift 

Do You Need Money? 

M09T LIBERAL LOANS IN TOWN 
on Diamonds ^ffiaicttm, Utwelrif 
&fv&fvrar* t ffa£,f&r* mad Musical 
Jhsirwzienia—Courfaauw 1r*mtm9nt 

An Important Branch of Oar Business lis 

Making Liberal Loans on Fan and Men's 

Clothing. ,. C.C'', 

Proper Care Assured. 

Storage System en Premises 



118 TfflRD AVEfe 

QelStwOeaant 2391 DfcwVork. 



a 



verge ot a nervous breakdown for some time. 
8he was under a doctor's care and In en- 
forced retirement a few weeks ago. When she 
was stricken the other night Mr. Webster, 
too. temporarily itepped out of the company 
to be with her. Audrey Kable and Morris 
Luther substituted for the pair. 



^ SPECIALTY TEAMS 

SEE BOYER 

320 Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg.— II A. M. to I P. H. 



Strikes and rumors of strikes bad no part 
In the. annual picnic of the Rochester The- 
atrical Managers' Association, which was hold 
at Manltou Beach on Lake Ontario. Prac- 
tically all of the managers took a day oft 
and took an active part In staging an out- 
door performance all their own. The start 
wax made from the Lyceum Theatre In auto- 
mobiles. The dsy will long be remembered 
for the freak ball game staged between a team 
of fat managers and a team of skinny man- 
agers. Everybody tried to be stage manager 
or this game, and shortly after It got under 
way It was discovered that most of the man- 
agers did not know as much about playing 
ball as the average small boy. The gang was 
paraded and posed for about an hour for some 
moving pictures, which It was promised would 
be shown In the evening at the dinner In the 
Manltou Hotel. After strenuous effort on the 
part of the camera man to make them smile, 
after lots and lots of patient rehearsing In the 
hot sun and fierce arguing about who should 
star, the picture was finally shot. It was 
never shown, however, as It was announced at 
the time for showing that through accident or 
design there was no film In the camera. 

Stockholders of the Batavla Construction 
Company, owners of the Family Theatre In 
Batavla, have voted to erect a modern theatre 
for the spoken drama on the site of the present 
moving picture house. The new house will 
seat, about 1,M» people and have a stage large 
enough to accommodate moat of the big travel- 
ing companies. The owners of the Family are 
all Batavla people. The manager la Nik Has 
Dlpion. Harry T. Crosby, a retired actor, 
whose home Is In Batavla, is al*> engaged In 
promoting a company to erect another theatre. 
He says be has secured subscriptions for $1&,- 
000 ot the stock ot the company. The theatre 
he proposes will cost about (40,000. 

Paul Fennyvessey. formerly manager of the 
Strand Theatre, has returned from war ser- 
vice witb the rank of sergeant. He probably 
will again sign up with his father's extensive 
theatrical Interests. His sister, Florence, has 
been managing the Strand, a downtown boase 
seating 1300, since he Joined the colors. Other 



Fennyvessey houses 
Rlalto and Princess, 



bere are the Family, 



President Irving M. Salyerda, of the 
Rochester Exhibitors' League, will call a meet- 
ing some time this montb to make arrange- 
ments, for a meeting of the exhibitors of ths 
state (n this city next month. The repeal of 
the movie tax is to bo the principal matter of 
discussion at the meeting of the state body. 

The fair season has started In western New 
York, the Trl-County Pair being held at Cale- 
donia last week and the Wyoming County Fair 
being under way at Warsaw this week. Next 
week the Rochester Exposition will be Btaged. 

SALT LAKE CITY. 

The musical programs at the American have 
been made more enjoyable by the engagement 
of the Salt Lake Opera Quartette, composed 
of Fred C. Orabam, Edna Owyer, Mary. Atkin- 
son and Melvln Peterson, to render special se- 
lections. Frank Olbney will continue to sing 
popular selections between shows. 

O. A. MeUger has resigned as divisional 
manager of the Universal, according to word 
from Mr. MeUger* received In this city. He 
left the Universal August 8. 

George B, Carpenter, manager of the Para- 
mount-Empress', returned last week from a 
vacation trip through Yellowstone National 
Park. 

William Curtis, theatrical manager and con- 
struction expert, was in Salt Lake last week 
on business -In connection with the building 
of the new Rlalto, which Is being erected by 
the Universal Film Manufacturing Company. 
He built the Liberty In Spokane and other 
big playhouses In the Northwest 

Chief W. H. Bywater, of the Salt Lake Fire 
Department, has gone to Los Aneeles to 
appear In a picture feature depleting fire 
hazards, causes end how to fight them. The 
picture began under direction of Thomas H. 
Ince August 6. It will be released through 
the Fire Prevention League. 



, EDWARD CROPPER, 208 W. 42d St. 

fePBONEs BRYANT 8671 NEW YORK C, 



ART FURNITURE 




AT VERY LOW PRICE 

FOil s quarter of a century we have 
been rerogniied primarily for the 
great beauty of our furniture de- 
signs—and for the very low prices we 
offer, because of onr location nut of the 
high rent gone. We cater especially to 
members nf the profession. 

Liberty Loan Bonds Accepted at Fall 
Face Value 



A 3.BOOM APARTMENT 
*32S VALUE COiR 

coiwiitlas si all Partes ravaMsm.. e)£40 

A 4-ROOM APARTMENT 
woo value CQ7K 

Period Fsrsltan et Rare Bssatf... sJQltf 



A S-ROOH APARTMENT 

«* VAIUI. —■- $f*85 



A i-ROOH APARTMENT 

Vuuati* oiatw Is Pirfod PsraNan $750 



OUR LIBERAL TERMS 

1 m 

j-g Spatial 

fcg | Dtieeaat 

Ufssj Awash Us <e SUM 




Write for New So-Pase Catnlog 
and 1-Page Special Sale Circular 



alio to New Tork 
State. Mew Arte? and OaaaeeUeut 

Easily reached from West 8to» by 
00th or 69th Strut Croniown Can 



HOLZWASSER & GO. 



14J3 THIRD AVENUE 
NEAR seTB STREET 



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PRESENTS 



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"CHICKEN CHOW ME1N" 



BRIGHTON, 

THIS WEEK, 
(Aug. 18) 



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GREAT SIGNIFICANCE SEEN 

IN CHANGE OF ATTITUDE 




Two Big British Film Men Suddenly Take Sides With Ameri- 
can Organization. Managing Director of Ashley's 
Exclusives Sells His House to Famous 
Players. Provincial Circuit Manager 
Now An Ardent Booster. 



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. London.^Aug. 6. 

Great lignificance is seen here in the 
fact that E. Lyons, head of the Biocolor 
Circuit of picture theatres,- and also 
managing director of Ashley's Exclu- 
sives, resigned from the General Coun- 
cil of Cinematographers and Exhibitors' 
Association awLalso from the commit- 
: tee of the London Branch of the Asso- 
ciation, and then sold his house to 
Famous Players-Lasky. 

William Blake, head of another pro- 
vincial circuit, artd heretofore very 
antagonistic, has suddenly become an 
- ardent booster for Famous Players. 

AMERICAN MADE COSTUMES. 

V London, Aug. 6. 

The Carmania brought in Schneider, 
and Veronica, of Schneider & Ander- 
"sOn, New York, who came over hera-to 
secure plates from which their firm 
will make the costumes for the Araer- 
tcan''productibn by Comstock & Gest 
of "Aphrodite." The costumes will 
cost in the neighborhood of $80,000. _ 

When Morris Gest was over here 
he paid Percy -Anderson $5,000 to draw 
sketches for the first ace of the pro- 
duction 1 . (Mr. Anderson is not of thc- 
New York firm.) Something arose to 
upset Gest's plans concerning the cos- 
tumes and he is said to have sent the 
New Yorkers over here, with the at- 
tendant expense, to straighten out the 
matter. One report says the modistes 
^m this side asked $140,000 to finish up 
the required work. 

ARMY ENTERTAINERS LIKED. * 

'. ' London, Aug. 6. 

Gilbert Miller presented "Le'Rouge 
et Noir" aggregation at the Savoy Aug. 

; . ■•• This presentation, given by 14 de- 

-• mobilized English Army entertainers, 

is very artistic and made a successful 

debut. 

^.: Business was light, but will prob- 

' ably pick up. 

ACT CRIPPLED ON DEBUT. 

London, Aug. 6. 
r " • The English debut of the American 
;, act, Alexander Kiis, at the Palladium, 
■''was made without the youngest of the 
; r : trio.' A permit was refused for the 
.child's appearance, 
v- This handicap seriously impeded the 
turn and the first performance was 
slow as a result, leaving the outcome 
of the turn's future over here in doubt, 
•-;'_ without the missing member. 

. - Rita Gould Opens at Finsbury Park. 

London, Aug. 6. 
'Rita Gould, just from entertaining 
■'■;.; soldiers in France, opened Monday at 
Finsbury Park. 

Miss Gould fared well enough but 
would have done much better with 
, ' ' more suitable material. Her—numbers 
'/»;' u"sed are not new here. 



Ambassadors Aug. 2. It will not be 
sent on tour. 

Miss Lloyd, the backer, lost $10,000 
during the brief engagement of the 
piece. ' ' 



LONDON 0. H . ROOF CLUB. 

London, Aug. 6. 
A club to be located atop the Lon- 
don' opera house is being organized 
by Jack May. 

BALLET PLAYING ON PERCENTAGE. 

London, Aug. 6. 

The Russian Ballet closed at the Al- 
hambra to a record house. It reopens 
at the Empire Sept. IS on a salary and * 
percentage basis. ^** 

Tjhe Paris opening is set for Dec 15. 

Myitery Woman Before Royalty. 
London, Aug. 6. 
Zomah, the Mystery Woman, was 
honored by a. command to appear be- 
fore Queen Alexandra and the Royal- 
Household at Marlborough House. 

English Rights Sold for Nazimova. . 

t London, Aug. 6. 

Jury, Ltd., has secured from R. A. 
Rowland, president of Metro, the Eng- 
lish rights tc the features in which 
Mme. Nazimova is starred. 



James Doyle Returning to New York. 

London, Aug. 6. 
James Doyle, of Doyle and' Dixon, 
exchanged his sailing passage/' and 
sailed for home on the Orduna, July 31. 

. Command Performance Get* $20,000. 
London, Aug. .6. 
The royal command performance at 
the Coliseum July 28 enriched the Va- 
riety Artists' Benevolent Fund by $20,- 

ooo. • 



WM. ROCK WANTS TO MARRY . 
London, Aug. 6. 

William Rock was. unable "to con- 
summate marriage with Gladys Del- 
cima Tilbury before -Rock sailed yes- 
terday on the Amsterdam. Miss Til - 
, bury, 24 years old, will follow Rock 
in a fortnight, when Rock expects to 
secure the necessary papers at Wash- 
ington. 

Mr. Rock's stage partner, Frances. 
White, was unaware, before leaving, 
Of Mr. White's intention, although he., 
may apprise her of it on board. the 
boat they are both sailing across- on. 
- Miss Tilbury appeared in "Hullo 
America" at the Palace during the 
Rock and White engagement with that 

show. .... - J*. -'.'.. ■— '.-: -- . 

' Just before leaving abo, Rock be- 
came involved in a controversy with 
Don Carney, an English artist, over 
the singing rights to a song, "What 
Was the Tale the Colonel Told the 
Adjutant." Carney claims to be one 
of the authors of the number and to 
hold the world's rights, besides stating 
he has never met Rock, has no one 
authorized to represent him, and, fur- 
thermore, the song is not published. 

Rock answers by saying he holds a ' 
written authorization from the English 
publishers of the number, who are 
^shortly to publish the song over here. 

Each of the parties mentioned above 
in the song controversy cabled an ad- 
vertisement this week,- to Vabibtt 
claiming the iole singing '. rights to 
the song. 

LOEW PLATING LIBERTY, CLEVE. 

Cleveland, Aug. 6. 
The Marcus Loew Circuit will com- 
mence playing* vaudeville at the Lib- 
erty, commencing around Sept. 1. The 
shows will be the usual Loew policy 
of split week bills, six acts to a pro- 
gram and of the same grade as booked 
into McVicker's, Chicago, by Loew 
at present. 

It is reported here Loew will take 
over the house, though up to now 
. only a booking arrangement has been 
reached. , 



SAILINGS. 

London,- Aug. 6. 

Leaving on the Amsterdam yester- 
day were Richard Dixon, Billy Broad, 
William Rock,- Frances White. 

The sailing of the France has been 
postponed until Aug. 9, and that of the 
Baltic until next week. 

Eddie Darling, Jack Curtis, Ray 
Goetz and Al Lewis' are due to sad. 1 ; 
on the France. '...-_•:„"-. 

Reported to Variett by Paul Tausig, 
& Son, 104 East 14th street ; ^ > 

Aug. 2, from New York: Mrs. Beat- 
rice Gurney, Louis Stone, Toby Gillis 
(Rotterdam); ~ ? - " : 

Aug. 9, from Philadelphia: Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Blake and MTss Blake 
(Clarke's Hawaiians), Victor - Oliever, 
Bernard Parrouchi, Peter Corney, 
Joseph Keahola, George Karratti, Aub- 
rey Wesjerman (Haverford) ; -— 

Aug. 20, from New York: Mr. and 
Mrs. Arnold Arnaut, Miss Arnolda 
Amaut, Hennig Ararat- (New Amster- 
dam). 

DE CISNEROS ON CONCERT TOUR. 

Mme. Eteonora de Cisneros, an Amer- 
ican songbird, who appeared in all of 
the European countries and was one 
of the first stafs of Oscar Hammer- 
stein, is to head a concert show which 
will start out in October as a road at- 
traction, playing legitimate theatres at 
a $2 top scale. 

The show will be handled by the 
newly formed National Musical Serv- 
ice Corporation, of which Jack 'Gold- 
berg and Frederick Sard, a concert 
promoter, are the principal director, 
and Walter L. Rosemont is general 
musical director. 

•' Withthe Mme. de Cisneros organiza- 
tion will be a group of singers and 
musicians and a dance ballet will be a 
feature of the program. The aid of 
local musical societies has been prom- 
ised the tour. Mme. de Cisneros was 
known as Eleonore Broadfoot when 
she first appeared. Her greatest suc- 
cess was in "Samson et Delilah." 



Joe Howard Cancelled Col. Date. 

London, Aug. 6. 
Joe Howard arranged to produce 
two of his pieces here and to play at 
the Coliseum for two weeks with his 
wife (Ethelynn Clark), but cancelled 
the Coliseum engagement. 




_< ENGLISH SPEEDING UP. 

.-..'" .. London, Aug. 6\_ 

Margaret Bannerman and Patrick' 

Somerset, who are playing leads in 

"Three Wise Fools," were married 

Aug. 2. 
They first met at rehearsals six weeks 

ago..... '.-.._ 

"GOING UP" GOING OUT. * 

London, Aug. 6. 
"Going Up" will be withdrawn *rt the 
Gaiety Aug. IS. - N 

SENNETT GIRLS IN ACT. 

Chicago, Aug. 6. 

"Yankee Doodle in Berlin," with the 
ten diving girls, at present playing at 
the Zeigfeld (picture house) will play 
two weeks in vaudeville before leav- 
ing Chicago. "" 

The film and girls will appear at Mc- 
Viekers' and the Rialto. . . 

The film plaved to $9,000 the opening 
week here. The attraction is booked 
al the Zeigfeld for five weeks. 



PATRICOIAS "BIG" APPEARANCE. 
._-:.- Chicago, Aug. 6. 

Patncola plays the Majestic next 
week, featured on the big time bill at 
this big vaudeville house for the first 
time since she has played on any stage. 

It was Patricola's crowning desire 
to show at the Majestic. She has ap- 
peared at. the big time theatres of New 
York and other cities, but wanted the 
chance at what is really her home 
town^ since Patricola made her name 
in this city as its star cabaret enter- 
tainer before going into vaudeville. 

» T NONETTE STARRING.^ 

• Nonette, the Gypsy Violiniste, who 
attracted attention in Hammerstein's 
"Some Time," her first production 
work,' is to be starred in a musical 
comedy written by Alonzo Price, who 
was responsible for the Hammerstein 
show. • 

Before taking up production playing, 
Nonette was a featured attraction in 
vaudeville^ She may reappear in the 
twice daily pending preparation for the 
new piece. \ •' - -, 



"Latent Craie" Cost Backer $10,000. 
i London, Aug. 6. 

"The Latest Craze" closed at the 



LAUUEL LEE 



Known as "The Chummy Chatterer" in vau- 
deville. Pictured nhovc, Miss Lee is disguised, 
even to the smile. 

The picture was token in the west, probnbly 
this summer, mid it is of Miss Lee herself, not 
one of the Scnnctt Bathing Beauties, as could 
he surmised after n Rood lork. 

Miss Lee is going to end her summer swim- 
ming with the ntw season. Shortly nftcr, Miss 
Lee will come enst. showing her new act 
■mind Hrondwnv. If It makes no difference 
in tlu> transportation charge, Laurel can bring 
her bathing suit nlong. 



Hicks Writes ".Respectable Farce." 
London, Aug. & 

Seymour Hicks has written a play 
called "Adam and Eve." Itls described 
as a respectable farce. He intends 
touring in it with a strong company. 

Tylmer Maud. Escapes from Russia. 

London, Aug. 6. 
Tylmer Maud, who translated Count 
Leo Tolstoy's plays into English, has 
finally escaped from a Russian Bolshe- 
vist prison after many months there. 

Mrs. ErroII is Back in London. 

_ London, Aug, 6. 

Mrs. Leon Erroll, who left a few 
weeks ago for her home in the States, 
returned here on the Aquitania. 



HOUDINI'S AIR STUNTS. 

Just back from Hollywood, Cal., 
Harry Houdihi is about recovered from 
a broken arnv sustained while making 
a plane-to-plane jump 3,000 feet above 
the ground. 

The aerial feat was done by Houdini 
for the benefit of "The Grim Game," 
the feature film he made while out 
there. 



Petrova's Third Return In Summer. 
Atlantic City, Aug. 6. 
For the third time during the sum- 
mer season of Keith's here, 01g*a Pe- 
trow' will appear as the headliner. 
Her next date of engagement at the 
house is Sept. 1. 

Keith's opened for the snsasaer in 
June. 




' \N ■ ' 5 ... .. 



JACK DEMPSEY HEADS SHOW 
TO TOUR AT $15,000 WEEKLY 

Linick and Jacoby Get Champion at That Price For Fifteen 

Weeks. Option of Renewal. With Seven Other Acts 

and Pictures Pugilist Opens in St. Louis 

;'] August 18. To Continue on 

K. & E. Time. 



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Chicago, Aug. 6. 

Linick & Jacoby in conjunction with 
Jones, Linick & Schaeffer, have en- 
gaged Jack Dempsey at $15,000 weekly 
for 15 weeks, with an option for 15 
more weeks.' A certified check on a 
local bank for the entire amount of 
the salary has been posted. 

Dempsey will start out at the head 
of a show comprising seven vaudeville 
acts with film flashes of Dempsey, Wil- 
lard, Kearns and scenes from the Tol- 
edo fight 

The show opens at Forrest Park 
Highlands, St. Louis, Aug. 18, and is 
guaranteed $25,000 for that week. It 
then starts a Kiaw & Erlanger route 
at a $2 scale, playing Colonial, Chicago, 
Forrest, Philadelphia, and K. & E. week 
stands in each of 15 major cities. 

Barney Lichten stein engineered the 
deal. Ned Holmes will manage the 
show. Litchtenstein and Danna Hayes 
will go ahead. Ralph Kettering and 
Ben Garretson will handle the publicity 
from Chicago. 

LIGHTS REFUNDED MONET. 

The Lights Club cruise met with 
disaster at Plainfield the latter part 
of last week when at the matinee the 
audience arose and demanded its mon- 
ey back because the show was. not 
given as advertised, several of the big 
names preferring to stay at home. 

The treasurer refunded over $300. 
At the night show in the same town 
the show played to capacity with all 
the headline acts present • 



longer. The couple were wedded by 
Recorder Adolph C. Carsten in Ho- 
boken,'-- 



TOT QUALTERS WITH HUSSEY. 

Tot Quakers will replace Flo Lewis 
when the latter leaves the Jimmy Hus- 
sey act. Miss Lewis and Jay Gould 
will go into the Herman Timberg 
"Chicken Chow Mein" act. Clark and 
Bergman were previously reported en- 
gaged for it. 

The withdrawal of Miss Lewis 
caused Hussey to appeal to the V. M. 
P. A. on the grounds that her ward- 
robe outlay would have to stand as a 
loss to Hussey. The V. M. P. A, ruled . 
that as Miss Lewis had given her two 
weeks' notice as required and was 
willing to pay tor the cleaning of the 
wardrobe, she was acting within her 
rights. i 

Change in Bowman and Sham Act. 

Jimmy Shea, formerly of Corporal 
Shea and Sergeant Bowman, has 
teamed with Catherine Nelson, a for- 
mer "Follies" girl. Bowman has re- 
tired from the stage and will enter 
mercantile business. 



Johnny Dooley for Comic Films Only. 

It is reported Johnny Dooley has 
given two weeks' notice to Ziegfeld 
"Follies" and will devote his future 
time to comedy pictures. 

He recently invaded the picture field 
and was the featured comic in a two- 
reel comedy. 



Trixie Friganza Settle* in Clendale. 

.' a' v Los Angeles, Aug. 6. 

itgfero Friganza has bought a home 
in Glendale, near here, and Marjorie 
Rambeau has also decided to make her 
future home there. 

Bric*-Morrf»ey Marriage! Verified. 



WACO -CUTTING." 

Chicago, Aug. 6. 

Reports from acts playing Pant ages 
bookings say that when they arrive at 
Waco, Charles Hodkins* time, but book- 
ing under. Pantages contracts, they are 
advised without previous notice they 
either play at. 20 per cent, cut in salary 
or not at all. They are then but a 
short time from the end of the Pan 
route, playing Houston and Dallas 
after Waco. 

Another bad case of cutting on the 
Pan time direct is reported at Denver, 
where the Pantages shows are. now 
appearing. at the Empress. The cut 
there is said to be 25 per cent., but 
that is a cut town on the route. Acts 
are asked to cot under the belief they 
are to appear at the Tabor-Grand, 
Denver. 



Two Acts Out of One. 

The act known as the "Twelve Tally- 
Ho Girls" has been divided into two 
turns, each called the Six Royal Hus- 
sars. One of the sextets will work 
west, the other being brought east. 
The original turn was considered too 
unwieldy to handle. 



LIBERTY THEATRE TIME. 

As stated in VARiarrr some weeks ago, 
the Liberty Theatre Division opened 
its own booking office in the New 
York, theatre building on Monday With 
J. R. Banta in charge of the routing. 

The office force has been strength- 
ened. John A. Miller, formerly of 
Camp Merritt. is assistant to Mr. Ban- 
ta, Jules H. Rhody transportation man- 
ager and John A Martin in charge of 
baggage. The office has started book- 
ink its hills direct, salaries being paid 
by each Liberty theatre manager after 
a date is played and all transportation 
and baggage charges being assumed by 
the new government booking office. 

The Liberty 1 Theatre Division is 
starting off with four and a half weeks 
of time,, but this is expected to grad- 
ually expand, for a number of canton- 
ments now closed are to be reopened 
as permanent posts for the training 
of the peace time army. These camps 
will extend as far west as Rockford, 
111., which will probably be the finish- 
ing point of the Liberty Circuit. Book- 
ing arrangements, however, will call 
for return transportation to New York. 
When the camps will have started up 
•the Liberty Circuit will offer a route 
of 13 weeks, that to be extended to 
about 20 weeks when the new theatres 
along the Mexican border are com- 
pleted ■;-•£.;. \\ [..;•' 

LOEW OFFICE SHIFTS. 

M. S. Epstin is retiring from the 
Loew offices along with Joseph 
Schenckj with whom he will continue 
to be associated in pictures. - -!■ 

Jake Lubin succeeds Mr. Schenck as. 
director of Loew bookings, Moe 
Schenck taking up the routine handled 
by Mr. Lubin. . . 

Dorothy Oberreuter, private secre- 
tary to Mr. Schenck for a number of 
years in the Loew office, will continue 
in the same capacity with him. 

Moe Schenck will move .into Jake 
Lubin's office in the Loew office and 
the latter will migrate to Joe Schenck's 
former headquarters. 




(Copyright HLxon-Connellj, K. C. 1U1S.) 



HERBERT CLIFTON 



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EXTENDING A. & H. TIME EAST. 

San Francisco, Aug. & s; . 
- The Finkelstein & Reuben and Al- 
lardt houses will be included in the 
Ackerman & Harris Western route 
with the beginning of the season. 

St. Paul will be the opening point, 
then as follows, Minneapolis, Supe- 
rior, Duluth, Virginia, Ft. Williams, 
Winnipeg, Crookston, Grand Forks, 
Fargo, Tlillings, with the Northwest 
and California in. order and returning 
East the time will include Salt Lake 
City, Denver, Cheyenne, Omaha, Kan- 
sas City, St. Louis and some Southern 
dates. 

The ' route will comprise about 14 
weeks, made up mostly of split weeks. 
some two day. stands, and few full 
weeks.. ■'■•'■•.':" . ,v>* 

Tommy Burchill will have charge pf 
the bookings. r 

Rebuilding Garden, Kansas City. 
Kansas City, Aug, 6. 

The Garden is being practically -re- l - 
built by the Marcus Loew Circuit. The 
house will be built up from the bare 
walls, giving a capacity of around 2,200. 
The cost will reach $150,000. 

One of the local papers carried #'V" 
detailed story concerning the Loew- K 
Pantages litigation over the Empress;. 
The case is to come up in the early sj 
fall. Loew has possession at present : 

Alexander Pantages has started a, 'v 
suit for $125205 for alleged breach of ; ' 
contract against the S. A. Lynch The:; 
atrical Enterprises, The Donally-Trim> 
mins Amusement Co., the Loew Sy- 
racuse Theatre Co., and Marcus Loew. 
The suit grew out of a battle between 
Pantages and the Loew interests, 
whereby Pantages was unable to play 
acts in Kansas City. 

Pantages alleges in his petition that . 
he contracted with the Donally Co., 
July 17, 1916, to show Pan road shows 
in Kansas City' for a period of 30 \ 
years. . The firm sold out to the Lynch 
Enterprises in 1918 and the new pur- 
chaser sold to the Loew Syracuse Co, 

The petition further alleges that be- 
fore Pantages was notified of the final 
sale the Loew interests leased the Gar- '••';• 
den Theatre/ the only vacant house in 
Kansas City, thus preventing Pantages 
from operating in the town at all. 

The odd figures result f rons Pan- >; ■:• v 
tages' allegation that he lost book- ^ 
ings for 1,433 weeks and his commis- * 
sion of five per cent, would amount to. . j. 
the figure asked in the suit. 

Both Pantages and Loew are mem- 
bers of the Vaudeville Managers' Pr©?; 
tective Association.' ! ■ ' 



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CURB BROKING PARTNERSHIP. 

Allan Coogan (Mullen and Coogan) 
and Johnny O'Brien (Moore, O'Brien 
and Cormack) will form a partnership 
for . operations . on the Curb (down- 
town). Both have been going it alone 
and claim, Bernard. Burk, Maurice 
Rose, Max Spiegel, Jenie Jacobs, and 
Aaron Kessler have been greatly en- 
riched by listening to their advice 
about a certain tire stock. 



Morrison Going with Hodgdon. . 

Charles Morrison, who has been as- 
sisting Carlton Hoagland in the opera- 
tion of Henderson's, Coney Island, this 
summer, starts Monday next with the 
Ray Hodgdon office. 

Before entering the Navy, Morrison 
was with Edw. S. Keller. 



Jasz Band and Dance Concert Nightly., 
Henry San try of Detroit is recruit- 
ing a Naval Jazz Band in New York 
to tour the south and Michigan. 

He plans to play small towns giv- 
ing a nightly concert with a dance to 
follow. 



•:,■:■» 



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The reoorted marrh'ffe'of Elizabeth /» TH 5P I ? ■NGAGHMBNT thla asMon at B. F. KEITH'S TkLkCM, NHW TORE, tils wetk 
in* repprieo marriage Oi CliEaDetn (Au . 4) ^ an entirely new «ct. Presenting bJ# 1*30 •barMrteriiuT creation* ntxt to eloslns. 
Br** to WUl JAwnsjjr W » rejJOjt 90 Fersowd lunervfeloii, MAX fiOJWOH, •» «» *"? u# 




SAM 



(THIS IS NOT A TACK POWOKS) 



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VARIETY 



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P. DODD ACKERMAN 
Fretldent 



MILTON ABORN 
Secretary 



SARGENT ABORN 
Treasurer 



A. I A. PRODUCING CO. *. 



1441 BROADWAY 






4- 



PHONE: BRYANT 8989 



HERE IS ANOTHER NOVELTY AND A TREMENDOUS HIT 

' ' A SPECULATION IN SPECS . 

"THE MAGIC GLASSES'' 



By FRANCES NORDSTROM 



Stag-td by WILLIAM PINKHAM 



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I 



OPENING SEPTEMBER 8 

"ONE CENT SALE" 

B ook bv 

ROBERT HARRIS md M. G. MICHAEL8 

Hollo by LEE DAVID 

With II P»ple ' 

Beautifully Staged and 

Mi(nl(lo«(it Coetumee 



• • 



>\ 



BUBBLES" 



With CARLOS SEBASTIAN 

HYRA OLGA and Arthur Anderion 

DANCE FANTASY IN FOUR GUTTERING SCENES 

AUG. 18,. MARYLAND. BALTIMORE: 25. KEITH'S, WASHINGTON 



A TWENTIETH CENTURY 

JAZZ COMEDY 
Written is Rhyme and 

Played la R*I Tin* ' 

"On the Ragged Edge 

. By FRANCES NORDSTROM 

Staged by WILLIAM PINKHAM 



»» 



AUTHORS AND COMPOSERS ARE' rNVITED TO SUBMIT ACTS WORTHY OF THE BEST IN VAUDEVILLE 
ALL PRODUCTIONS DESIGNED AND PAINTED BY P. DODD ACKERMAN STUDIOS 






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♦ 



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Booking over* seventy-fire first-class vaudeville 
theatres aha sixty houses playing tabloids in 
Now York, Ohio, W. Va, Peana* Ky„ Ind. and 
contingent States. 



Aeta Gelis Eart er Wert. 
Harlas a We* Om- Win, 
Write. -Phone-The SaHue- 
field one*. 




ACTS CAN 

BOOK OIRECT BY 

ADDRESSING ABOVE 



0U8 8UN 

PrealdeDt 
HOMER H. NEER 
Bueutiiw Mauarer 
WAYNE CHRISTY 

Tv lorn- 

ABMdets 

Sub Tt raue BIJj. 
SPHmOFEBLD, 0. 



PETE MACK 
Palaoe Theatre Bids, 

tarn york art 

TOM POWELL 

Slate-Lake Theatre Bids. 

CHICAGO. ILL 

J. W. T00D 

C. S. SAflOENT 
T£8 Brisbane Bid* 
BOBTAJU), N. I. 
HOWARD ROYER 

108 ApoUo Bids. 
PITTSBURGH. PA. 



8 to 16 
Weeks firm. 



CONTRACTS FOR 
FRANCE 



Nothing too 
big!!! 



APPLY TO 



HUGHES RYNER 



Ezclosive Booking Manager for 

CH. DEBRAY'S HALLS. 
NOUVEAU CIRQUE, PARIS 



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* 






The Hagenbeck- Wallace Clrcua will be here 

21-22, the second circus of the season. 



W. A. Calkins, tor several yean local man- 
ager for Pathe, has resigned that position and 
baa accepted the management of the Salt Lake 
City exchange tor the First National Exhibi- 
tors' Circuit, succeeding A B. Knox, who will 
go to the Pacific Coast. 

Gloria Mayne, who has been appearing In 
character songs at Saltair, has been billed for 
dally appearances at -the American. She will 
sing Indian songs in native tongue and cos- 
tume next week. 



John B. Ashton, of Frovo, Just outside of Salt 
Lake City, has booked Pantages' vaudeville for 
the Provo Theatre tor Wednesday nights and 
the Ackennaa & Harris Circuit for Friday 
nights. 



Private Peat has purchased the property near 
Port Townsend known as Arcadia, and will 
"make his future home there as soon as he com- 
pletes his present tour Of the Chautauqua cir- 
cuit. • - 



I 



SEATTLE 



^ 



J. B. Qllmour has been appointed as Salt 
Lake representative for W. W. Hodklnton. 
He will be attached to the Pathe office, which 
distributes Hodkloaon pictures. * 

The a Ixteen-pleec orchestra at the American 
will be Increased to thirty musicians beginning 
Labor Day. Concern will be given at matinees, 
sb well as evening performances. 

Marjorle Rambeau, Salt Lake's favorite na- 
tive daughter, has been signed by Pathe. She 
will appear under the direction of Albert 
Capellanl. 



Coincident with the filing of copies of its 
articles of Incorporation in Utah, the Selznick 
Company, Jointly with the Select Pictures 
Corporation, opened an agency in Salt Lake 
last week. Robert A Braokett, formerly of 
the Seattle office, is the local manager. 



By WILBUR. 

MOORE. — Dark. Orpheum vaudeville season 
opens 24th. , 
■OAK. — Dark. Monte Carter Musical Comedy 
Co. will reopen here 31st, after six weeks' 
vacation. 

METROPOLITAN.— Ruth Chatterton In "The 
Merrle Month of May." Next, Henry Miller 
and Blanche Bates in "Mollere." 

PANTAOES.— Vaudeville. 

PALACE-HIP.— W. V. M. A. vaudeville. 

HIPPODROME.— Vaudeville, pictures and 
dancing. 

ORPHEUM.— Midsummer Folly Co., featur- 
ing Lew White and Ert Hunt, in "The Bath 
House Beauties." 

LYRIC. — Walter Owen's Burlesque. 

CLEMMER. — Madge Kennedy in "Daughter 
of Mine?' 

LITTLE.— "The Brand." with Robert McKIm, 
Russell Simpson and Kay Laurel In the major 
roles. •'-. - 

COLONIAL.— Pictures. 

MISSION.— Pictures. 

8TRAND.— Pictures. 

COLISEUM.— Pictures. 

LIBERTY.— Pictures. 

REX.— Pictures. 



The Foley & Burke shows are providing the 
carnival features of the Moose Lodge Carnival, 
which is being held at the 6th and Leaora 
showgrounds 12-16. 

The Seattle Union Theatre Co. has been In- 
corporated here with a capitalization of Jl,- 
500,000. T. H. Wagner, J. Harry Wygant.and 
"W. E. Murry are the persona named in the 
Incorporation papers. 

Henri Gressit, an Eastern theatrical man, Is 
here on a visit in the interests of Eastern 
producers. His reports of -Western conditions 
are said to be very, favorable. 

Helen Callahan, cashier of a picture the- 
- atre In Seaside, Ore., was held up by a masked 
man last Wednesday as she was making up 
the day's receipts. He secured ?140. getting 
one of the money sacks which she had in the 
cashier's cage at the time. v 

A meeting of the Northwest Exhibitors' Cir- 
cuit was held In Spokane, Aug. 6, to get a 
number of the eastern Washington, northern 
Idaho and Montana exhlBlton to Join the cir- 
cuit for mutual benefits. James Clemmer, of 
the Clemmer Theatre, this city, president of 



. CHORUS GIRLS 

SEE BOYER 

320 Knickerbocker Theatre Bids. — II AM. tot P. M. 

the circuit, was chairman of the meeting held 
In Spokane. About 78 exhibitors belong to the 
N. W. B. C, and the additional members se- 
cured at the recent Spokane meeting swells 
this list to over a hundred. 




I 



For the beneflt of the Mother Ryther Chil- 
dren's Home, this city, a unique concert was 
held at F. W. Zimmerman's fairyland opera 
house, "Under the Firs," on the shores of Lake 
Washington. Claude Madden, Mr. Zimmerman, 
Gwendolyn Taylor Lewie, Arvllle Beletead, Mrs. 
Clinton McCormack, William Kuehl, Lucy 
Smith WUloughby, Annie Louise Herold and 
other Seattle artists were on the program, 
•^— — i 

"A Romance of Seattle" Is being filmed In 
this city this week by the Hudrls Film Com- 
pany, New York. Walter Stelner Is directing 
and Beverly B. Dohbs Is doing the camera 
work. About five hundred men, women and 
children were on hand at the try-out to urge 
their charms for stellar honors. The cast 1b 
made up of Seattle people In its entirety. Miss 
Eilene Towne was chosen as leading lady. 
John J. Sullivan, former U. 8. District Attor- 
ney, won out as leading man.' - 

The Vatican Chorus, direct from Rome, will 
give a concert In this city during their tour 
of the United States. 






m 



DROPS AND FULL STAGE SETTINGS 

We offer for reat or tale brand new setttno and dress in the latest 
and moat gorgeooa eValS&M painted dreperiee. 
■as w.f — — t. m -w — « _ w . » m .w -w __ » — — im new aeta and Mia*. Let na ratal t same for your approvaL 

BEAUMONT VELVET AND PAINTED SCENERY^TUMO <v. lewis, Mgr.) - 

245 West 46th Street, New York City. Phone Bryant 9448 



SOMETHING NEW IN SCENERY 



Oar BMW factory AM* artists are at year service 






. 



i. 



Eight Months 

with the 

Boys of the A. E. F. 



BESSIE LEONARD 

and EDDIE PORRAY at the Piano 

I Many thanks to Capt. Hunter for his London offer 

PERMANENT ADDRESS, 181 COVE ST., NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



DOUGHBOY 
GIRL" 



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4 - 




VARIETY 



THREE SMASHING SENSATIONAL SUCCESSES 



B&B | 



DEA 
LITT 



And why not? It's 
a n o t h e r o f th oit 
wonderful and unusual 



BALL AND 

BRENNAN 



O IN A BALLAD IWI EANS PER FECTION 
THIS SONO IS EVEN MO F*E TpH AN TM AT 




ERNEST 



While the 
lyric by 



J.KEIRN BRENNAN 



is intensely dram- 
atic and appealing 



BALL 



melodies that mad* 
this well- k nown com- 
poser world famous 



A REAL SONG FOR REAL SINGERS 




. 





(ON THE ROAD TO 



LAN© 



By j.keir^ 

ANOTHER BIO SON © HIT ■_■ ■'A V 1 \ BST >1 Ci K 



ANOTHER BIO SONQ MIT U A V/ F A C M 

By the Writers of ' _■ ■'.-■. J^^%> ■■■ -. ~-*w - , : .»mmm jtp^^k. , taaanaP I w. ■.-;■. Itn— .mh 

A TSI situ ral Dbuble For T "° B ^^' Jom^ 1 "' ° r 



a Boys, Two Olrl 
O o;y ai o d O I r I; 




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By GLYDErHTXCER and WALTER 

"MOTHER "song of the present time. A beautiful, sympathetic waltz melody, and a lyric 
that is bound to reach the heart of every man, woman and child Tn your audience 



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TAKE 



OOPIESAN O^ 



OF OUR 



I N A/UL- KEVS 
-T O - O O A ST SE « V ICE 



AL. BROWNE 
Saa Fnnciiea. Cil. 
508 Pentai" »«• 

GABE NATHAN 

L«t A neelu, Cil 
Si pert a Thntn Biff. 



THOS. J. QUICIEV 

Chicago. Ill 
Cirrkk Tkutrt Eldg. 

JACK CROWLEY 
Providence. R. I. i 
18 Bellow St. 



ED. EDWARDS 
Philadelphia. Pa 
35 So. Ninth St 

JlS. L. MANN 

Denier. Col. 
420 Birth Block 



JACK LAHEV 

BMten, Hiu 
21o Trmont SI. 

HAL M KING 
Kaaiu City, at*. 

Gaiety Theatre Bide 




AL. COOK. 16€ Broadway, New York 

(Next to r-alaoo Thootra) 



H. ROSS K(Ctr 

SI. Pail. Mm» 

Eauarlf ■ Mtetaatllt to. 

BARNEY HAGAN 

Seattle. Walk. 
SOO HMttllM VH 



Al WORTH 
tlnal nl t 

4tk 4 PiMntt St* 



BRYANT N TREUMO 
PltllHrih. Pa 
347 51k Att 



SYDNEY KLEIN BILLV NALlET 

29 Wkltcwri Acii SI. Uili. Ho 

tail Utt) Ctt». Utah 421 NollMi Ilia. 



CDC HOWARD 
, Cincinnati. Ohio 
621 Main SI 

mike McCarthy 

Minncaeotit, Mlaa. 
217 PaataaM 8ldi - 



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It -Ki 



■ -tldei ' 



'■■'■' • '■■^■-.'. ".'.""■, .■■■:.%-■. r-;---/.--..-- .:.- .• ■;•;'•:■-..::::■■'.• •'.. ■■■■■■,..■■.■■■■■■■-..■.■ ■/ I .■•-■■■:•.. '■ .- >-Y : ' - 

70 VatM-lTY 



■■ '• ■ 



i 

■ 



1.' 



E. P. ALBEE, President 



J. J. MURDOCH, General Manager 



F. F. PROCTOR, Vfee-Presldtnt 



B. F. Keith's Vaudeville Exchange 



B. F. KEITH 



I l AGENCY] 

(Palace Theatre Building, New York) 

EDWARD P. ALBEE A. PAUL KEITH 

Founders | 

Artists can book direct by addressing S. K. HODGDON 






P. P, PROCTOR 



Marcus Loew's 




nses 



General Executive Offices 
Putnam Building, Tunes Square 
New York 

JOSEPH M, SCHENCK 

General Manager 

J.H. LUBIN 

Booking Manager 

Mr, Lubin Personally Interviews Artiste Daily 
Between 11 and 1 

Acts laying off in Southern territory wire NT. Y. Office 

CHICAGO OFFICE 
North American Building 

J. C. MATTHEWS in charge 



ARTHBR J. HORWITZ-LEE KRADSJnc. 



CHICAGO BOOKING MEW TORE 

Sttaiffet EAST AND WEST SfESJfe 

Acta desiring immediate and consecutive bookings communicate. 



BERT LEVEY CIRCUIT 
VAUDEVILLE THEATRES 

ALCAZAR THEATRE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



FULLER'S Australian 
and N. Z. Vaudeville 

GtvtmJna Dlrvttsr: BEN J. FULLER 
BOOKINGS ARRANGED 
F»r all Mffinai ftwj ta lYeaalsee aad Taaast 



Ageatst / 
III* : 



Wsitira Vaudevlll* Mars.' Asaa,, Ch!c«l» 



Corporation Couoael Walter F. Meier la pre- 
paring a city ordinance whereby the Seattle 
Board of Theatre Censors will have authority 
to suppress all false advertising In connection 
with vaudeville, notion picture and legitimate 
theatres. This also Includes lobby displays. 



Miss Margaret Pettlt, a local dancer, left 
Monday for New York City to continue her 
studies with Kosloff and other masters of 
terplschcm 



B. S. MOSS 

Theatri cal Ente rprises 

AMALGAMATED ■ 

VAUDEVILLE AGENCY 

M. D. SIMMONS, General Booking Manager 

. General Executive Offices 
110-112-114 WEST FORTY-SECOND ST. 



Phone, Bryant 92M 



, umi r- n a 



. . : . v . • .; . . . . - , .■ 

Feiber&SHea 



1493 Broadway 

(Putnam Building) 

New York City 



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SZSSE 



The Western Vaudeville 
Managers' Association 

HOST SINGER, General Manager TOM CARMODY, Booking Manager 

5th Floor State-Lake Theatre Bldg. CHICAGO, ILL. 



Harry Rickard s Tivoli Theatres, auWu 

HUGH D. McINTOSH, Governor Director 

Resist** Ctatf AMrass: "HUQHHAO," aytfaw Head •fflss: TIVOLI THIATHR, Sydav, Aa«baRa 
American mepreaentative, NORMAN JEFFERIES Real Mate Trail lid,. Filladatela 



•',*i ' •- ' . • ■ .. : - , . : . •■'.:■'*"■■, ss ill 



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ALLEN & BETTY 

LEIBER 



In the Comedy Classic 



»> 



"Breaking It Gently' 

A full stage comedy farce 
jrith an entirely original 

theme. 



Three 

■ • ■ 

Killarney Girls 



»«* 



| YOUTH, BEAUTY, PERSONALITY 
IN HAPPY HARMONY '.;■' 



: * 



VARIITY 

-I. ' i ' ■' ■ ! " » 

RNEST M. JACOB 

MD COMPANY 

IN THE PRESENTMENT OF. 

Him Thoughts" 

• Musical Skit In On* 

OUGHBREDS THAT fl 

ASK JUDGE LBASON 



a 





FOUR VENETIAN 
SERENADERS 

AN INNOVATION IN 
INSTRUMENTATION 



:■■■ -•'.••:.'v>v I 



■ifitt 



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SB 









I 



UNIVERSITY 
TRIO 

THOSE SINGING CHAPS 

L*W fwtarw of "Peek-a-Boo," opwiin* tfa* 
:yB. F. Krith tour Atgiit » ■;'■./■"..: Kg. 



ffi&B 



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A WESTERN 
PRODUCER 
THAT WILL 

^SHORTLY INVADE 
THE EAST 
WITH GIRL 
ACTS AND 

foUSICAL TABLOIDS 

Write, Wire, Phone 

Permanent Address 

springfield, 
ohio 

NEW YORK OFFICE: 

^HUGHES & LEASON 



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Gent 






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FORMERLY 



• ■•■■:.- • x ' i ; \ •■■yi : -W- '. . ■ • . * * .. 



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General Booking Manager of the 

JUN CIRCUIT 



Now a member of the mew firm of 



GENE HUGHES Inc. and RAY H. LEASON 

, Managers and Promoters of Vaudeville Acts ' . ■•' 

SUITE 1004, PALACE THEATRE, NEW YORK CITY 

PHONE BRYANT 8698-8699 



■ ' ",.■• .. ■ l •.. 







"G6GET»EM" 



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THE DANCING 



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A RIOT IN 



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BLACK— 

THE KING OF 

JAZZ 

DANCING 



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Will offer soon their latest Bicycle 



C 



THE ORIGINAL • 

OXFORD TRIO 



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Diversion 

Watch for New York Opening 



SIX 

SERENADERS 

A CYCLE OP 

SONG AND 

MUSIC 



DELBRIDGE 

AND 

GREMMER 

CLASS IN 

SONG AND 

STORY 






SMITH &KEEFE 

TWO BOYS AND 



A PIANO 



■?*mB> 



AN ACT THAT ALWAYS ENTERTAINS 



PATCH 



h 



AND 



r DALY 

EVERYTHING 
IN ONE 



DOLLY 

AND 

CALAME 

Nifty Dancers 

and 

Clever Funedians 



ARTHUR 
BROWNING 

PRESENTS 

YANK 

The Wonder Dog 

Any Spot— Any Bill 



DALY'S 

TANGLED 

ARMY 

AN ABSURDITY 
IN ACROBATICS 



t : 



THE 
PHANTOS 

MUSIC 
MIRTH 
MAGIC 



THE 
MARTIANS 

FUN ON 

THE PLANET 

MARS 



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\ . $i ' _^r:-:-,. ....__ ' 



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VARIETY 



/-. 






I. MILLER 

1 SHOP & 



M&r/Mcrt/iftem 



isr/or 

OHIO. 



we nil 



mm 



also iwvmal mm 

mrui mm stage niQummcNT , 



NEW VORK 1554 BrmoWaV;., W--5f: 
CHICAGO SiArc. A'MoNf-fj£. '.is. 



Guerrini & Co. 

Accordion 
Factory 

la tt» uarted ma _ 
me only Mar that makes 
any eet of Beeds. aw* by 
bent 

277-271 Colomboe Ave 
Sen Francisco. CeL 




Beautify Your Face 

Yoo mutt look seed to make oood. Has* 
of the "ProWon" tin obtained aid 
retained setter parte i>» navies ave «or. 

root tftelr fattural l«pertoetloBS m n- 
move blemhhee. Comullitlon frit. fees 
rWMBUl*. 

F. E. SMITH, M.D. 
347 Fifth Avenne, N. T. C. 
(Opp. Waldorf) 



REDUCE YOUR BUST 

or erthtr FAT t to 4 saokae wtth ONE MR of OOffl 
0BEB1TT CIUUM. aUleroaJ. Atwluto I"™*** 

n«<t<iwt fat on w part of the body. Tjo ateuni. 

•tarrlaf . «nroUlo« mr taJdnt daaeorooj dnp. Bar* 
U* ooiah mure. For aen and women. . Prlea 



BaKfe? 



- . 10* CUR HIE A CU 
Aveni» a. Breeklyo. H. Y 




THEATRICAL COSTUMES 

Evening Gowns— Street Costumes 
Lingerie and Hats 

SKETCHES FURNISHED 

36 West Randolph St. CHICAGO, ILL. 

Pbonas Randolph 1721 



HAZEL RENE 



HATS GOWNS COSTUMES 



386-308 8t*te-Lake Building Chicago. 

IBENE DUBUQUE) Formerly with 
HAIEL EANOUBj Edith Strickland 



Tel: Cant 1899 



ARE YOU GOING TO EUROPE? 

Btearaebtp Acesmmodatloiu arranged an all Una*, at Mala Office Prices. Beats art jolna 

very full j arrange early. Foreign Money beejht end a old. liberty Honda bouaht and sold. 

PAUL TATJBIG A SON, 1M Rut 14th St,. Maw Te*k. Phanat Stayresant «13l-«137. 



Prindpals, Act*, Chorus Girls <* 30 to **» "<***> 

For New York productions, road shows and cabarets. 

See LILLIAN BRADLEY, Suite 536, Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg, 

116 Weet 89th St.— Phone: Greeley 1613 



SCENERY 

OF ALL KINDS- FOB ALL OCCASION* 

American Velvet Scenic Stndio 

407 Gaiety Tlteatro Wits. New York . 

Pirate; Arrest MM 
B. A. PRICK, Manager '. 



Phone: Bryant WAS 

HARRY WOODLE 

Buy*— Sella— Batlda . « 

At Sol Wert 47th Street, New York City 
EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 

Kor DRAMATia MtJHICal*. BUKLBSOpS. 

VAUDHVIIJJi, CABAIUTf, MOYIKQ 

riCTURBB. STOCK and 

STAGE LIGHTING 



New Catalog of 

Ho If Profeaaioaal 
OC aft Trunks 

NOW READY 
14 Sties $46.06 to 18Mt 

Herkert & Meisel 
Trunk Co. 

918 Washington Ave, St. Uols 

CHICAGO AGENT 

BARNES TRUNK WORKS 

117 8. Dearborn St 




WIGS 



For Women 

Direct from Manufacturer 

Made to your own measurement of natural Human Hais— straight, 
wavy or crimpy, as desired. Can be combed and dressed the same as 
your own hair. Can also be worn for street wear. 
I always have on hand 400 to 500 wigs in standard colors and sizes 
and can All rush orders immediately. 
Alia complete Una of Switcher, Tranrtorinatlone, Carta, ate. Call tad see then. 
Free Catalog tent to out-of-town patron*. 

ALEX. MARKS, 662 W. 8th Ave., at 42nd St, N. Y. 

Open Dally— 9 to P. M. (Closed Saturday*) 



CORRESPONDENTS WANTED 

VARIETY wants correspondents, newspaper men preferred 

Address VARIETY, New York 



GORRINGE'S 

toot 



Shipping and American 
News Agency, Ltd., 
17* Green St, Leicester Sq., W. C. 2, London 

Phonei Garrard 7417 Cable: Frankoge, London 

Artlatril Don't forfet Frank. Pi up or L, PaSMures. 

Peneaal Attention given te all who wlah to trnrri. 
Largest seleetten af American Parladlcala In London. 

TO CLIBNTR— I be* to take tbla opportunity of idttalai you that the pertnenhlp 
between Mr. w. B. Daw and myesif bavins boon Alesorred. X ant oarryinc on the 

budoeet formerly known aa DtWr Bteamaoip iran at the old addreea ae abore. 
The booklet of paetxee-opeolaJly thealrtoai-haiamge fonranDot. r*re of mall, 
•nd forotsn money exchange departmente will be otrrtod on aa emderuly aa hereto- 
fore. Toura falthrtilly. FRANK QORRWOSL 




Thank 



T WARDROBE «-• 
runkS 

ALL MAKES 
20% niscoant to tha Prafasslan 

KANT BABOAINa IN 81JOHTLT 
TJ8MD TBDNKS AND BA08 

PH. KOTLER 

170 SEVENTH AVE. NEW TORE 
(Bet. 4tta and 41st Bto.) 



George Relsner, theatrical magnate ot South 
Bend and Raymond, Wash., la building a new 
theatre in Raymond at a cost ot SBO/MO. It 
will be known as the Tokay. 

Shlmmle dancing will be barred In Port- 
land hereafter, according to Acting Mayor 
Blgolow, ot that olty. This will apply to the- 
atres and all public dance halls, it is under- 
stood. 



The Oak Is scheduled to reopen Aug. 8L In 
the meantime the house will undergo a thor- 
ough overhauling. 

SYRACUSE. 

By CHESTER B. BAHN. 

BMPIREl.— First part, dark; 22-23, Nell 
O'Brien's Minstrels. 

WIETING.— Dark. First booking Sept 1, 
with "The Unknown Purple." 

BASTABLD.— First half, opening ot the 
burlesque season, with "The. Hip, Hip Hooray 
Girls." Next weak, Drat half, "The Boa- 
tonlans." 

TEMPLE.— Vaudeville. 

CRESCENT— Vaudeville 

STRAND.— "The Firing Line," nrst part. 

ECKEL.— "The Avalanche," Brat part. 

SAVOY.— "The Veiled Adventure," first part. 

The Mack Bennett Bathing Girls will be the 
piece de resistance ot the "Syracuse Day" pro- 
gram at the New York State Fair Sept. 8, the 
State Fair Commission announced this week. 
The girls will bead a large delegation of film 
notables who will visit the fair as guests of 
the city. 

The Ben Hur vaudeville company will he 
known as the Variety Vaudeville Company, it 
was announced Tuesday. 

Announcement df the marriage of Elizabeth 
Griffin, one of the first Watertown profes- 
sional musicians to go overseas as an enter- 
tainer, to Capt. Wilbur Goodwin, of New York, 
was' made on Monday by the bride's mother. 
It came as a decided surprise to the young 
woman's friends, who assume that she met 
the officer while serving in France. 



Johnny Reynolds, erstwhile Army aviator, 
human fly .and athlete, and now in vaude- 
ville, lumped Into the limelight this week when 
he voluntered to don a divers outfit and search 
the bottom of Cayuga Lake at Ithaca for the 
body of Hazel Crance, Ithaca belle, for whose 
death in the lake on July 19 Donald W. 
Fother, Cornell atudent, of Los Angeles, Cal., 
Is under arrest on a first degree murder 
charge. Reynolds was playing In Ithaca at 
the time of the fatality. When Fether was 
arrested, Reynolds wired from Blmlra, offer- 
ing to explore the lake bottom for the girl's 
body and possible evidence. His offer was ac- 
cepted. Reynolds took two weeks' layoff, sent 
to Philadelphia for a diver'a outfit and will 
make the attempt lab* this week. 

Ithacans learned -for the drat time details 
of the death In battle of Corp. Michael F. 
Conway last week from Harry Howe, of 
Buffalo, a member of the "Parisian Whirl" 
company which played the Lyceum there. Ac- 
cording to Howe, Conway was killed east of 
Grand Pre on Nov. 1. He had been wounded 
earlier tn the day, but refused to go to the 
rear. 

The actors' strike hit Syracuse this week 
when Representative Francis P. Martin re- 
ceived wires from Manager M. E. Wolff an- 
nouncing the cancellation of 'The Acquittal" 
which was to open Its road season here next 
Monday, and "Going Dp," which was to bo 
the Empire's booking for State Fair Week. 
Both are Cohan ft Harris offerings. 



, ..'":■,• :; ■ 



Bernard Frank, for nearly two years treas- 
urer of the Wietlng, this week assumed the 
duties of house manager of the Wietlng for 
the Shuberts, succeeding James B. Barnes. Mr. 



James Madison's Address 

until Aug. Slat will be Flathon Buildlag, 
544 Market St., San Francisco. 

MY NEW YOBK OFFICE OPEN THE 
YEAR SOUND 




E.Ga!izi&Bro. 

G reatest Prgostfoaal 

turera cad Benaban, 
Inooap&ntAi SpMel 
Works. Row Ua 
Patented Shift Kara 

XfcL FmalUaSM 



WARDROBE PROP. 
TRUNKS, $5.00 

gig Bargains. Have been nsetL Alae a few 

fSSC H «« d .i5 , a7«* 11 JV 0d 5 br *. Wardrabs 

J?.™' "!• ,nd * 15 - A t9W «tra large Prop- 
erty Tranke, Al.o old Taylor and Sal TronkV 
Parlor Fleer, 28 West Slst 8t„ New Y.rk Cl£ 



EMPIRE 
SHOE SHOP 

707 EIGHTH AVE, AT 44th 8T. 
NEW YORK CUT 

Short Vamp Specialists 

We Fit Entire Companies V 

Mail orders given prompt attention 
Write /or Price List 



.■ . -...- 



BREAK YOUR, JUMP 

WrifeVICTORIAJIpfe 

ROCHI: .■". 1 I K '« :,i 

Ji.^fdueivSecv a hv* 



♦ COVERS FOR 
ORCHESTRATIONS 

ART nOOKmN'OINC; CO. 

• llil WrM 4 2 ml 'Street', N. V. i'. 



ARRANGING 

Our arranging hu to be 
kirsarlor tacrine wa dos't 
give It away. When yon are 
tired of thai kind, try aa 
orohertratlon with thlo itamp. 

L. L. VasBargh, Mat. 
MS Maty sue.. Now York Otty 



AT LIBERTY 




Does a good sketch require a young woman of espert- 
raoe, appearance, aWUty. medium helulit and welahtf 
If so. kindly answer H. Y., oare VAJUFTY, Now York 



Barnes will manage a road company this 
season. 

The Top Theatre, now being rushed to com- 
pletion here, will open on Ang. 28. "The Turn 
of (he Road" Is advertised as the first attrao- 
tlon. . • ~ 

O. H. Carlton, of Allentown, Pa., is sew 
house manager ot the Lyceum at Blmlra. Carl* 
ton has been in the theatrical game for 80 
years. The Lyceum opened last week with 
Gus Hill's Minstrels. 



Finis was written to "The AThltn Olty," which 
set out to be Syracuse's Joney Inland some 
dozen or more years ago, isst week, when the 
nlte of the amusement report was sold .to the. 
Solvay Process Co. The White City blossomed 
for one or two seasons, and then gave up the 
ghost. 

The Wietlng will open on Labor Day with 
"The Unknown Purple" as the attraction. For 
the week of Sept. 8— State Fair Week-rthe 
Wietlng will offer "The Lady In Red" 'and 
"Tumble Inn." These bookings arc, of course, 
dependent upon the actors' strike. 

The My rklo -Harder Stock moved from BIng- 



JACK L. LIPSHUTZ 



EVERY TUESDAY IN NEW YORK 

Note NEW PERMANENT ADDRESS, 162 West 43tb Street 

Behrens— Phone: Bryant 185 PHILADELPHIA— »I8 Walnut Street 



1 



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VARIETY 



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HARRY T. 



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'STEP LIVELY GIRLS" 

COLUMBIA THEATRE, (N. Y.) 

NEXT WEEK, (AUG. 25) 



• 



Si 









CALL 



BEN BERNARD 

Producer and Stage Director 

MANAGERS DESIRING DANCING 
t AND NOVELTY NUMBBRS 

WJttl Pt$ UM • POM». and MM *** Blrwtl«a 
Call, Write OK Wire 

PONTIAC HOTEL 
Slid Street ami Broadway, N. Y. C. 



$> 



hamton to Oewego thla week, holding forth at 
the Richardson la the latter city. 

The Armory, Blnghamton, had "The Midnight 
Maidens" as Its Initial burlesque offering for 
the season the first halt of this week. For 
the first time the Armory this year will have 
three-day stands of American Wheel offerings. 

The Empire will have Its first dramatic event 
on Aug. 25, when Rita Welman's "The Acquit- 
tal" la soheduled. The last half of the week. 
"Boys Will Be Boys" will be the attraction. 

There were new faces a-plenty on the house 
/staff of the Unstable when that house reopened 
this week. Manager Stephen Bastable's new 
list of attaches shows the return to the 
Baa table staff of two men after an absence of 
11 years. George Frailer, an old circus man- 
ager, long with Barnum & Bailey's, returns as 



IRVING M. COOPER 



ARTISTS' REPRESENTATIVE 

1416 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
JOE COOPER, Gen. Mgr. 



Phones Bryant 9 9728 



NEW YORK COSTUME CO. 

COSTUMES MANUFACTURERS IN WEST GOWNS 

187 N. WABASH AVE. CHICAGO CENTRAL 1801 



BLACKFACE COMEDIENNES 

SEE BOYER 

820 Knickerbocker Theatre Bldg.— II A. M. to S P. M. 



city. Her father is a member of the Van- 
couver Symphony Orchestra, and she also has 
two sisters who are musicians. . ■• 



■ : .- 



Lieut B. 0. HI u lam, who will write the book 
and lyrics for Ous Bdwards' new musical 
comedy, "The Film Q!ri," formerly resided 
here and produced several attraotloni at local 
houses. He organized "The Follies," which 
appeared at the Imperial Theatre here several 
seasons ago. 



I ;ui pli' - • i •> 1 1 • > i 



si •' :u K i itt i;i. 



I I'M.I W'.'Sl. 



WILL-JAM & LYK.ENS 



#|.V>0 I*. ;,;,..) v.. 



'J.i-':' ■ . N cvv .■>'• 



\ t • i> . ii.i ' ■ • ii't.i 



advertising agent. William Caron Is the other 
old-timer to return. ■ He resumes his place as 
electrician. Until recently Mr. Caron has been 
with the Eckel here. 




TBSAKSSCAL OUTFITTER 
W» Bttmdway New Tort City 



Trt. BRYANT 8191 



Dr. B. HUBER 

DHNT1ST 



cAHDLtfl «.oa. 

Rses) 401 



220 WEST 42 NO STREET 

N»tr TImn Bqeart 

NEW YORK 



Charles Kroetch, director at the Crescent last 
season, and before that time at the old Grand, 
Is the new orchestra leader. He succeeds 
Andrew Ooettel, Jr. Others engaged for the 
new season Include Austin DeVoe, veteran stage 
carpenter; Jack Smith, assistant carpenter; 
William Laun, property man ; Joseph Flaherty, 
fly man, and Peter Hanley, doorman. The re- 
appointment of Treasurer Samuel Rosenberg 
and Assistant Treasurer Abraham Epstein was 
announced last week, > 
/ 

VANCOUVER, CAN. 

_ By H. P. NEWBERRY. 

EMPRESS.— 11, Empress Stock Company 
presented Wlllard Mack's play, "Broadway ft 
Buttermilk," to the usual excellent business. 
18, "The TrapV» 

AVENUE. — Dark. Will have several road 
attractions In a few weeks. 

ROYAL.— 11, "Bolshevism on Trial," first 
time In city. This fllin was to have been 
shown ""at the Orpheum week of Aug. 4, but 
did not arrive In time. Has been well ad- 
vertised. 18, Naslmova in "War Brides." 

ORPHEUM.— 11, Nazlmova In "War Brides." 
'18, Opening of Orpheum vaudeville season, 



with Bossle Clayton and the Canalnou head- 
lining. 

PANTAGES.— Vaudeville with Joe Jackson 
headlining, 

COLUMBIA.— Hippodrome Circuit vaudeville 
and feature photoplays changed twice weekly. 
11-13, Fondelll Trio, headline. Rusticating 
Misses, Jack & Pearl Hall, MosBman A Vance, 
Miller ft King. Mary Miles Minter In "Byes 
of Julia Deep" and Leah Balrd In "Wolves of 
Culture" ^serial). 7 

REX.— Douglas Fairbanks In "The Knicker- 
bocker* Buokaroo." 

DOMINION.— Constance Talmadge in "Who 

C&T68 * 

GLOBE.— Marguerite Clark In "Come Out of 
tho Kitchen" and Pearl White In "The Light- 
ning Raider" (serial). 

COLONIAL..— Viola Dana In "Satan, «%" 
first half; Kitty Oordon feature film second 
half.' 

MAPLE LEAF.— Dustln Farnum In "?S-.e 
Light of Western Stars." 

BROADWAY.— First half, Mary Plckford In 
"Daddy Long Legs." Picture has already 
played a week at both the Hex and Dominion 
theatres. 



Geo. B. Howard, of the Empress, and Sirs. 



Why Run-down Pale 
Exhausted Women 
Should Take Iron 



"There can he no beauttfoJi 
healthy. rosy-chtekod, atoad? 
•trved woman without Iron. When 
the bra upas from the Mood cS 
-wonwnrthe toses go (rota their, , 
fheeks-thelr charm and attract. § 
Ivenasedeparl. I always insist tblt 
«rny patients take organic iron— a 
luxated Iron-(not metallic iron' V 
which often corrodes the itomaeh' * 



#1 



anddoei more harm than good};/' 
lntl« j/ 



Miss Polly Redfern, a local girl, will return 
here In a few weeks with George Kelly In "The 
Flattering World" at the local Orpheum. Miss 
Redfern before going to New York appeared 
In a number of amateur productions In this 



Nuxated Iron. Is eaeily auiw. 
lated, dou no* '.blacken nor in. . 
jure the lectin nor nptct the' 
stomach. It will increase the' 
slrength-and endurance of weak, 1 
nervous, irritable, careworn! 
nsfgsrd women in two wecltr, 
■time in many -cases. I have; 
uied it in my own practice 
-wiili moat surprising result*."-. 
Ferdinand Klng.M.D.. well known' 
New York Physician and medical 
author. (Satisfaction guaranteed! 
of money relundcd-On tile St all' 
4jood clniggisi»,>'" 



Nuxated Iron 



■ 11 



■ ■ 1 1 

pi 






■Mir, 

,.. ; .fif|'' I 



\: 



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■ §1 

.•.•'••■ ■:-;•:•. ■:■ 

■'-■■■■ 

.-. mm :,: 



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. Y '• 



Sp?£" 



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1 



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74 



V\ARI2TY 






BEST PLACES TO STOP AT 



LEONARD HICKS and HOTEL GRANT 



Madison and Dearborn Streets 



"The Keystone of Hotel Hospitality" 
Often Special Weekly Rates to the Profession 



CHICAGO 



500 Housekeeping Apartments 

(of the better class, within reach of economical folks) 

Under the direct supervision of the owners. Located In 4hs heart of the city, Juit 
off Broadway, close to all booking office*, principal theatres, department stores, traction 
lines, "I*" road and subway. ... 

Wo are the largest maintainors of housekeeping furnished apartments specialising 
to theatrical folki. We are on the ground dally. Tale alone Injures prompt lerrlee 
and cleanliness. 

ALL BUILDINGS EQUIPPED WITH STEAM HEAT AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS 



HILDONA COURT 



841 to 847 West 431* St. 
A MidlH ■• !"?«• Jurt oomileted: etentor 



Psoas: BiyaatUW 
lasjajejpgj slevstsr 



of ft* it. 



j UH fisae ttss. TTiess apartments embsdy awry iBXiry 
K $M.M Up Meaialy; 8IB.CO Up Weekly 

» YANDIS COURT 

241 -247 West «rd 8t. PHom: M 7912 

Ose, tare* e*s four roota aearteeats. with kit. 
shsss tl ss, prtvata lath aad tatsplwaas. The 
then ejMi insets are sotsd far is oa 
$12.00 Up Weakly 



HENRI COURT 

312. 3 14 and 3 LQ Wert 4*tn St Phone: Bryant MM 
Aa up-to-the-mlneta. new, fireproof tousles, er. 
rested la apart mant* at torso aa* fear mu with 
Mtthees tad prirnna hath. 'Phone la law apart* 
meet. 

$17.00 Up Weahly 

THE DUPLEX 

SB art 830 West 48rd St P*»ns: Brrs*t«283.«|jl 
Three aad rear races vitb bath, fa i s ta sis t> e 
degree of Rsedemaees that crass aaythlss la tali 
typs of balldlcg. Tfcsss ejartaests will sw — a s 
aatt fatr or bum adslta. 

J9.S9 Up V/oahly 



Address all common cations to M. daman 

Principal Office— Tandle Court, 341 West 43rd Street, New Yerk 

Apartments can be seen evcnlnjs. Offlco In caeb balldlng. 



One Block U Times B«aere 



"TTT Brya7t iU-iil-ltU 

The Edmonds Furnished Apartments 



MRS. aCORSk DANIEL, rYsertetreso 

Bpeslal' Ssassor Rate) fro» Jiae te 



• j WHS 

Ostatit ExslaWvely te the Pnfeeslm 

776-78-80 EIGHTH AVENUE 
Between 47th and 48th Streets 

™WE?i£3J2r' WW YOBE 



Office i '• 

77s EIGHTH AVENUE 



Fh«aet Bryant IS44 



Set. P. Schneider, Prep. 

FURNISHED 
APARTMENTS 



THE BERTHA 

Complete for Housekeeping— Clean sad Airy 

32S West 43rd Street, NEW YORK GOT 

Private Bath, 8-4 Beams. Catering to the comfort and eeavealeneo of the nrofasslia, 
Steam Heat and Electrle Light • - - - WAP Up 



Phone: Greeley S373-N74 MBS. BEILLY. Proprietress 

1, 1, 1 and 4 Booms, from iS.W per Weak Upwards— -Housekeeping Privileges 

MARION HOTEL 



Private Baths 



Newly Renovated 



156 West 35th Street, off Broadway, New York City 



IRVINGTONHALL 



SES TO 359 WEST S1ST STREET Phone: Columbus 7152 

An elevator, fireproof balldlng of the newest type, having every device and convenient*. 
I Apirtmentt are beautifully amngsd, aitdeonMit of 2, 8 and 4 rooms, with kltohens and 

' Mtohetiettss, tiled bath and 'phone. / 117.00 Up Weekly. 

Address all commnnicatlons to Charles Tenenbanm, Irvlngton nail 

j-. No cennsotlsn with any ether house . .. 

BSaassmasBsai in ———•^—mmmmmiM^mmm4mmM^—~+*^**m*mmmm*tam*Kmr*mmiw*~* 




HOTEL 
CLARENDON 

North Clark sad Ontario Streets 
CHICAGO 

Fire Islnatse from the Loop 
Modern Cooraolsnoee 

Weekly Bate*, St to $10 

Fhous: Baparlor tOft 



George B. Paatogen, wife of the local man- 
ager of the Pantages Theatre, were two of 
the Judges at the Great War Veterans' Asso- 
ciation masquerade which waa recently held 
at the Arena. 



The Vancouver Symphony Society, the or- 
ganization of > which as an Incorporated com- 
pany was recently completed, has engaged the 
Orpheum Theatre for a series of ten concerts 
to be given next season. The first of watch 
will be held on Oct. 5. Admission will be 85 
cents, 55 cents and $1,00. Subscription for a 
neat to each of the ten concerts will entitle 
the subscriber to membership In the society. 
Mr. Henry Green has been retained for next 
season to conduct the orchestra, which gave 
Us first concerts last winter. 



Admission to the evening performances at 
Pantages has been raised from 30 and 40 cents 
to 35 and 46 cents. The prices for the com- 
ing season at the Orpheum will be the 



LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED 
POSING ROOMS IN THE COUNTRY 

(MUNI) IMAiN'oWiUVlSUKL) V OK -ALL MUSICAL ACTS 

BLOOM 

s'r.Y'j K'Y/AKrYJiYnc;';Y(:H[(YAc;6 Y 



Phone Randolph 3393 



.oI^SSbtS PELHAM tiEATH INN 

Pattern Parkway, at Eaatehester Aveaaes and 

BLOSSOM HEATH INN 

. Merrick Bead, Lyabrsek, L. L Uaeanaled la Calslne and Service. 

Open All Year Under direction of H. & J. Susekind 






THE ADELAIDE 

754-756 EIGHTH AVENUE 

Between 44th and 47th Streets One Bleek West of Broadway 

Three, Four and Flve-Boem High-Class Tarnished Apartments— 110 Up 

Strictly Pref eesionat. HB8. GEOHGE HIEGEL, Mgr. Pheaeet Bryant 8»t»-l 



WHEN IN NEW YORK 



Malts airaapiainni fee ear I, 9. tV 4 reaai ceeistete jiseeeXeepI w .ast/taeata. ^wlt h ertvet s hams. aVery 
■Saafellea. Nliht and day ssrvtoo. SetotsJ retas to tte thitfVe l ewfew les. 



SPECIAL SUMMEB BATES 



ARDSLEY 

BROADWAY 

112 WEEKLY AND UP At Mr* Sbaat B«rt Oentrai Uesatlso 

' ALBBBT GUMBTNER, Manager 



ASHFORD 

UN 



Clreta 1114 



with the exception of the gallery and second 
balcony. The evening prices for the gallery 
have been increased from IB to 25 cents, and 
the last nine rows of the balcony will be 40 
cents Instead of 80 cents. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

By HABDIB ME AKIN. 

KEITH'S.— Vaudeville. ... 

NATIONAL.— "Civilian Clothes" opened Mon- 
day night and received the worst "panning",' 
from the local morning press of any produc- 
tion In a long time. . 

3HUBERT-GARRICK.— The Garrtek Players 
In a most pretentions production of "Hvery- 
woman," with Julia Dean brought here for the 
week to appear In the leading role. The piece 
was excellently staged ; Augustine J. Olassmlre, 
the local director, received untold aid from 
William Prlngle, who appeared in his old role, 
"Nobody," and with the addition of a symphony 
orchestra the performance was one that de- 
serves nothing but words of praise. 

BHUBERT-BELASCO.— Continuing the film, 
"The Birth of a Race." Business good. 



POLI'S.— "Mickey." film, held over for this 
week. Excellent business has been the rule. 

COSMOS.— "The Love of Mike"; Downing 
and Bun In ; George Armstrong: the Blroy 
Sisters f Johnston Brothers and Johnson; Bed- 
dlngton and Grant: feature film. 

OATETT.— "Social Maids." 

L YCEU M,— Opening within two weeks. 

LOEWS PALACE.— Elsie Ferguson Jp "A ' 
Society Exile." -fF 

LOEWS COLUMBIA.— "A Little Brother of 
the Rich." 

MOORE'S RTALTO.— Jack Pickford In "Bur- 
glar by Proxy." 

ORANDALL'P METROPOLITAN. — Norma 
Talmadge In "The Way of a Woman." 

George Mnrahsli !« giving no Ws active Inter- 
est In the Oarrlck Pin vers within the next two 
weeks. L. Monta Bell will continue the com- 
pany until Oct. SO, giving the organization 
eight week* additional to what wan originally 
planned. Mr. Marshall states that his with- 
drawal will not Affect his plans for the coming 
Beacon and that contracts have been signed 
with a numhor of this season's favorites for 
their return then. . 




INERS 
AKE-UP 



To date the sctor's strike In New York City 
has not reached this city; rterformances have 
been srtven as scheduled and, with the excen-' 
tlon of the rumored resignation from the Equity 
Ansoclatlon of Olive Tell, appearing In "Civil- 
ian Clothes," everything Is quiet. ' ■" • 



General Peyton O. March, Chief of Staff, and 
his family have been regular Monday night 
patrons of the Oarrlck Stock Company. 



CLIFFORD 



MARGARET 



NELSON and^eVANS 



REFRESHING COMEDY 

WRITER OF MATERIAL FOR 

Babe LaTour, Johnny Singer and Dolls, Malcolm 
and Lamar, Edna and Leo Miller, many others. 



In a Satire on the Movies, entitled "THE VAMP" 

WRITTEN BY CLIFFOBD NELSON ' 



WITTY SONGS 

Playing 
B. F. Keith Circuit 



SPECIAL SCENERY 



Direction, ED. S. KELLER 



asaaaasj 






l 



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: 










i ;■,,•■..■.>_.,■. 
, '3 









ICTURE S 



LONDON FILM NOTES. 



London, Aug. 5. 

within a hundred yards of "Tiger Bay" and 

In lew than a stone's throw ot .the giant 

Cunardera berthed In Surrey Dock la what Is 

probably the most remarkable film In existence, 

- and Its owner's pride Is perhaps the greater 

."... because there Is no duplicate— a film history 

ot the war in 199 scenes and going through 

all the most Important phases ot the world 

conflict from the Hun violation ot Belgian 

territory to the armistice. 

Elsie Ferguson is coming over here shortly 
to play In the Famous Players-Lasky produc- 
tion ot Sir Arthur Wing Plnere's "His House 
in Order," the play made famous by the late 
Sir George Alexander at the fit. James' The- 
atre. Miss Ferguson, by the way, made her 
screen debut in a picture play founded on a 
novel by another British author, to wit: 
motions' "Barbery Sheep." It we can't turn, 
out the ideal pictures Just yet, at any rat* 
the material we provide takes some beating. 

The Victory Procession film is causing a 
good deal of discontent, People grumble that 
they have to wait hours to see it, probably 
pay profiteering prices to stand In the crowd 
when they do get In, and then the "feature" 
is dropped In as a mere "topical," and 
it is shown it is "scrappy" and there is nothing 
to tell the man in the street who Is who or 
what's what 



Albert DeCourvllle's threatened cinema 
newspaper might have been very useful here, 
but we don't hear much about this scheme to 
revolutionize the topical nowadays. It was an 
ambitious scheme in wlilch the events of the 
day were going to be shown upon the screen 
at Terry's Theatre in the Strand, even the 
"late news" was going to be banded over by 
the projector. Edgar Wallace, Journalist, 
novelist, and war correspondent, was and, as 
far as Is known, is editor-in-chief ot the super- 






topical. 






:.■■■ 



:■■■■:■ 



Tears ago at every village fete "grinning 
through the ass's collar" was a popular feature. 
We now have a modern version ot it At many 
cinemas a greatly enjoyed turn la the rehearsal 
of a picture-drama, volunteers from the 
"screen struck" In the audience playing the 
parts, and the following night the "feature" 
is screened. After that the "world-be's" should 
either be put Into a lethal chamber at the 
public's expense, destroyed by their friends, or 
allowed to retire gracefully by means of "hari- 
kari." Doubtless such exhibitions bring grist 
to the managerial mill, but it all goes to swell 
the ranks of the unemployed. • 

Members of the trade are acquiring literary 
education slowly, but surely. Not long ago a 
renting firm advertised " 'Tom Browne's School 
Days,' by Henry Fielding," and now we have 
an exhibitor Joyously announcing " 'A Tale of 
Two Cities,' adapted from Dumas' famous 
novel." Where Ignorance is bliss, 'tie tolly to 
be wise. 

: We are threatened with the first all-British 
serial drama, "The Amazing Adventures ot 
Ernest Bliss," Phillips Oppenhelm as the au- 
thor, and Cecil Hep worth as the producer, are 
the culprits. 

We have some men over here who should 
have been handed over to the other side of 
the Rhine long ago, and there Is at 'least one 
daily newspaper whose night editorial ad- 
dress is Berlin. It also owns a cinema au- 
thoffty, and he has discovered a Sim which 
shows the terrible condition ot things in 
Vienna all through that wicked, blackguardly 
strongle-hold of an Allied blockade. This 
alleged film — no one but the Herald seema to 
know anything about it— is Bald to be doing 
well in Wales, where a lot of the coal and 
trouble comes from. In other words, the 
cinema Is being used to "buck up" the Bolshe- 
vik tencencles ot a principality that loves 
strikes and is the happy hunting ground of 
the agitator while he's living. 

i 

There's to be no more cursing. For screen 
tips to form the sub-title "Damn" is going to 
be a horrible offence. In the future, we shall 
see a commanding officer telling the subaltern 
suspected of espionage that he's a "naughty, 
naughty boy," and the brutal skipper of the 
bark "Nancy Lee" will order the heroine 
disguised as a cabin boy so's to follow her 
true love afloat to come down from the mast- 
head in the following sub-title, "Come down 
from there, you blooming angel. You know 
what I meant" 



NEWS OF THE FILM WORLD. 



J. J. Marks and O. J. Mauer have Joined the 
Select staff as traveling auditors. i 

1 Alan Orosland has Joined the staff of di- 
rectors ot the Selsnlck Pictures Corp. 

R. Cecil Smith haijolned the Seinuck scena- 
rio staff. He Is now at work in the local 
studio.. ' 

David G. Fischer will direct World's forth- 
coming screen production ot the play, "Dad's 
GlrL" • ■.■■■■ ■ , ..■• ;;. ; • • \ . 

WUllaim Farnuxn has suited work on J. 
Huntley McCarthy's work, "If I Were King," 
which will be the stare next Vox feature. 

World Films has engaged Raymond MoKee 
to play opposite Bvelyn Greeley in an Oscar 
Apfel production- 
Ralph Qulve has been ' appointed manager 
ot the San Francisco offices of the Realart 
Corp. >. ' •■ ■:'. •••; /.-;.■•'- •',• '■•'..'.•• ' ■.'., /•.'; ■: \] 

Charles Spers has been engaged by Vita, 
to playing the leading role opposite Bessie 
Love in her next feature. 

World Films has purchased from John 
Franklin Poland, "Possession," which will be 
made into a five-reel picture. 

"Miss Crusoe of the Chesapeake," In which 
Virginia Hammond will be starred, will be re- 
leased by World Films, Sept 29. , 

"Miss Captain Kidd," by Hamilton Thomp- 
son, will be a World September release, with 
Evelyn Greeley starred. 

W. R. Wllkerson, of the New York office of 
Universal, has been appointed manager of the 
Kansas City u Exchange. 

Picture operators in San Francisco houses 
were last . week accorded an Increased salary 
by the various theatre managers. \ ,' 

Howard Dietz has been made manager ot 
Goldwyn's exploitation and service depart- 
ment . ■ - . : * '■ 

Eugene 1. Roth, managing director ot the 
California and Portola theatres, has signed 
the first contracts in the West for the stars 
of the new Select Pictures. 






:•••: 

fc 






The London Film Company are going to 
screen Florence Marden's novel, "The House 
on the Marsh." This book, first published in. 
the lighties, is still a big seller. 

' It is rumored that Martin Johnson, of "Ad- 
ventures Among the Cannibals" fame, has 
been killed by South Sea Islanders after a stiff 
fight. No confirmation either way Is obtain- 
able, although it is pointed out that the Gov- 
ernment would hardly have let them go far 
Into the interior without adequate guards, 

: Perhaps this is a bit of American press work. 

The Wilde-Moore fight is the "goods" In 
every way and the Walturdaw Company de- 
servo some luek after the awful fiasco of the 
last big fight before the Flyweight Champion- 
ship event 

One of the stunts at the Cinema Gympbana 
will be a 10O-yd. flat race between Stewart 
Rome and Eddie* Polo. Rome is now with 
"Broadhurst," and the herculean Eddie Is 
busily engaged taking scenes for the "Broken 
' Idol." '.. 



H. E. Lots has been appointed manager ot 
Select's Los Angeles exchange. He was for- 
merly Pacific Coast manager for the same con- 
cern. The change was made at his request 

Jackie Saunders has been engaged by World 
Films for the star role in "Dad's Girl," a 
forthcoming production. David o. ^Fischer 
will be, the director. • , 

' "Perils of Thunder Mountain" is the title 

of the new serial in which Antonio Moreno 

is starred. Pauline Curley will play op- 
posite Mr. Moreao. 

"The i Day Resurgent" by 0. Henry is the 
title of Vita, feature in which Gypsy O'Brien 
will be starred. It will be Miss O'Brien's 
first appearance on the screen. 



Louise Lester has been engaged by Allan 
Dwan to take a leading role In "The Luck ot 
the Irish," which will be released by the Dwan 
Films late In September. ■ • ;'. . 

E. 0. Chllda, branch manager of the Paths 
at San Francisco, has been promoted to studio 
manager of the Pathe plant at Hollywood, 
Cal. J. Henrloulle succeeds Chllds here. 

The name ot the studio and plant built and 
formerly occupied by the Thanhbuser Films, 
at New Rochelle, has been renamed the 
Fischer studios, after A. H. Fischer, who re- 
cently acquired the property. ■• 

The title of the first production of the Rob- 
ert W. Chambers series of stories which . B. 
A. Rolfe is plcturislhg for the new firm of 
A. H. Fischer Features, Inc., is "The Amaz- 
ing Lovers." 

Crane Wilbur has 'received ah offer from a 
prominent picture producer to star in a pic- 
ture written by himself. If he accepts he will 
co-star with his sister-in-law, known as Maryon 
Vadl* 



World's program for September includes 
five releases In which June Elvldge, Bvelyn 
Greeley, Earl Metoalfe, Virginia Hammond, 
Arthur Ashley and Dorothy Green are cast' for 
the stellar, roles. 

Crelgbton Hale will be featured by World 
Films In "The Black Circle," work on which 
will start next week at the Fort' Lee studio. 
The.Btory is by -"Raymond C. Hill. The film 
will be released early in October. 

Elsie JanlB' initial Selsnlck release, "Every- 
body's Sweetheart," has been retltled "A Reg- 
gular Girl." This will mean a great deal of 
wasted expense in useless publicity under the 
former title and the large electric signs along 
Broadway. 

*.> %. . ,— 

Marshall Neilan, speaking to newspaper re- 
porters, declared his Intention to desert Los 
Angeles and settle in San Francisco provid- 
ing the city erected a Municipal Studio as In- 



CRITICISM OF THE FILMS. 

New York, Aug. IS. 
Editor Vaiubtt: 

.1 heartily agree, as a director of mo- 
tion pictures, with the masterly way 
Ralph Ince has answered the criticism 
of directors and their methods in hand* 

ling screen stories. . 

To Yasibtt the business will have a 
great debt to pay if it succeeds in 
obliterating the obnoxious "fly-by- 
night" stock selling, swindle, bunco 
game that is being practiced in many 
towns and cities and here in our own 
burgh by people that no not know neg- 
ative from positive film. These fakirs 
open an office and start peddling stock 
with various methods and inducements 
to the unwary one with the elusive 
dollar. They generally have the act 
well rehearsed land staged so that 
when the angel accidentally on pur- 
pose falls into the lair of the film 
wolves" he or she fs immediately 
pounced upon by a silver tongued ora- 
tor and gently relieved of all the filthy 
lucre available and the mortgage on 
the farm if there is one. 

Now in ridding the industry of these 
skunks that take a poor man or wom- 
an's life's savings like they would take 
candy from a child, and are giving the 
picture industry a bad name that seri- 
ously hampers a legitimate man and 
his proposition, that might, make real 
money once started, VARiBTr would be 
doing a universal service that no other 
paper has ever gotten up sufficient 
"nerye to do. • -: \. 

'.' These fakir's promise big returns and 
engage medicore unknown players and 
alleged directors. They peddle their 
junk productions and are even en- 
couraged by some of the cheaper' dis- 
tributing organizations who offer the-; 
popular "6040" proposition. They 
have nothing to "Sose no matter how 
rotten the picture. This is an added 
incentive for the promoters to raise 
more money and wonderful bait for 
suckers for they have a "market." 
There are some of these fakirs operat- 
ing now in Philadelphia and in New 
York C>ty and the best place for them 
is some jail. They mislead the public, 
misrepresent, are bunco men and- 
should not be allowed to run like wa- 
ter without being checked. . 

I have before me a case that might 
prove interesting reading especially 
to those who reside in Philadelphia 
where this journal is widely read. The 
case is one where the promoters never 
worked in the film game outside of 
a mob scene over in Fort Lee, N. J., 
for orit of the /ompanies and the "di- 
rector" never even as much as worked 
for a mediocre film company as an ac- 
tor. These self same people expect 
to teach other people and make the 
investors' money when they themselves 
know nothing and are getting money 
under false pretenses and should be 
arrested. 

This company has a new. method, for 
the method is a very important thing 
in floating one of these "hoakums," for. 
it's the method used that gets or don't 
get the coin.. These birds teach act- 
ing and to learn the silent art from 
these instructors that don't know any- 
thing about it themselves cos ts money, 

tended. Among others enthusiastic about the 
Pacific Cosst Metropolis as a movie center 
ars Clara Kimball Young and Frank Keenan. 

Tbe first Paramount Screen Magazine sub- 
ject Is scheduled for release Sept 7, with 
one to follow every week thereafter. The 
Paramount people are trying a new Innovation 
In the way of weekly magazines. They have 
contracted with the Popular Mechanics Maga- 
zine to present the moat Important technical 
and scientific topics in screen form. Bach 
release also will contain an animated cartoon, 
not of the usual topical form treating with 
an issue ot tbe hour, but purely tor the enter- 
tainment value tbe drawings entail. Under a 
caption of "Three Minutes of Wit," all the 
epigrams canned from the "Smart Set" maga- 
zine will be shown. Similarly, Helen Row- 
land's "Reflections of a Bachelor Girl," as run 
in the local "Evening World" and syndicated 
throughout the Pulitzer newspapers, will also 
form an Important weekly feature of the maga- 
zine. * 



but when you purchase a certain 
amount of shares you are made a mem- 
ber of the stock company and with 
your own money you get a chance to 
picture act. A few would-be-films 
are prodtrced to be within the law 
by the would-be director who is per- 
haps getting thirty or forty dollars 
a week more than he could get on a 
Broadway corner holding: down the 
side walk for the city. 

There never was a stock scheme 
that ever made an investor a dollar in 
the motion picture business, and we 
have had all sort 9 of schemes and 
stunts that looked good when they 
were far away. Good propositions 
never go a-begging for financial as- 
sistance, so don't ever fear a local 
fly-by-night outfit will ever make a 
dime from its venture, for they never 
have and are a detriment to the mo- 
tion picture industry and should be 
driven put for good and all time. They 
have given the picture business a bad 
name and the sooner -the people are 
educated to steer clear of the small 
town "million dollar profits" proposi- 
ti "? . of the movies the sooner we 
shall be able to rid ourselves of these 
pe** 3 and confidence men who belong 
behind bars for they are no good and 
dishonest. No recognized producer of 
the m P. D. A. Motion Picture Di- 
rectors Association is ever found 
amongst them. It's generally someone 
tfiatneve^ saw a studio or a punk 

ham' ready and willing to defame 
chance to shine where the girls are. 
' >»* « C . -:£3W* F- Donovan. 
:r (M. P. X).. A„ Green Room Glub.)- 



•/< 

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7- 

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. v ..... . ,'. . . . Gladys Brockwell 

>>•..• ••••<•.. •'. .William Scott 

...... . ....... , . . , . , .Richard RosBon 

• •••'■• .Harry Dunklnson 

....... 



CHASING RAINBOWS. 

Sadie. . , 
Billy:,. 
Skinny. . 
Jerry..., 

rHllt" "••••• Irene" Aldwyn 

tr~ to«'i;«: ■ s • • it • Wa, t or Long 

Mp »- waiters .i... ..Claire McDowell 

m £ rod .. u i er ' J" Film Corp. ; story, Karl Harri- 
man ; scenario, R. A Galdwln ; direction, Frank 
Beal ; photographer. Friend H. Baker. Miss 
Brockwell Is starred in this flve-reeler sched- 
uled, for release on Nov. 2. The production 
is on the same par as all Fox-Brockwell yarns 
are, and will hold up Its end no a program 
feature passably well. There is nothing start- 
llngly new In either story, its treatment, locale, 
photography and enactment to place It above 
the usual standard. 

Miss Brockwell as Sadie, a ple-sllnger, Is 
crossed in love, Is transplanted to a new terri- 
tory In a similar capacity, finds a husband 
and fade-outs at the end In the conventional 
"clinch." The support Is worthy. Abel,:. 

HER FIRST KISS. 

This Fox-Sunshine comedy, like all slap- 
stick effusions from the Fox fun factory, Is 
certain to please anywhere, It's ot the old 
slap-Btlck genera, but, nevertheless, Is enter- 
taining. No fearing' of T. B. M.'s tiring their 
cranial organs In following the plot. Certoln.x 
however, to tire the humorous veins of the 
ditto. There's a laugh packed In every ten 
feet of the twin reel. Abel. 



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If 

V. -V 



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EXTRA PEOPLE MEETING 

An important meeting interesting 
extra people will be held at Grenable; 
Hall, 44th street between Sixth and 
Seventh avenues tonight (Friday), Thera 
meeting will be called to order at 8.30.-- l - 



.,: 



Miles Playing Majestic, Detroit. 
Detroit, Aug. 20. 
The Majestic will open Labor Day 
with vaudeville, operated by Charles' 

H. Miles.: ' 



Jack 
Cunningham 

Associated with 

George Loane Tucker 
Productions 

HOLLYWOOD, CAL. 



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MS?- -■ 



MOVING PICTU 






KATHLEEN MAVOURNEEN. 

Kathleen Ma vou rneen T heda Bara 

Kathleen's Father Edward O'Connor 

Kathleen's Mother Jennie Dlokerson 

Terence O'Moore Raymond McKee 

The Squire of Tralae Marc McDermott 

Lady Clancarthy Marlca Harris 

Sir John Clancarthy Henry Hal lam 

Donis O'Rourke Harry Gripp 

Father O'Flynn Morgan Thorpe 

Directed by Charles J. Brabln In- this 
dramatization of the old Irish song, Theda 
Bara In " Kathleen Mavourneen" does her best 
to dissociate herself from "vampire" parts. 
Her trouble, however, Is that she has to mak« 
the effort. She Is forever acting, posing with 
an exaggerated air oi sweetness, shedding in 
every direction the light of her smiles. Her 
director, nevertheless, has gotten some good 
local color Into his arrangements. The light- 
ing effects, too, are excellent and the photog- 
raphy almost as good as In "Evangeline," and 
when you have said that you've said some- 
thing. 

Kathleen its an Irish coleen. Seeing her at 
Denny brooK. Fair, the Squire falls In love with 
her and sends his agent to her father and 
mother to tell them they must pay or be 
evicted. To pay Is beyond' them. As the 
price of letting them alone he tells Kathleen 
he wilt accept her in marriage. Desperate, 
she takes him, but her own true lover, mean- 
while, has been busy In the effort to save her. 
So, by the usual route, the story works through 
to the accepted dramatic conclusion. Leed. 

THE BRAMBLE BUSH. 

Kaly Dial..... Corinne Griffith 

John Crlspen i Frank Hills 

This is a Vltagraph production, directed by 
Tom Terr la from Kathleen S. Reed's adapta- 
tion of Nalbro Bartley's yarn of the same 
name, which ran In a popular periodical re- 
cently. The theme Itself could lend Itself 
readily to a mora vicious method of treatment, 
but the Vita, finesse take away a lot of the 
sting from the subject Whether that deserves 
praise or not Is difficult to Bay, since the very 
delicacy ot some of the situation prevents such 
silk glove handling and makes It a tame affair 
when there Is really a good cause for being 
"naughty." Of course, such Btuff always has 
a box office appeal, but the story in the main 
is trite both in situation and treatment 

Miss Griffith's near-bucollc characterisation 
and unsophlstlcatlon of deportment keeps the 
Interest going. The story itself brings to light 
the old story ot an orphan coming to this city 
to secure employment at the home ot her 
deceased mother's friend ; she is given a posi- 
tion at her fashionable modiste shop, where 
she meets several people who affect her for 



the rest of the running time of the feature. 
Charmed by the suavity of John Crlspen, she 
is almost willing to become his, body and soul, 
without the conventional marital ties, and Is 
saved In the nick of time. The villain is 
shown up, and the modest, but deserving, hero 
comes into his own In the form of a fade-out 
olinch at the end. It's a very light concoction, 
but will please on any program. Attl. 

DELIVERANCE. 

ACT I.— (Childhood). 
Little Etna Ross, (aged 7), 

Little Blind Helen Keller 
Edythe Lyle as Helen Keller's famous 

teacher, Anne Sullivan 
Roy Stewart as -Helen's father, 

Captain Keller 
Betty Schade as Helen's mother, 

Mrs. Kate Keller 
Little Tula Belle (age 8) as 

„ - Foreign born Nadja 

John Cosgrove as.,.NadJa's immigrant father 
Mary Tolenski as Nadja's Immigrant mother 

Joy Montana (age 4) as ......Joy 

Edythe Chapman as Helen's instructor 

at Horace Mann School, Sarah Fuller 
Jenny Lind (age 7) as 

, Pickaninny Martha Washington 

Sarah Lind' as Old Black Mammy 

James Dunn as Lite Saver at Plymouth Rock 
James Warfleldas Dr. Alexander Graham 
Bell, Inventor of telephone and 

' Helen's life long friend 

Davlea Thompson as Rev. Phillips Brooks, 
Helen's spiritual advisor 

Elmo Lincoln as ....Ignorance 

Charlotte) Mesfeau as..... Knowledge 

Harold Judson as ..George Washington 

ACT n.— (Maidenhood). 

Ann Mason as ...Helen Keller 

Edythe Lyle as her girl companion, 

Anne Sullivan 

Tula Bell as , Nadja 

Josef de Serlno as Josef, sweetheart of Nadja 
Ivan Tchkowskl as the "Old Music Master" 
Herbert Hayes as Ulysses, Helen's sweetheart 
Thomas Jefferson as Joseph Jefferson in 

"Rip Van Winkle" 

James Howarth as Mark Twain 

Henry Russell as A Radcliffe Professor 

ACT III.— (Womanhood). 

Helen Keller ; Herself 

(Mrs.) Anne Sullivan (Macy) Herself 

Mrs. Kate Adams Keller, Helen's mother, 

Herself 
Phillips . Brooks Keller, Helen's brother, 

Himself 
Polly Thomson, Helen's secretary.. .Herself 
Ardlta Melllnlno as the regenerated Nadja 
Parke Jones as an A, B. F. soldier, > 

Nadja's son 
This Is a fascinating picture. Going there 



expecting a rather tiresome piece of "uplift" 
propaganda, the reviewer came away In- 
spired, and the audience was with him In 
that mood. All through the showing spon- 
taneous applause marked the high moments. 
There is something of pathos, something ot 
wonder and a great dignity In this girl's 
fight against adversity, against blindness, 
and the fact that she was deaf and dumb. 

But the entire credit for the success of 
this production cannot Justly be given to 
Helen Keller, great as her achievements are 
In life, for in the making of the film many 
had a hand. Of these George Foster Piatt, 
the director, contributed most, after the 
heroine, to this nine reel feature's value. 
His directorial skill was amazingly seconded 
by such photography as has never been shown 
outside a Griffith picture. It was the work of 
Arthur Todd and Lawrence Fowler. - 

The story was written by Dr. Francis Trev- 
elyan Miller, editor emeritus of "The Jour? 
nal of American History" and a friend of 
Miss Keller's. It is somewhat Jumpy, but 
seeks to illustrate MIbb Keller's attitude to- 
ward social conditions as they exist today. 
Edwin Liebf reed contributed some Inserts In 
verse and Joseph White Farnham edited the 
film. A musical score was written by Dr. 
Anselm Costal, of the Metropolitan orchestra, 
to accompany the picture and he conducted 
the augmented orchestra In person at the 
Lyrlo Theatre opening Monday evening last 
During the showing Miss Keller sat In a box. 

There remains to be said something about 
the acting. Those who see the picture will 
not soon forget the work ot Etna Roes, Edythe 
Lyle and Ann Mason. The first and last kept 
in character so well that the effect touched 
one's heart, and to Edythe Lyle's screen per- 
sonality there is a sympathy, a charm that is 
far above the general. 

The story Itself has been Indicated above. 
It Is relatively unimportant for the drama be- 
gins when Miss Lyle's speaking fingers first 
touch the little child's hand, when the child 
begins to understand,, and it ends when, after 
the 'rarely effective acting of the two imper- 
sonators, there appears on the screen Miss 
Keller herself. Her quiet, peaceful face looks 
out on you like a benediction and from then 
on we are shown how she lives her life despite 
Its handicaps. 

THE GREY HORIZON. ; 

Tono Masato Sessuel Hayakawa 

Doris Furthman Eileen Percy 

John Furthman Bertram Orassby 

O Maru San Tsurl Aokt 

Robert Marsh ••!•>•• Andrew Robson 

Like most Haworth productions, featuring 
the versatile , Seaeue Hayakawa, this is a so- 
ciety drama. Like aU of them, it is a worthy 
production and deserves extensive bookings. 



Like all ot them, the photography is excellent, 
the direction meritorious and the story inter- 
esting. But unlike the usual run of films, the 
ending is what is commonly termed "sad." So 
educated have picture tans become into expeot- . 
ing a circle vignette "clinch" ending that the 
conclusion to this film was almost a shook to . 
the reviewer's neighbors, many of them even 
doubting the "The End' 1 final caption ot the 
feature. 

The story concerns Yono (Mr. Hayakawa). 
who Is a struggling artist hiding away in the 
hills. Some ot his work comes to the atten- 
tion of John Furthman, excellently portrayed 
by that sturdy "villain" type, Bertram Grassby, 
who seeks out this obscure Jap for no good 
moral reason. 

After befriending him for a little while, he 
endeavors to secure Yono's alliance to a bond 
counterfeiting scheme, wherein the artist 
plays the part of coloring the valuable bond 
paper to. pass for the genuine. Contrary to 
Furthman's premiss that the Jap "would not 
know the bond from a valentine," Yolo dis- 
covers the duplicity and flatly refuses. 

A few days preceding this episode, Maru 
San, played by Tsuru Aokl (Mrs. Hayakawa) 
had arrived from Japan to visit her brother, 
Yono. This was a shock to Yono, who had 
promised to bring her over In due time, that 
time depending on when he secured the where- 
withal. Maru Bah had been prompted to 
scrape together enough money to come to 
America in an effort to find her husband, an 
Englishman, who had deserted her after mar- 
riage. John Furthman Is the man, 

As a result of Yono's discovery of Furth- 
man's treachery, Mara San Is accidentally ' 
shot in the fight that ensues. Furthman es- 
capes, but is run down by the Incensed Yono, 
who, after accusing him as a bigamist, a 
counterfeiter and a murderer, kills him. , 
Yono is befriended by the now defunct Furth- 
man's wife — she being unaware of the marital 
relationship— -and becomes enamored with her. 
Through a series of episodes, Yono confesses 
his guilt in killing Furthman, albeit justified 
in the action, but rather than wreck Mrs. 
Furthman'B life he destroys the evidence ot 
her husband's guilt, which Includes the counter- 
felt bonds and the marriage license of his 
tie to O Maru San. - 

The film concludes with Robert Marsh, Mrs. 
Furthman's financial adviser, telephoning for 
the police, the widow of the counterfeiter 
being unaware of any connection between her 
husband and the artist 

Clifford Howard Is responsible for both 
story and continuity, William Worthihgton 
directed, with Frshk D. Williams turning the 
camera crank. Before concluding, Mary Jane 
Irving's personation of a four-year-old lad, 
Kenneth, deserves special praise. And she 
makes a right handsome boy! AM. 






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:• - -/' 



"A REGULAR GIRL 



91 



has been adopted as the title of the big Selznick production 

• ■ ■ ■' -i 

previously advertised as "Everybody's Sweetheart," starring 

ELSIE JAMS 



•;\ : 



Story by Frances Marion and Edmund Goulding 
Direction, James Young 



Made by Selznick 



Distributed by Select 



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*. v ."■' 



JK 







m 



VING PICTURES 



,:.■•'■;/ 77 ■■'■ 



■'-^•••■•*-ir- 



THE RIALTO. 

. The Rialto this week la carried over the top 

.'by Cbarles Bay in the Paramount picture, 

"Bill Henry," which la more fully noticed 

elsewhere in this department But Ray la 

":■■■ not the. only good number -on thla waU se- 

locted program. While he baa plenty of 

comedy himself, the Bennett offering, "The 

Dentist," is a scream from foot to foot. 

,. The Rialto Magazine, specially chosen for 

this playhouse, contained some excellent news 

selections, "Relaxation" and the "Happy 

Hooligan" cartoon. Unlike moat of Dr. Relsen- 

feld's offerings in the musical line, thla week's 

does not seem quit© up to the standard. 

Perhaps |lt is too melodic with too pro- 
nounced emphasis falling on the "Madame 
Sherry" part, the principal rendering of the 
orchestra. 
The show ended with Handel's Largo. 

fee* 

BILL HENRY. 

Bill Henry Jenkins. Charles Bay 

Lola Mason Edith Roberta' 

Burton Rogers Win. Carroll 

. Uncle Chet Jenkins Bert Woodruff 

Aunt Martha Jenkins, 

Mrs. Jennie Lee Courtright 

E. J. Burroughs .....Walter Perkins 

Salesman Walter HIera 

This Paramount offering with Charles Ray , 
In a new version of himself Oils all the re- 
quirements of a good feature. It is well de- 
vised, written, directed, and the star himself, 

■ ; with his simple, natural manner, la a show 
without assistance. All he needs to win out 
Is a reasonable story and plenty of rope, and 
the first Lola Zellner and Jullen Josepbaon, 
Who are respectively responsible for the tale. 
and Its rendering In screen form, have given 
him. The director, Jerome Storm, apparently 
helped the star to all the room possible In 
which to perform and kept the rest of the 
cast up to the mark. 

As Uncle Chet Jenkins, Bert Woodruff gave 
an exceptionally amusing and "live" imper- 
sonation. He appeared to like his Job and ■ 
certainly threw Into It enough seat to keep 
those looking on entirely happy while he was 
In the picture. 

The story Is that of a young country boy 
who is determined to get on In life. He takes 
on a contract to sell electric vibrators, but the 
treatment be tries on his "prospects" Is so 
heroic that he bas to give up selling. One of 

.the vibrators he keeps In the sample room of 

. the hotel where his uncle takes hint on as a 
clerk. Unole hires him on the understanding 
that he will not play poker with the guests. 

. To help out a young girl, though, he takes on 



the crowd, trims them, and with his winnings 
buys the farm his sweetheart thought Worth- 
less. Shortly after he finds he can sell It for 
a big sum because there's oil on the place. 
The real estate operator, however, gets him in 
bad by lying, but Ray goes after him and In 
a likely scrap ties him up with a rope, puts 
the vibrator on him and makes' him tell the 
truth. L9tA. 

THE STRAND. 

There la something fascinating to anyone 
who has followed the choices of Dr. Riesenteld 
for the Rlvoll and Rialto about the musical 
selections made by Jack Eaton for the Strand 
program. This week he has his orchestra 
playing parte of Maacagnl'a "Cavallerla Rus- 
tlcana" and "Annie Laurie" among other 
things. Taking no chances with the high brow 
stuff, Mr. Baton baa set up the standard of 
old favorites to go by, and bis patrons can ba 
properly grateful. The two soloists were Carta 
Ferrettl and Eldora Stanford. "The Jewels 
of the Madonna" was played by the orchestra, 
with Carl Edouarde conducting, and the organ 
solo was made up of selections foam "The 
Royal Vagabond." 

The feature, given a more extended notice 
elsewhere, was Mabel Normand In "Upstairs," 
a Goldwyn picture. The Strand Topical Re- 
view, with some excellent views of that very 
agreeable young man, the Prince of Wales, 
was Interesting as was the scenic, an Outing- 
Chester production. The 'comedy waa Harold 
Lloyd In "Be My Wife." Personally, we pre- 
fer him. He'a always an artist and always 
funny. LesoT. 

UPSTAIRS. 

Elsie MacFarland Mabel Normand 

Lemuel Stalllngs... .... Cttllen Landls 

Harrison Perry .....Hallam Cooley 

Detective Murphy .Edwin Stevens 

Chef Henri Robert Bolder . 

Assistant Chef Buddy Post' 

George .......Colin Kenny 

Blolse Barrleon Beatrice Burnham 

James BSrrlson Frederlo Vroora 

Mrs. Barrlson.... .....Kate Lester 

. Mabel Normand got away with it— "It" be- 
ing the bacon— at the Strand again thla week 
when ehe appeared there In the five part 
Goldwyn feature, "Upstairs." Victor L. 
8cbertslnger directed this story, the original 
of which was a magazine yarn by Parley 
Poore Sheehan, and did better work In putting 
It on the screen than anything that bas come 
from bis hand recently. Or Is Miss Nor- 
mand herself more responsible than her di- 
rector for the pleasing qualities of thla offer- 
ing? 
Certainly, she is an attractive young woman. 



There is far more to her than the slap-stick 
comedienne developed — how many years ago 
was it, Mabel?— by Mack Sennett. She has a 
charm that goes deeper than obvious comedy. 
It Is native to .true comedy and alien to the 
roughneck stuff Mack slapped around her in 
the 'days ot Keystone, now no more than a 
half forgotten, name. Ably supported, Miss 
Normand demonstrates this much conclusively 
In the feature under consideration. 

Once more here, she la the slavey who Is. 
always late to work. The chet threatens to 
Gre her If It happens again, but back she goes 
to her old ways, sneaking out to watch people 
dancing upstairs. Caught in the act by one 
of the house guests, she retreats and hides 
herself in a storage room where ahe gets a 
peep at the upper regions through an air pipe. 
But the house guest was rather pleased with 
her. With a *50 bill he bribes a bell hop to 
make a date with the girl for him, but the 
bell hop falls for her, swipes a gray chiffon 
drees, the property ot an eloping heiress, and 
gets Mabel into all sorts of trouble with the 
detective who Is trailing the elopers. 

- : -. m ■ . Lee$. 

THE GIRL ALASKA. 

MoUle McRea. Lottie Kruno 

Phil Hadley Henry Bolton 

Sandy Allen. .... .C. Edwin Cone (of Alaska) 

That's the line-up of this World Film effu- 
sion, captioned to have been made entirely on 
Alaskan location, with the cast comprising 
nativea with the exception of the first two 
principals. All that can be said Is that any 
exhibitor would be Imposing unpardonably on 
his patronage by booking the film as It stands 
Just now. When caught at the N. T. Theatre 
aa the other half of a double-feature bill It 
was the severest bore ever perpetrated within 
the precincts of that bouse. It may be novel, 
and also it Is no doubt true that this 1b the 
first and only picture to be "shot" on Alaskan 
soil, but, as was proven time and time before, 
it takes an American-made product to satisfy 
the film-epicurean tastes of Americana— not 
forgetting that Alaska is a possession of the 
United States. The film, on the other hand, 
can very readily, and no doubt will, be cut 
down to an interesting twln-reeler. 

The fault of the production la its length — 
It Is too long, albeit of the conventional five 
thousand feet. But there's not enough story 
there — and what there is, is oh ! so trite — to 
fill out five rocla. Then, too, whoever is re- 
sponsible for the . direction, did not know 
whether the production was to be an educa- 
tional scenic or a 'story. As a result, It's a 
cross between the two, and the hybrid Is 
nothing to brag about. About the only redeem- 
ing feature of the whole shooting match la 



the excellent photography, even the scenery 
being the cause of that end of It 

Imagine a full-fledged, full-formed and full- 
faced girl passing through four and a half 
reels without divulging her Identity, despite 
the fact that she bunkod with men and was 
subjected to men's hardships) Discounting her 
feminine voice, which to the screen Is hidden, 
her actions and her full form through her 
boy's overalls should' have given her away. 
Yet she tools all the sturdy men about her 
as to her sex I Simitar directorial errors 
throughout the production stamp It for the 
amateur Job It is. 

But where bas Miss Lottie Kruse been hiding 
all these years? Such pretty soreenable face 
and figure deserve some attention with the 
"big tlmo" film producers, 

EVANGiUNE. 

Evangeline ...................Miriam Cooper 

Gabriel ........ *r. Albert Rosooe 

Basil the Blacksmith. ...... .James A. Marcus 

Benedict, father ot Evangeline, 

„, „, Bpottawoode Altken. 

The Notary... ,, William RySS 

By arrangement with the Shuberts William 
Fox took possession last Tuesday of tbe 44th 
Street Theatre and presented at 12.00 top 
scale his two motion picture productions, 
"Evangeline" and "Kathleen Mavourneen." 
Of the two "Evangeline" came first and is the 
more Important ♦ 

But of more Importance still Is the fact that 
the attraction packed them In. The house, 
despite the heat, was crowded to the doors. 
Price didn't seem to matter to the amusement- 
hungry Broadway, and it was noticeable that 
while a few drifted away after the showing 
of the first picture, these drifters were very 
few. Most of the house stayed for the Theda 
Bara showing. » . 

"Evangeline" has been somewhat exten- 
sively reviewed in these columns very re- 
cently, and there 1b, little to add to the pre- 
vious, statements regarding it. Seen formerly 
In the Fox projection room It had the added 
advantage Tuesday night *>t a well chosen 
orchestral accompaniment and decidedly su- . 

Serlor projection. There was not a flicker, 
nly once did the picture get out of Its tram/, 
and that running away was Immediately 
caught find corrected. In brief, this "beauty ' 
picture, with Its wonderfully tinted scenes, its 
classic, pathetic story, Its admirable actio?, 
got away to a good start and won from the 
audience the applause It deserved. 

One or two grouches who insist on "dram- 
mer" were there, but probably came as the 
guest of some critic Generally speaking, 
however, the effect of this Blmple narrative on 
the onlookers was pleasing. • Leed. 



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What Makes An Actress Great? 

YOUTH, Beauty, Talent. Yes, and a Genius for hard work. She 
must give of her best. Absolute Sincerity marks the relation 
of the great artist to her public. 





• :'■ ■ 



has singularly demonstrated these qualities through triumph after 
triumph— an unbroket? record of stage and motion picture successes, in 
which she has endeared herself to the whole amusement loving world. 

Charming, captivating innocence amid morally sordid environment- 
innocence that is protected 'because of its truth— such is the role 
in which Miss Brady achieved one of her biggest stage successes— 
a role in which she is to be seen throughout the world through 
the medium of Realart Pictures — little "Mary Horton" in 



- '" .• 



SINNERS 



I 



New York and the country have paid exceptional tribute to Miss 
Brady as the stage star of this great Owen Davis drama. Now 
exhibitors everywhere are to have the opportunity shortly of 
profiting from the great screen production being made under 
direction of Kenneth Webb. . 



REALART PICTURES CORPORATION 

ARTHUR S. KANE, President 
112 West 42nd Street, New York City 



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COAST PICTURE NEWS. 

By ft A BOHLAGBR 

bos Angeles. Am . 17. 
Ralph Lewis has returned from the North. 

'^?i Gerald Duffy is now with Qoldwyn scenario 

department . 

"Hank Mann Is rushing his new comedies at 
":■£' the Horsley studios. 

%>/' Betty Blytbe has been signed by Qoldwyn. 
80 has Herbert Standing. . 

Henry w. Longfellow has been added to 
Fox'b staff of scenarists. , . _<. • 

.Lester Levy hag been added to Ham Beall's 
presa staff at the Universal. 

W&'~ 

■''>. 5'! Samuel Qoldwyn has returned from the Bast 
He will remain during the summer. , 

' "Buck" Masale, film promoter, la leaving 
neit week for Texas to load up on oil. • , • 

if: '?' Bddle Sutherland won the cup in the Brent- 
wood golf tournament for picture players. 

R'- • Joseph Bngel, of Metro, has gone East on 
one of his periodical cross-country jaunts. 

1 Harry North nip has been selected by Allan 
v-'j-Dwan to play In "The Luck of the Irish." 

'■''-7 " ■■ ~~~ ™ 

V Mabel Condon, the film agent, is entertaining 
I! : her brother, Charlie, Just out of the navy. 

S' l Percy Heath is now scenario chief for Uni- 
m yersal, Eugene Mullin having stepped out 

:';•:, Robert McKlm has left for Seattle with the 
'.> Bex Beach Co. to film "The Sliver Horde." 

K>* Truman Van Dyke, the screen's sole ^red- 
haired lead, Is with Ora Carewe at the U. 

A dance was given at the Brunton studio 
,■;-'•'': by the assistant directors. AU the gang was 
present, 

, Lila Lee is preparing to go Bast for a visit 
V\ ' prior to resuming work in a new Cecil DeMllle 

production. ■, 

.-;•■ Jack Mulball will support Marguerite Clark 
la her next picture under the direction of Wal- 
&■ . ter Edwards. • • 

}•', Qeorge Bellman, editor of the Seattle Times' 
B ;' picture department, was in town for a few 
ix 'days last week. 

m v ' "■ — -r V 

.-;;. I The Lew Cody Co. Is shooting scenes at the 
; Brunton studio. 

R. Cecil Smith has Joined the scenario staff 
of the Seiznick company. 

Wallace Reld's next feature will be "Speed 
i'v -Carr" by J. Stewart Woodhouso.' ' 

'?' r .? : ' ' William Duncan was down from Huntington 
Lako for a few days. His company is there 

making a serial. 



JH'-fc. Mrs. Tod Browning, wife of the Universal 
director, went to Bakersfleld to inspect her 
husband's ranch. 

P'i/tKv 

V -Douglas Fairbanks donated his wild horses 
:f iffor the rodeo at Bxposltlon Park in honor of 

;';! .'■"••the visiting gobs. _ • 

I'' V ' Monroe Lathrop, stage and screen orltto of 
i v -i >:the lAxpress, has quit to loin the publicity 
firm of Willis * milts. 

sgsW B. K, Lincoln baa signed a contract with) 
vKAtne American Cinema Co., whereby he Is to 
V make four productions a year. 
$;■:';'■:• v; ■ 

m ",i'Ivan Abramson's "Someone Must Fay" has 
been completed with Jackie Saunders and Ed- 



I. 



inund Breese featured. 



•."!(:•• 



Kathleen O'Connor has started "The Strange 
■y I Case of Cavendish," provided by Universal as 
i;v. her first starring vehicle. 

JsaijfcW. R, Hearst witnessed the Western pre- 
f ^miere at the Kinema of "The Dark Star." with 
Marlon Davies as the star. 



;:.'■, Mrs. Stella M. DePauw, a wealthy widow 
? of the West has entered pictures "to overcome 
| \ a feeling of loneliness." Sho will. < ' 

!: Ken McOaffey, title writer for Lasky, but 

formerly p. a. for the same, has received bis 

. pilot? license In the air service. ' 

p!' " 

i-, ). Tom Qeraghty and Louis Weadook, New 
E York newspapermen, are writing Doug Falr- 
;.; banks' next Their offices are In a barn. 

■;""'\ Miss 1. A. R. Wylle, author, 1b visiting 
'■' Metro studios hereabouts, where Naztmova la 
Aiming her book, "The Hermit of Oaya." 

Robert Brunton is having the two open 
stages on his lot enolosed. He maintains the 
/enclosures are better for picture making. 

: Helen Cbadwlck will visit New Tork in 
September and then return to begin a five- 
year contract as leading woman for Qoldwyn. 






■■;... Jimmy Finn, who came West as Harry D. 
, j Kline's secretary, has- been appointed produo- 
•." :tlon head to succeed Brnest Trailer at the TJ. 

■■ William Farnum wUl make a picture in 
New Tork. He left last week and will be 

';," followed shortly by his director, 3. Gordon 

ivstaMt 

. r 



Margaret Greene, wife Of Albert Parker, 
Clara K. TouDg's dlreotor, has left for New 
Tork to appear at the Cort in the new Winston 
Churchill play. 

Hunt Stromberg, ex-director of the service 
and exploitation divisions of the Qoldwyn 
Pictures Corporation, Is now with the Belt- 
nick Arm In a similar capacity. 



Quy Price, motion picture and dramatlo 
editor of the Herald, was the first passenger 
to Catallna by airplane. He went over as the 
guest of 8yd Chaplin and Emery Rogers, 
I of the - 



owners 



be machine. 



Arch Reeve/ who left the snorting editor's 
desk at the L. A. Bxpress to publicize Famous 



Theodore Kosloff, the Russian dancer, will 
appear In pictures In the Famous Players' 
screen adaptation of "The Wanderer," Morris 
Oest's stage success. 



Players-Lasky stars has the local editors gasp- 
ing for space with the biggest "copy broad- 
side" witnessed In years. 



Sydney Cohen is a baseball bug. He /is out 
rooting for the Angels every day— ration, to 
the disgust of one Roscoe Fat Arbuckle, owner 
of the other Los Angeles team. " ".•_ 



William Prager, who used to be a juvenile 
with the TJ., Is bsck from the war. He was 
the first uniformed American to set foot In 
Amsterdam, Holland. He was a member of 
the Lyceum forces oversas. 

And friend husband, by the bye, was nearly 



tralnwreekcd t'other night en route home from 
Frisco, when the engine jumped the track. Bd 
Low* lost his coat rescuing fainting women, 
but Parker lost nothing— not even his sleep. 

Charles HerUman, last press representa- 
tive for Billot, Comstook ft Gest, has been 
placed In charge of the publicity at Uni- 
versal City. 

The Independent Productions, Inc., was In- 
corporated for (1,000,000 last week, with 
Robert W. Priest, William Buck and William 
J. arising on the Board of Directors. Mr. 
Priest Is not new to the film game, being the 
president of Film Market, Inc. Mr. Drifting 
Is the proprietor of a picture studio up state 
and Mr. Buck Is a wealthy lay manufacturer. 
The new corporation has engaged Virginia 
Pearson and her husband, Sheldon Lewis, for 
a period of five years. 



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... • ■ , .'• : -->. ';' " '■• ■" : ■ . •' ■ ; ■ 

Excerpt from Report of Censor T-34: 

**There appears to be nothing suspicious about 
this message. This bird Syd Chaplin is about to 
make a moving picture feature comedy in France. 
Believe me, when he does, I'm gonna see it. Code ' \ 

■.'■'■ -■>, ■ ■■' . •..'•':■> ' . ' ' , '•■ 






Book N-227 SS. pax vobiscum gives translation 
of Shah of Persia's message thus: 'Those Ameri- 
can exhibitors are lamoo, lamoo lucky who book— 



■ ;■•■ 



.': < •• 






SYDNEY CHAPLIN PRODUCTIONS 



II 



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FAMOUS HATERS -LASKY CC5RPORATION 




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80 



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MOVING 

CRITICIZING THE FILMS 



Play With Spiritual Impulse Has Wide Market Now, Says Maurice 

Tonmenr. Film Kutter Kuts in With a Few Slams, Ditto 

Independent Producer, Who Says Buying Man ufactur er s 

Are Confirmed Stauera. Hark Also to the 

Sabot Clatter of the Small Town Exhib. 



PICTU R E S 



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The subjoined contributions to VARIETY'S Film Information are voluntary submis- 
sions and are printed for what the% may be worth. Criticisms or complaints of any 
angle of films will be printed in this department from week to week when made by 
workers in any branch of the industry upon basis deemed worth while. 



Editor Varibtt: 

ils the National Board of Picture 
Manufacturers an organization for the 
preservation of something like bal- 
ance in the transaction of the busi- 
ness of its members, or is it merely 
an assembly of names that mean noth- 
ing? 

I am an 'independent picture pro- 
ducer, largely related to productions 
in the Los Angeles belts of the West 
I produce as many as five pictures per 
year, and have compounded as many 
as eight within a single twelve months. 

I am among those who believe that 
a picture may always be sold for the 
intrinsic value that its quality de- 
mands, and in the past before the sev- 
eral recent poolings of interests oc- 
curred, I could invariably get fairly 
consistent action whenever I came to 
New York with wares to market. 

But within the past year conditions 
appear to have changed. I go to the 
various independent buyers— all the 
big companies buy from lone makers, 
as everyone knows, and then label the 
products as their own — and I get 
scant, not. to say brutal, attention. If 
the market were gorged with picture 
material I could understand the hours 
I sometimes have to wait now for an 
appointment with this, that or some 
other head of the corporations I seek 
audience with, but everyone knows 
that the present supply of pictures 
is inadequate, at least in superior 
quality productions. 

The other day, after several prior 
calls, I had to wait two hours for an 
audience with the chief executive of 
a big corporation at 1600 Broadway, 
and when, after another half-hour's 
conference, I left this circulating pro- 
ducer, I was informed that. his firm 
would review the particular produc- 
tion that had inspired my call two 
days later. The hour was fixed, and 
I was enjoined not under any circum- 
stances to show the picture mean- 
while to anyone else. 

Prompt with the appointment, I ap- 
peared at the offices of the concern, 
to be abruptly apprised that circum- 
stances prevented a review of the pro- 
duction that day, but that I could, 
if I would bring it back at a later day 
and hour, which was named. I as- 
sented to this. When the time for 
the fulfillment of the second appoint- 
ment arrived, I was again informed 
that it would be impossible for the 
firm to see the picture that day, but 
that if I still desired to do business 
with them I might bring the produc- 
tion back on the following Tuesday at 
such and such an hour, when they • 
would positively look at the produc- 
tion. * 

Now it is to be understood that in 
the business of picture-making I am 
not unknown. Every production I 
have ever made I have sold eventually • 
at a profit big or small, and every pic- 
ture so sold has ridden out a profit- 
able course for the buyers and the 
exhibitors. I am a skilled judge of 
picture material, and familiar so far 
as one can be with the current trend 
of popular picture wants. 

My third call at the office named 



resulted in a third disappointment 
The picture could not be reviewed that 
day. Self-respect forbade me submit- 
ting to further discourtesy, and I went 
elsewhere seeking an outlet for my 
picture. 

Now, the incident indicated is but 
a sample of the common experiences' 
of men like myself who have no or- 
ganization inroads into attention. 
The experience I suffered at 1600 
Broadway with this one picture is but 
an echo of similar inconveniences and 
humiliating delays because of the in- 
consideration of the heads of the 
many picture concerns involved, and 
the list scarcely excepts three of 
twenty. 

My expenses, incurred for harbor- 
age in New York, necessarily at a 
hotel reflecting something of the 
quality of my standing, was no in- 
considerable item, during the pro- 
tracted delays. I had explained my 
personal situation to each of the men 
to whom I had applied for audience, 
and made clear that every day I was 
forced to remain in New York was 
not only a real monetary loss because 
of the local expenses involved, but 
because of the loss of time and pos- 
sible loss of quality my plans in the 
West were suffering through my 
lengthened stay in the East It took 
me the greater part* of five weeks be- 
fore I could finally unload the one 
picture of which I am speaking. 

Now, why cannot the N. B. of M. P. 
M. send out a suggestion to its mem- 
bers to be more reasonable in the 
time they waste of men whose pres- 
ence in the motion picture field is an 
absolute necessity for the preservation 
of their own equations? ■> 

Surely this is not an exacting re- 
quest. Surely it is as easy to tell a 
seller of negatives that an audience 
can be given, and no appointment 
made, as to make appointments that 
it is clear one never designed to be 
kept . 

If the picture in question had been 
seen and negotiations for its purchase 
because of price or quality could ex- 
plain a different point of view from 
the producer and the prospective 
agent, I could forgive the laxities. 

But the attitude of the manufac- 
turer-distributor generally seems one 
purely of rank carelessness of the 
normal rights of another human being 
whose activities are designed to help 
the very men who are so unnecessarily 
rude. 

Thanking you for any expression you 
may give my plaint, which may work 
for the benefit of many others like 
myself, 

I remain, yours truly, 

X. 

Editor Varibtt: 

Hey there, Varibtt, give us your 
mitt I Welcome for keeps. When 
some fellers told me the new thing 
you were pulling, I dug up the bum 
fountain pen a fill-um-up-again 
salesman gave me last January when 
»he was stinging me with— well, the 
name of the bet don't matter. But 
get busy, kid, and throw the big box 
letters at the manufacturers for the 
way their salesmen breeze into small 
towns and proceed to illustrate that 
the smart Aleck that used to be able 



to make a honest living at the shell 
game was a Simple Simon, Any bird 
in a small town that can think as fast 
as the' film salesmen who come in and 
take his clothes belongs right down 
in Film Center. Broadway. 

Say, the good old days of the coun- 
try fairs, when if you didn't watch 
your change at the blue wagon, it'd 
fade right out of your hand, were 
church socials for honesty compared 
with the rimming feasts these Captain 
Kidds pull off so many times a day 
that halt tne time they suffer from 
ongwee. 

But to cases, stop 'em from coming 
to me and needling me to the gills 
atfout a certain feature til! I can't get 
my money down fast enough, and then 
taking my deposit up the street to the 
picture joint I've sworn 111 put out of 
business, showing my deposit and my 
sig., and then getting more money for 
the picture, and mailing my deposit 
back to me by fast freight 

Stop the same brace game lot o" 
guerillas choking me up with peni- 
tence for scolding them about the way 
the films is when I go to pick 'em up 
by the fairy tale . explanations tbey 
give until they get some more new 
money, to let me discover later that I 
oughtnta believed the guy the .last ' 
time merely because he showed me a 
letter from William Fox that I think 
he musta writ himself. For the love 
of Angelina, don't no one tell the truth 
any more? Can't a fellow have 
troubles enough with the local janes 
that won't let this land of film or that 
ruin their children or their husbands 
without sticking the gaff into us from 
the rear? 

Let the mfrs. watch their salesmen 
closer, through some sort of check- 
back through the exchanges, let them 
give us the prints rewound and in good 
condition, so that the name of the 
average maker of films doesn't smell 
to heaven with the small time exhib- 
itor, who is used by the salesmen as a 
hey, rubel whenever the sucker crop 
thins out in the big dumps. 

H . R. A, t 
Yonkers. 

' v 

Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. &. 
Editor Varibtt: 

Thank you, Miss Variety— or is it 
Mr.?— for your.. new. symposium. A 
welcome harbor of refuge it must be 
for allot us wbq are striving to get 
the best there is out, of the cinema 
privilege of dramatic expression. 

I fell certain that none of us in the 
industry will abuse its good offices by 
seeking to make it the medium for 
recording desires that properly belong 
in the advertising departments, 
v A council table to which we may 
resort for a ventilation of points that 
no advertisement could so adequately 
elucidate must work for the eventual 
clarity of our cherished craft 

And how for the immediate inspira- 
tion of my own voice at this week's 
meeting: I wish to chat informally 
with authors, telling them of some 
particular things that stand as ob- 
stacles between their genius and the 
interpreting arteries of their creations 
—the directors— and hope, in turn, the 
writers will through your weekly op- 
portunities, talk as freely with me 
and my fellows in the directing field, 
so that thereby both branches may 
swiftly clear the barriers that cause 
so much unnecessary loss of time in 
the transaction of our ends of the 
business. 

I want scenarios. 

And I am but one voice among sev- 
eral hundred directors similarly 
plighted. Almost every other division 
of our industry is moving smoothly 
save this all important department. 
Writers there are aplenty, gifted with 
> visions that might entertain, excite, 
thrill and otherwise divert the multi- 
tudes that now find in the motion pic- 
ture play a satisfying form of erai- 
tianal excitant Directors tempera- 



mentally, emotionally, dramatically, 
poetically equipped to translate the 
visions of these writers there are too, 
in sufficient array. 

But the system of communication 
between the two factions is without 
order. Director So-and-So doesn't 
know where to get the special kind of 
material he seeks at the time he seek! 
it? Perhaps at the very moment of 
/his greatest anxiety in his search for 
the desired material, the identical ■ 
story or play he. wishes^-fiction carry- 
ing the thought he wishes to trans- 
late—is knocking unheard at count- 
less other doors which at that particu- 
lar moment are not interested in that 
particular kind of play. 

How may such a condition be cor-: 
rected? I am sure I myself do not 
know. Many ways suggest themselves, 
but it would require more space than 
I feel privileged to employ at a single 
writing to outline even the more in- 
teresting of # these. Perhaps your 
readers of this new department who 
are authors or directors might aid 
with suggestions that may finally chart 
the courses for all clearly— writers 
and directors. 

lust now I am seeking manuscripts 
with, perhaps, a finer poetic appeal 
than is generally considered the best 
market material at this post-war pe^ 
riod I, personally, feel sure that hu- 
man consciousness is at a stage when 
no play or story can err that reflects 
the eternal sublimity of spiritual 
truths. I do not mean religious truths, 
but that something, that is the mentor 
of every soul, that other person that 
is in every one of us, that voice whose 
messages are conveyed to us often in 
actual words that come in articulate 
whispers to our brains or our hearts, 
messages that direct our steps, if we be 
receptive, to the higher things of the 
spirit rather than the sordid desires 
of the flesh. No more dramatic char- 
acter has been conceived in all the 
writings of man than that of the Sav- 
iour. Dismissing absolutely any rela- 
tion that the Messiah may have to 
creeds, the story of this one Man's 
sensitive understanding of the human 
heart and its countless vagaries, is and 
must ever be the one great drama of all 
time. Transcendently beautiful in all 
its aspects of pity, fortitude, sacrifice,, 
patience, courage, who will say that it 
did not inspire Hugo to give us that 
big and powerful modern reflex of 
- human life in its passage through 
life in the places and at the times the 
French author circumstanced his char- 
. acters ? The story of Jesus is a drama 
of suffering, a play of infinite appeal, 
with forgiveness, charity, pity, humil- 
ity, intermingled in its phases and with 
beauty of the tincture that magically 
inspires all ennobling thoughts, am- 
bitions and desires— its guardian angel. 
It is of plays that have an underly- 
ing understanding of the great spir- 
itual stratas that vibrate and quiver, 
beneath the whole structure of human 
kind that sincere directors speak when 
they say they are in need of plays of 
spiritual appeal. The physical matter 
of the dramas they desire may be as 
blood-curdling as the most sanguinary 
melodramatist may conceive, if be- 
neath this physical conflict will be 
found logically interwoven something 
of man's pity for his fellow man, the 
right of every human creature to fair 
shares in the world's happiness, the. 
concession that to the humblest of 
God's children may come moments of 

freat exaltation, instances when Bill 
ykes may become divine in a spirit- 
ualizing of his love for Nancy, when 
the bishop in the Hugo gallery of un- 
fortunates reflected God himself in his 
tenderness for the outcast who had 
robbed him. 

Give us plays of the spirit as well as 
of the body, another "Bluebird," if you 
will, another "My Lady's Dress,** an- ; 
other "Daddy Long Legs," another 
"Prunella 1" • 

Maurice T**n+w. 



c . ■ . 

MOVING 



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PICTURES 



:.■"' 81 



AGAINST BREAKING STRIKE 
HERE WITH MOTION PICTURES 



Board of National Association of Motion Picture Industry 

Adopts Resolution at Meeting. Requests Affiliated 

Producers Not to Rent Films to Theatres 

Closed by Striking Actors. Fear 

That Such Action Would 

Involve Industry. 



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At a special meeting of the Board of 
' Directors of the National. Association 
of the Motion Picture Industry held in 
: the Times Building Aug. 20, the Pro- 
ducers and Distributor Division were 
requested to clarify their position 
•regarding the resolution adopted Aug. 
6, which aligned the National Asso- 
ciation with the legitimate, vaudeville 
and burlesque interests, in a defensive 
and offensive formation, in the event 
of a strike by the Equity Association. 
The Board submitted the following 
resolution to the Producers and Dis- 
tributors Division for action: 

That in case efforts are , 
made to keep open the theatres 
affected by said strike with 
motion pictures that all distrib- 
uting organizations affiliated 
with the National Association 
of the Motion Picture Industry 
are hereby requested not to in- 
volve the motion picture indus- 
try by such sales or leases." 
The Board will also take action on a 
request from Carl Laemmle of the Uni- 
versal, ' regarding an alleged boycott 
instituted against certain releases by 
'the Northwest Board of Trade. \ 

FILM RIVAL TO STATE-LAKE. I 

Chicago, Aug. 20. 
Balaban & Katz announce plans for 

f ,>' new theatre to be built on State 
street, opposite the State-Lake Thea- 

, tre. Negotiations for the site have 
been completed by a group of local 
capitalists headed by Morris Rosen- 

rwald. 

. The new house, an "L" shaped struc- 

^ture, will frpnt on State street, across 
the alley from the Masonic Temple, 
and on Lake street. The Lake street 
frontage has been secured by a long 

• term lease. The State street frontage 
has been purchased outright by the 
promoters of the theatre. It will prob- 
ably play a straight film policy. 



EXHIBITORS DEMAND SHARE. 

Roaring their heads off where the 
bargaining price is elastic, the exhib- 
itors who turn the New York ex- 
changes of filmdom into vocal boiler 
;■ factories, trying to climb in some way 
^6n the new cutting-the-cost wrinkle 
) being practiced by some - manufac- 
turers recently of making their legiti- 
mately good dramatic productions pass 
in some of their exterior scenes where 
this, that or some other big national 
proprietary article for public consump- 
tion can gumshoe into the background 
with an ad. <.'. 

v With a low estimate of 10,000,000 
people looking at pictures every 
day, and a considerable part of this 
number bound to see the displayed 
features containing the K. & K. corset 
or the F. & F. Boiled Ham legend, the 
manufacturers of commodities hith- 
erto confining their advertising to 
highway posters and newspaper an- 
nouncements are digging more and 
/more into the new game of telling the 
people what it is all about through the 
films that at the same time hold the 
': breathless attention of the lookers-on 
with great dramatic situations. 
jf The exhibitors' kick against this 
extra r»ke-off on which he is not de- 
"'-red in, is aimed at present at the 



films carrying repeatedly the adver- 
tisements of one of the country's big 
beverage Advertisers, an article that 
used to be advertised yearly at a gross 
disbursement through the newspapers 
of a quarter million dollars, but which 
is now being advertised solely through 
photoplays. 

Kicking also at the same time along 
the same lines are the same exhibitors 
against the fast growing inroads of 
the educational industrials supplied 
exhibitors . without charge, and made 
so cohesive and often attractive that 
they are good enough to figure as op- 
position against the paid-for and often 
costly features that exhibitors who 
refuse to show the industrials have to 
buck. . ■, 

CAST IN BLACKFACE. 

Bobby Burns is to be featured in a 
series of Cuckoo Comedies, to he pro- 
duced by Mark M. Dittenfass, under 
Will Lewis' direction. The entire cast 
is to appear in blackface, which is an 
innovation in film cbmedies. 

Julia Ralston, Fatty Filbert gnd 
Skinny Renfrew will be in the sup- 
porting cast. 



DICKEY? VALUATION. 

In his damage suit against the Mu- 
tual Film Corporation, Paul Dickey, 
the playwright, testifying before Ref- 
eree William Klein, placed a monetary 
value of $10,000 on his one-act playlet, 
|The Come-Back," in which he toured 
in vaudeville some seasons back for 
over a year, and which he later ex- 
panded into a three-act play, but 
which was turned down by producers 
owing to the fact that the defendant 
corporation, the Mutual people, had 
produced a five-reel motion picture 
feature under the same title, "The 
Come-Back," thus "killing" its value 
as the title of a legitimate play. 

Through Nathan Burkan, Dickey 
had entered suit in the Supreme Court 
for proper redress, the judge award- 
ing him an Accounting of the film 
company's play'of the same name. On 
the Mutual's -appeal, the accounting 
item was discounted by the Appellate 
Division, and a. referee appointed in- 
stead. Mr. Klein is to determine the 
amount of damages due the plaintiff. 
He has rendered no decision pending 
Mr. Dickey's producing of certain wit- 
nesses who are well versed in the 
monetary value of legit and vaude- 
ville plays adapted for the screen. 
The hearing was therefore postponed 
until a later date. 



SEVERAL FILM COMEBACKS. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 

It seems that all the old screen fa- 
vorites who have been "out" are at- 
tempting to come back. Doris Pawn 
seems the most successful to date. 
The blond actress was absent from 
the screen for two years, but Louis J. 
Gasnier sponsored her return to the 
silver sheet, and now, having finished 
as one of Lew Cody's female leads, she 
is going to be featured. Florence Tur- 
ner, the erstwhile Vitagraph star, is 
writing, directing and starring in a 
series of one-reel comedies at the U, 
in which she plays almost all the roles. 
Dorcas Matthews, "Bob" McKim's 
wife, has been co-featured with him 
in "Yesterday," an independent six- 
reeler. \ , 

King Baggott is being "brought 
back" by Louis Burston in a serial 
vehicle He is on the ..local Rialto now 
in a Metro product called "The Man 
Who Stayed at Home," but his recep- 
tion hasn't been any too warm. Louise 
Glaum is coming back strong under 
the Ince banner and "Sahara" proved 
it could be done. Edith Roberts is 
back with Universal and is being di- 
rected by Worms n Dawn. Ruth Oif- 
ford, formerly a U star, is Earle Wil- 
liams' leading woman after having 
passed out of sight for several months. 

FOX BUYS DENVER HOUSES. < 

f- Denver, Aug. 20/ 

It was announced here yesterday 
that William Fox has purchased four 
Denver theatres: Rivoli, Isis, Strand 
and Plaza. 

One million dollars .is said to be 
involved. 

Fox representatives have 1 been here 
all week. 

L. B. Brown and A. F. Megahan, 
former owners of the houses, are re- 
ported ready to invest four million 
dollars in a Broadway, New York, 
theatrical enterprise. 

HALF MILLION FOR RELEASES. 

London, Aug. 30. 

Grangers Exclusives has . purchased 
the entire output of Samuelsons, who 
is coming to New York for this year, 
paying $500,000. 

Samuelsons release one fortnightly. 

TOO EXPENSIVE ABROAD. 

London, Aug. 20. 

The company headed by Eddie Polo, 
that came over here to film a large 
number of episodes for their big serial 
for Universal, returns home very much 
dissatisfied. They have discovered, by 
actual experience, that it is costing 
nearly five times as much here what 
' it does to do similar work in Los An- 
geles, due to the bad light and a con- 
sequent loss of time, slow and in- 
competent carpenters and other work- 
ing people, etc 

For the remainder of their stay they 
will confine themselves only to taking 
exteriors and will complete the serial 
at the coast 



A. ft H. Lease Strand, Sacramento. 
San Francisco, Aug. 20. 

Ackerman & Harris have taken a 
ten-year lease on the Strand Theatre 
in Sacramento. The house will be re- 
modeled by the owners at an expense 
of $50,000. 

The'Strand, with a seating capacity 
of 1,800, will show pictures and special 
musical attractions. 



Leah B&ird'e Lateit. 
Augustus Thomas' play, "The Capi- 
tol," which Had a long Broadway run 
a number of years ago, is to be made 
into a picture by Artco. Leah Baird 
will star and George Irving will direct 
it. 



SUIT AROUSES FILM WORLD. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 

Considerable comment followed the 
news that several noted film figures 
had been named defendants in the suit 
brought by the Shuberts against mem- 
bers of the Actors' Equity. Number- 
less screen folk belong to the organi- 
zation, but the great majority have 
paid slight attention to the activities 
of the association since their arrival 
in Southern California, although, still 
retaining their membership. Owing 
to this peculiar situation they are not 
inclined to take the litigation seriously 
since they do not feel they are per- 
sonally interested in the war between 
the association and the managers. If . 
it came to a showdown, however, ac- 
cording to various producers and ac- 
tors here, they would fight the issue 
out in the courts. ■'. 

In an interview Cecil B. DeMille said 
the conditions are so vastly different 
in pictures from the stage that there,, 
is" little or no likelihood that filmdom 
will be affected by current happenings 
in the spoken drama. 

"I have spoken to numerous promi- 
nent actors in motion pictures since 
the first rumors began circulating" 
said Famous Players-Lasky's director- 
general, "and I have been assured by 
them in all sincerity, that they were 
not in sympathy with such a step as 
a rumored walkout and they feel cer- 
tain no such action is being seriously 
considered." 

Other noted producers said pr ac t ic- 
ally the same thing. 



"...vW; 
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BRENON'S CONNECTION. ' 
London, Aug. 20. 

Herbert Brenon is still in Italy, 
where he has made an important con- 
nection with the gigantic Italian film 
trust and will produce for that organ- 
ization. ' 

Marie Doro has also been engaged by 
the trust to star for them in native- 
made productions of large magnitude, 
directed by Brenon, and designed for 
exploitation throughout the world. 

The London Independent Film Trad- 
ing Co. has secured the rights to these 
productions for the United Kingdom. 

I 
"Yanke* Doodle" Moving, 
'"Yankee Doodle in Berlin" closes at 
'Moss' Broadway Sunday night after 
eight weeks' run and opens at the Mon- 
tauk, Brooklyn, Monday, for two 
weeks. 

Following the Montauk date, 
"Yankee Doodle" will make a trip over 
Subway" circuit 



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WANTED 

Motion Picture Cameras 

In A-l condition. Suitable for n«wi or field work: 
400-foot tapadtr. Complete with trtpode. cues, eto. 
HUAeet price* peitL Aiinm FOXNCWS. ISO Wert 
«tth St, New York CKy. 




I 






DIRECTOR 

FOX-SUNSHINE 
FEATURE COMEDIES 

FlrJt Tiro Releaiwr «... 

"School House Scandal"— "Sheriff Tell's Comeback" 

Starring POLLY MOBAN 



EDDIE CLINE 



INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 
THEATRICAL and MOTION PICTURE INDUSTRY 



RJS8 1 






Samuel: 





WiWM fSBPPlS Iffil 



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MOVING PICTURE DEPARTMENT—PAGES 75 TO 82 

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PLENTY 



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NOW FOUND 



BY ACT ORS IN LOS ANGELES 

Vincent Serrano Goes Out There to Make One Production. He 

It Deluged With Other Offers. Same Experience Met 

'With by Other Trained Players. Living 

Inexpensive. Even Extras Are Scarce. 

Colony Becoming Religious. 



v. 



Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
' If some considerable part of a thou- 
sand actors and actresses who have 
been gorging the* strike zone streets 
of theatrical Manhattan could be 
transported bodily to these picture 
making precincts the New York man- 
agers would find their forces crippled, 
whether they win or lose in the pres- 
ent conflict, for any worth-while play- 
er who comes here seeking employ- 
ment gets more work than he can ac- 
cept. 

Vincent Serrano's case is but one of 
countless instances where the same sit- 
uation is revealed in regard to the big- 
name mummer. Serrano came for one 
production and before he had finished 
this single picture found himself con- 
fronted with many attractive offers 
from sundry other producing concerns. 

The section never was so prosperous 

for any. one willing to pitch in and 

.keep busy, and money was never so 

free for things that the producers 

want. 

More than 15 new companies have 

taken up their headquarters here for 

" the production of pictures within the 

past ten weeks, and every day or so 

finds some new inquiry from picture 

.makers for facilities for getting busy. 

The field just now is a bonanza for 
carpenters and skilled and unskilled 
artisans of all sorts. 
. Living is reasonably inexpensive, and, 
.taken altogether, save for those who 
cannot live without the effluvia of 
the only Broadway, is a paradise. 

The old days when picture extras 
here were so numerous that it was 
■} pitiable how many one could count, 
eager to get out and hack East— to 
some place where the supply of M. P. 
players did not so excessively blanket 
the demand, are no more, and with 
the increasing number of producers 
and the bigger demand for men and 
women in many other fields, it 'looks 
as though the surplus employe market 
here wouldn't return, at least not for 
a long while. 

Peculiarly noticeable since the close 
01 the war is the new social and semi- 
religious spirit prevading almost all 
ranks of the California cinema work- 
ers. Christian Science has gained 
among the many colonies, and if some 
of the former decriers of the conduct 
of the 'many filmvilles dotting these 



regions were to visit them now r they^ 
would surely be justified in shipping 
back here at least a carload of halos 
for everyday use, with the sizes ad- 
justed nicely to the craniums of some 
of our biggest local film folk. 



MISS BARA DIGNIFIED. 

The facts concerning Theda Bara's 
salary and the reasons for her leaving 
the employ of Fox were learned this 
week. The last contract entered into 
by Miss Bara-and the Fox people was 
signed May 26, 1919. By the terms of 
this contract Miss Bara was entitled 
to receive and did receive for the en- 
tire year* commencing May 26, 1917, 
and ending Majr 25, 1918, the sum of 
$3,000 per week,, and from .that date 
on she received $4,000 a week. In ad- 
dition to this salary she received a 
.percentage on the sales of pictures 
in which she appeared. . 

Miss Bara left Fox because she did 
not wish to appear any longer in 
"vamp" pictures. She wanted a say in 
the choice of stories and particularly 
as to titles. She is determined to make 
her future appearances in dignified 
plays with dignified names. 



STUDIO FOR UNITED. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
Los Angeles is to have .another new 
studio for the accommodation . of five 
prominent screen stars, according: to 
Lee A. Ochs, vice-president of the 
United Theatres of America, Inc.; who 
is here, awaiting the arrival of J. A. 
Berst, president of United. New stars 
have been engaged by Berst and three 
luminaries in addition to Dustin Far- 
num and Florence Reed will scon be 
shooting here at the head of their sev- 
eral companies. 



RIESENFELD'S MUSICAL SHOW. 

Hugo Riesenf eld, director of the Ri- 
voli and Rialto theatres, will be the 
composer of a- new musical show 
Stewart and Morrison are to produce 
this fall. 

Harry B. Smith supplied the book 
and lyrics. No title has been given 
the production. 



.SCREEN ADVERTISING. 

A determined attempt will be made 
next month by picture people, act- 
ing through the Screen Advertisers' 
Association, to jam into the minds of. 
advertising men generally the value of 
appealing to the public purse through 
the , -screen.- They will make this at- 
tempt at the convention of the Asso- 
ciated Advertising Clubs of the World 
in New Orleans Sept. 21-25. 

The chief matter for discussion at 
this convention will be how advertis- 
ing men can best help to reconcile 
capital and labor. 

A picture illustrating this very idea 
is being prepared and those backing 
it. among whom is Harry Levey, presi- 
dent of I the Screen Advertisers' Asso- 
ciation,! feel that it shAild convince 
the 17,000 "ad" men wHS will attend 
the convention that the picture, as a 
means of publicity, is something that 
cannot be overlooked. 



LEW STONE IN PICTURES. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
A bombshell exploded on the local 
Rialto when it leaked out that Lewis 
S Stone was planning to quit the Ma- 
jestic stock company to star in a 
Mickey Neilan production, "Bob 
Hampton of Placer." 



Stone'i Plans Depend on Strike. 
Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
Lewis S. Stone leaves the Majestic 
within a month. If the strike is set- 
tled by that time he will return to 
Broadway. Otherwise he will star in 
Marshall Neilan pictures. 



Poll's New House in New Haven. 

Arrangements for what promises to 
be the largest picture house in New 
England were completed this week by 
S. Z. Poli. It will be a new house in 
New Haven. 

Ground will be broken- next week. 
The cost is estimated at over $1,000,000. 



_-TW0 PICTURES BARRED. 

The License Bureau, New York, sent 
out notice this week forbidding the 
showing of "The Solitary Sin" and "It 
May Be Your Daughter." 

The License Bureau placed its official 
ban on the two pictures, following an 
examination. The letter forbidding the 
showing of the pictures contained the 
following statement signed by Deputy 
Commissioner James F. Geraghty: 
"The exhibition of any of the above- 
mentioned films will be considered 
summary cause for the revocation of 
the license of the theatre in which the 
exhibition takes place." 

"The Solitary Sin" treats of a sub- 
ject of a private nature. . "It May Be 
Your Daughter" is a sex picture on the 
White .Slave order. 



JACK PICKFORD WITH GOLDWYN. 

A contract was closed early this week 
for Jack Pickford to become a star 
under the Goldwyn banner. His con- 
tt act is for a period of three years and 
under it he is to receive $10,000 a pic- 
ture. 



HARRY GRIFFIN STRONG DIES. 

Rochester, N. Y., Aug. 20.: ; - 
Henry Griffin Strong, son of the late 
Henry Alvah Strong, original partner 
of George Eastman and president of 
the Eastman Kodak Co., died in Los 
Angeles last Wednesday from acute 
nephritis, following an attack of in- 
fluenza. He had been ill for some time. 
Upon completing a course at the Uni- 
versity of Rochester, Mr. Strong 
studied for two years at the scientific: 
school of Yale University and then 
entered the employ of the Eastman 
Kodak Company. In recent years, 
however, he had devoted himself to 
the automobile industry, being inter- 
ested in a number of concerns. 

His father, Henry Alvah Strong, died 
only two weeks ago. 



QUINN COMES EAST. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
J. A. Quinn is en route east again j 
with a new chip on his shoulder. He 
says he is going to put his Theatrical 
and Picture Association across at all 
costs and claims he has the support of 
several United States Senators in his 
proposed lecture compaign in Wash- 
ington. It is known that Quinn's Rial- . 
to, one of the finest photo places here- 
abouts, is on the market 



BLACK WELL OPENS NEW STUDIO 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. 
Carlyle Blackwell has begun work 
on his first production, in which Gloria 
Hope has the female lead. Blackwell 
is filming in a new Hollywood studio 
built by John Jasper, formerly man- 
ager of Charlie ; Chaplin. The plant 
is built on unit lines and was financed 
by Hollywood capitalists. It is one 
of the best and biggest in this terri- 
tory. Blackwell plans, ' however, to 
make o>nly one picture before return- 
ing to the East, where he will produce 
his second, after which he says he 
will make Los Angeles his permanent 
picture home. 



SEEK TO BAN FILM. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 20. * 
An effort is being made to ban the 
film "Injustice," a negro propaganda 
film with an all-darkey cast. The 
Philanthropy and Civic Clubs are 
prosecuting the campaign. The film 
was produced by Capt. Leslie T. Pea- 
cocke, and is at Ray's Garden The- 
atre. 



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GETTING NIGHT EFFECTS. 

R. William Neill, who is directing 
the forthcoming production of "The 
Bandbox," in which Doris Kenyon is 
starring, is going to avoid the criti- 
cism shot at many directors recently 
that their night scenes were taken in 
daylight and create no illusion. Neill 
has been causing no end of,excitement 
by setting up powerful Kliegl lights in 
Central Park and other outdoor loca- 
tion j near this city, and shooting his 
night scenes at night 



'■•: 



- 




VARIETY 



TLO 



RENDELandBERT 

IN THEIR OWN ACT 

Waiting for Her" 




Pauline Saxon 

SI 

PERKINS' 

KID 



The Mark Bros, are 

singing Jack Mills' 
big hit, 

"/ Don't Want a Doctor, All I 
Want Is a Room of 

- . ■ - ■ 

HOTEL JOYCE 

tl W. flat St, Central Park Wert, N. T. C. 



DAVE HARRIS 

A Brand New Single 

headed for the top of the 
ladder and g oing strong 

Writer of "Room 202" 



Direction: 

IRVING COOPER 



HARRY W. 



JOB 



CONN and WHITING 

VARIOUS FEATS 
WITH THE FEET 

SPECIAL SCENERY 

Picked up some new moves while in 
Russia with 339th Inf. 

WARDROBE BY SUE TALMAGE 

Direction, SAM BAERWITZ 



JOHN-NT 



FRANCIS 



and 
RENE 

WILSON 

in 
"A SURPRISE" 

BOOKED SOLID 
on 

LOEW CIRCUIT 

MANAGEMENT: 
SAMUEL BAERWITZ 



"CHUD" 



"ROLUE" 



Blough and Lockard 

(IN BLACKFACE) 

FEATURED COMEDIANS 

With KELLY FIELD PLAYERS 

Headlining- Pantages Circuit 



FRED DUPREZ 




Starring In "Mr. 

Manhattan" In 

England. 

Now York Bopr.t 

BAM. BAERWITZ 

Mil Bread war 

Leaden Ropr.t 

M UBRAY * DAW 

I. LUe St, W.C 1 




■MRU 

CLARKE 

and SAM. 

LA VERE'S 

FRIEND MAGGIE BEZ: 

Our new preacher In bla flrtt ser- 
mon, liat Sundij. at Cucumber 
Junction, said: "Save sonttrilne tor 
a rainy day." 1 think be would 
hare pleased the thirsty (segrega- 
tion much better If be would ban 
•aid: "Save something for a dry 
day." 

But of course you know how It li 
with me. Timmle! 

Just played Temple, Syracuse. 
K Y. 

Critic said: "Marie Clarke as "His 
Friend Maggie, 1 with Sari I* Ten 
who took bis aooordeoo Orer the 
Top at SL Mlhlel. is a hit After 
an absence of more than a year, the 
vehicle bas lost none of its enter- 
taining powers." 

Direction, FRANK EVANS 

Hello. Bylvester and Vance. 



BRADLEE 



MARTIN 



AND 
JESSIE 



COURTNEY 

PLAYING LOEW TIME 
European enragements to follow. 
MANAGEMENT: 

Irving COOPER Joe 



MERCEDES 

727 IRVING PARK BLYD. 

Telepbene: Wellington 10251 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Mile. Liiigarde 

EUROPEAN POSEUSE 
PLASTIQUE NOVELTY 

Direction PETE MACK 



STEVE JUHASZ 

PRESENTS 

Boila and Co 

IN A 

DAINTY SONG AND 

DANCE DIVERTISEMENT 

Featuring TWNETTE the 
American Dancing Girl 

DIRECTION: 
BEEHLER & JACOBS 



THE FAYNES 

Fuller Circuit, Australia 



LILLIAN DE VERE 

The Girl with a Volco 
Direction. EARL & YATES 



HOME 

for a real vacation 
: with our two kiddies 

JIM and MARIAN » 

HARKINS 

Din, NORMAN JEFFERIES 



OSWALD 




THE BROOKLYN SUBWAY 
or the 

HUDSON TUBES 

which 1b 

«*THE 
BETTER 'OLE"? 

COOK and O ATM AN 
Loew Circuit Direction— MARK LEVY 



MODERN SUNDAY WARFARE 
or 

"The Battle of $17.86" 

A "Pro Rata" Sunday is 
All Work and No Play 

While a ♦•Benefit" is 
AH Work and No Pay. 

TED HEALV 
Mois Time Direction— MARK LEVY 



Cat* of 

• ■ " 

Rawson 
and Clare 

Auburndale, 
Lot 



LITTLE JERBY am I: yoa all knew 
met 
| am vaudeville 1 . "Mil. of Mirth." 

Three feet tall, I » classy and Beat* 

T heath the olio of a kid, have a voice 
yon eaat beat. 
■ ota of ways there are te reeea fame— 

■ffntortalnlnf Is my middle name. 

laetl* foatnred wherever t Mare 

Everywhere from the Ceaat to Brood, 
way. 
Beeegnlatd aruet, no alranj-sr to fame. 

Bully, why aahT yen oil know my 

YenrfSnU, a "Mite of aDrte." UTTU 
JERK i , 



Ben Hassan 

Presents Himself and the 

Ben Hassan Troupe 

Di A COMIC 

WHIRLWIND SENSATION 

W. V. ht. A. Time 
DIrectI on— HELEN MURPHY 



(INEZ) 



(GEORGIA) 



(ALICE) 



PATTONJAJmSa-dROONEY 

"THREE GIRLS FROM HARMONYLAND" 

SUCCESSFULLY TOURING PANTAGES CIRCUIT 



MABEL WHITMAN and DIXIE BOYS 

BOOKED 25 WEEKS . 

WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 

Direction, HARRY SPINGOLD 



ED ALLEN and TAXIE 



A LITTLE TOUCH OF HIGH LIFE— INTRODUCING 
THE WORLD'S BEST rr. i VIE DIRECTION: 

EDUCATED DOG 1 AAIE* PETE MACK 



HATTIE 

for a dime — at the Cretona this last half (August 
See it — a sensational novelty. 



The girl that gets a 
million dollar?' 

,ef 

worth of clc' 



1 



EDW. HILL 

IS MY DADDY 



BRUCE r 



UBERT CARLTON 



ft 



THE BL^ 



r 



Booked over the entire Loew Circuit. 



Personal Representative, Bob Baker. 



Tlv 



M 
•St 



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• $ .. . >4# ■ 



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■X . A . ^j T ^? ^^ ^^ - . . l' ■ '>!'.:■*• 










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A New Agent for New Acts 

SUITE 1211-1212- 









1213 MASONIC TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. 



•v "''.'""'■''.'''.■■ •'■•'''■;" •""; 




MY EXCLUSIVE EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE IS 



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IN* 

.;. ; 



!:•■•■ 



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BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH||^ : ';;- 



^heatre Building, New York City 



B. F. Keith Vaudeville Exchange 
Orpheum Circuit, Western 
, Vaudeville Managers* Assn. 



and Affiliations 



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- 

:■■■'- •.:■' 
■ ,■' ' ■■ ■■. 



VAUDEVILLE^ 



BHgpraggc^^^V: ■ 



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;■.-■ 

V. ■■' 

■■■ 



THEATRICAL INTERESTS COMBINE 
TO COPE WITH EXPECTED STRIKE 

Producing Managers Association Formulating Plan of Action 

Similar to Measures Employed by V. M. P. A. in Dealing 

with White Rats Strike. Bill Oviatt to Direct 

Managers Organization. Sunday Pay and 

Standard Contract Still at Issue. 






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Notwithstanding the holding of an 
informal conference between repre- 
sentatives of the Producing Mana- 
gers' Assn. and Actors' Equity Assn. 
Monday afternoon, with another get- 
to-gether meeting scheduled for Wed- 
nesday, the managers took steps this 
week to meet a general strike situa- 
tion expected to obtain in New York, 
Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston, 
within the next few weeks, unless the 
present controversy is adjusted. 

In preparing to meet a strike situa- 
tion the managers are proceeding along 
the lines followed by the Vaudeville 
Managers' Protective Assn. preceding 
and during the White Rats strike in 
1916. 

On Wednesday, representatives of 
the Producing Managers' Assn., Vau- 
deville Managers' Protective Assn., 
Columbia Amusement Co. (burlesque 
interests) and the Natl Assn. of the 
Motion Picture Industry, embracing 
the four fields of theatricals, met and 
upon the formal resolution of Wm. A. 
Brady, formed an affiliation. If trouble 
should come, this affiliation will resolve 
itself into an offensive and defensive 
alliance. 

Bill Oviatt was appointed as direct- 
ing chief of the managerial interests 
Monday. Oviatt, whose position cor- 
responds to that held by Pat Casey, 
in the V. M. P. A, will also co-operate 
in the building up of the newly formed 
Actors' Co-operative Assn. 

The P. M. A. will also have the 
co-operation ad advice of E. F. Albee, 
head of the Keith Exchanges. Mr. Al- 
bee attended a meeting of the P. M. A. 
held recently and is understood to have 
outlined several plans of procedure 
that will be followed by the managers 
if a strike develops. 
"^A mass meeting of the A. E. A. was 
scheduled for the Hotel Astor Thurs- . 
day afternoon at 3.30. This meeting 
was called for the purpose of acting 
on any concessions or propositions 
made by the P. M. A. at the conference 
Wednesday afternoon. 

The points at issue according to 
Frank Gillmore involve two major dif- 
ferences. 1st, the payment foe, Sundav 
shows: 2nd, the issuance of U. M. P. 
A.-A. E. A. Standard contracts: Sam 
Harris stated Monday he wis not in 
a position to say whether the trouble 
would be adjusted, but made it plain 
that the P. M. A would never consent 
to do business with any 'organization 
with which Harry Mountford, James 
W. Fitzpatrick or Francis Wilson was 
connected. This would seem to com- 
plicate the situation to an extent that 
would absolutely prevent the managers 
and actors getting together, inasmuch 
as the A E. A. in order to meet the 
condition outlined by Harris would be 
forced to quit the Associated Actors 
and Artistes of America. This, Frank 
Gillmore positively declared Wednes- 
day afternoon, the Actors' Equity 
would never consent to, as it would 
affect the A. E A. affiliation with the 
American Federation of Labor. 

Conciliatory efforts have also been 
made by Howard Kyle, head of the 
hew Actors' Co-operative Assn. -to ef- 
fect an agreement between the war- 
ring elements. Kyle, while sponsor- 
ing the new organization, according 
to Frank Gillmore, has not tendered 
his resignation in the Actors* Equity 
and Is still a member in good stand- 
ing. Other well known actors who 
have been trying to bring about a set- 



tlement are De Wolf Hopper, Donald 
Brian, Chas. Coburn and Brandon Ty- 
nan. All of the foregoing attended 
the Monday afternoon conference be- 
tween the A & A and the P. M. A 
at the soliciation of the managers, ac- 
cording to an A £ A. official. 

John Drew and E. H. Sothern both 
sent communications to the Actors' 
Equity this week, pledging loyalty to 
the organization and commending the 
A E. A. on its present stand against 
the managers. 

Mr. Gillmore stated Wednesday af- 
ternoon the A. E. A had made no plans 
to call out the members of any pro- 
duction now rehearsing or playing, 
and ho such orders would be issued 
at least until the conference slated for 
the present week had been held. 

The managers' association seemed to 
be trying an extensive campaign of 
propaganda following the "Chu Chin 
Chow affair, but the propaganda por- 
tion was so apparent it carried no 
weight. The managers also appeared 
to be in difficulty how to start the pro- 
posed Co-operative Actors' Associa- 
tion, stamping that proposal so clear- 
ly as a managerial move that little at- 
tention was given it. 

On the other hand all members of 
the A. E. A. did not appear to be in 
accord with the moves of their society, 
but other than expressing a personal 
opinion on the matters, let it alone 
without thought of giving up their A 
E. A. membership. 

One manager with a production out 
stated he could see no objection to 
the Standard form of contract for uni- 
versal usage among managers— that 
he bad used them and considered the 
contracts to be fair enough for all the 
show business. Conditions, however, 
prevented the manager from making 
public this comment. 

Following two solid hours of fiery 
speechmaking, including a violent 45- 
minute denunciation of the Producing 
Managers' Assn., Vaudeville Managers' 
Protective, Assn., the Keith interests 
and the entire managerial clan in gen- 
eral by James W. Fitzpatrick, at the 
mass meeting of the Associated Actors' 
and Artistes of America, in the Hotel 
Astor Friday afternoon, the organiza- 
tion finally got down to business and 
adopted a resolution "pledging them- 
selves to confer upon their respective 
Councils the right to give authority to 
the International Board of Associated 
Actors . and Artistes of America, to 
formulate such plans and make such 
agreements with other organized labor 
bodies in the amusement world as will 
lead to co-operative action among all 
such bodies." 

Stripped of its parliamentary phras- 
ing the resolution means that the Four 
A's International Board has been em- 
powered to go ahead and form an of- 
fensive alliance against the managers 
with the stage hands and musicians, 
without first submitting the matter to 
members of the organizations such as 
the Actors' Equity, Hebrew Actors, 
etc. (constituting the, various units of 
the Four A's), oroviding of course that 
the I. A. T. S. E. and American Federa- 
tion of Musicians are willing to enter 
into such an alliance. 

Another resolution was adopted de- 
claring that "the representatives and 
members of the several branches here 
represented do hereby pledge devotion, 
service and sacrifice to the cause of the 
actor and guarantee the loyalty of its 



members to the American Federation 
of Labor" and "be It further resolved 
that we pledge ourselves to confer up- 
on our respective Councils authority, 
to make and enforce such rules, con- 
trolling and governing the action of 
individual members of the several 
branches to give 100 per cent, force and 
effect to the above resolution." 

This resolution evidently is intended 
to keep members of the Actors' Equity 
in line should a strike situation de- 
velop. 

The Grand Ball Room of the Astor 
held about 1,200 actors when Francis 
Wilson, ' president of the Four A's, 
called the meeting to order ( shortly 
after 2 P. M. The gathering consisting 
almost wholly of the type of actors and 
actresses who play minor _ parts in 
legit productions with a sprinkling of 
White Rats. Frank Gillmore apparent- 
ly sought, to explain this when he 
stated that rehearsals had been hur- 
riedly called by the managers for Fri- 
day afternoon to put a crimp in the 
attendance at the meeting. 

Preceding Mr: Wilson's opening ad- 
dress telegrams were read from ex- 
Attorney Gen. Geo. H. Wickersham, 
Fred Lowenthal, former White Rats 
attorney in Chicago, and Milton Sills. 
Mr. Wickersham's message contained 
good wishes for the Four A's in their 
fight against the managers, Milton 
Sills' wire stated that certain reports 
spread alleging that the picture actors 
of California were against the Actors' 
Equity were untrue, and Bowenthal's 
telegram contained the announcement 
that the A. E. A. would hold a meeting 
at Hotel Morrison, Chicago, Sunday 
night. 

Mr. Wilson sailed into the managers 
from the start. The chief bone of 
contention between the actors and 
managers, according- to Wilson, is 
the question of managers paying for 
Sunday shows. Mr. \yilson also spoke 
of the P. M. A.'s refusal to arbitrate 
existing differences, but did not go 
deeply into the matter of contracts. 
'The managers are scared and they 
have resolved at all hazards to disrupt 
the Actors' organization," Mr. Wilson 
said, following a word of praise for 
the four A. E. A's who had obeyed 
orders and walked out of "Chu Chin 
Chow" when U. M. P. A-A E. A. stand- 
ard contracts were not forthcoming 
from Comstock & Gest. Mention of 
the Shuberts and Morris Gest brought 
groans and hisses. 

Hugh Frayne, New York State or- 
ganizer of the American Federation of 
Labor, in a red hot speech pledged the 
support of the A. F. of L. in the event 
of trouble with the managers, adding 
that if the actors called a strike mem- 
bers of the A. F. of L. could be de- 
pended upon not to patronize the the- 
atres. Toward the finish of his speech 
Frayne tempered his remarks, declar- 
ing that he hoped every means would 
be tried to secure the sought for ar- 
bitration, in order that a strike might 
be averted. Mr. Frayne, like Mr. Gill- 
more, Grant Stuart and all of the 
speakers, closed his remarks with a 
plea for loyalty. 

Fitzpatrick's talk was mainly a tirade 
against the vaudeville interests, dur- 
ing the course of which he told the 
members of the A E. A. that in the 
event of a strike they would have to 
prepare themselves to deal with gun- 
men, thugs, etc., whom Fitzpatrick in- 
sinuated would be speedily brought in- 
to the conflict by the P. M. A. Fitz- 
patrick seemed to take it for granted in 
his remarks that a strike of the A. E. 
A.'s was but a matter of days. 

The actors must also beware of press 
propaganda, Fitzpatrick said, as he was 
'sure the managers intended to do 
everything in their power to weaken 
the organization. The speaker was in- 
terrupted several times during his 
speech by cheers, receiving an ovation 
at the finish. 

Frank Gillmore, Executive Secretary 
of the A. E. A., in commenting on the 
report that 60 members of the Actors' 
Equity had recently resigned, offered 



to make an affidavit that only IS res- 
ignations had been received by . the 
A. E. A. in July and 12 in May and 
June. Six of the July resignations were 
from members of "Chu Chin Chow" 
cast 

Harry Mountford, preceding Bruce 
McRae, the final speaker^stepped for- 
ward with a confident grin when in- 
troduced and proceeded to enlighten 
the audience with a history of the 
drama from its earliest beginnings. The 
recital turned out to be a parable, in 
which the modern manager was char- 
acterized as a person who wanted to 
grab all of the box-office receipts and . 
leave the actor little or nothing. Af- , 
ter 15 fninutes of the highbrow stuff 
Mountford warmed up to his subject 
and the rest of his remarks' were prac- 
tically a repetition of the sentiments 
expressed by Fitzpatrick. 

Seated on the platform were' Francis 
Wilson, Frank Mills, Jim Marco (White 
Rats), John Cope, Grant Stuart, Jef- ., 
ferson De Angelis, Chas. Stevenson, 
Bruce McRae, Frank Gillmore, Edwin 
Mordant, Wm. Fitzpatrick and repre- 
sentatives of the Hebrew Actors, 
Chorus Union, etc. 

The Producing Managers' Associa- 
tion appointed an Emergency Commit- • 
tee at the meeting held at the Hotel 
Astor last Thursday afternoon, the 
duties of which will be to devise ways 
and means of coping with the P. M. A 
-A. E. A. situation. The committee 
consists of Wm. A Brady, Lee Shubert, 
John Golden, Henry W. Savage, Mor- 
ris Gest, Geo. M. Cohan, Marc Klaw, 
Arthur Hopkins and Arthur Hammer- 
stein. The Emergency Committee will 
meet dalv. 

Followng the meeting Sam H. Har- . 
ris, president of the P. M. A., an- 
nounced that Chas. Dillingham, Flor- 
enz Ziegfeld, Jr., Abraham Levy, Geo. 
Tyler, Lyle D. Andrews, E. L Mc- 
Gregor and Harrison Grey Fiske had 
joined the Producing Managers' Asso- 
ciation during the week. Mr. and Mrs. 
Chas. D. Coburn, members of the P. 
M. A., announced their resignation 
from the Actors' Equity Association. 

A resolution was unanimously adopt- 
ed by the P. M. A endorsing the stand 
taken by Comstock & Gest in refusing 
to accede to the contract demands of 
the A. E. A. in the "Chu Chin Chow" 
strike fizzle last week. 



Chicago, Aug. 6. 

The newspapers were given to . 
understand this was to be an epochal 
meeting which was. to decide once and 
for all the great problems existing be- 
tween the actor and the manager. 

Talent was to be imported from New 
York, handbills which flooded the loop 
gave out, and Harry Mountford and 
Francis Wilson were the featured head- 
liners Sunday night 

Neither one showed up. 

About 200 men and women of the 
legitimate stage appeared at the Mor- 
rison Hotel. Among them were Charles 
Cherry, Mercedes, Francine Larrimore, 
Tom Wise, Freddie Bachman, William 
Courtenay, Grant Mitchell, Al Bruce, 
Claude Wade, Harry Stanley. 

In the absence of Mounteford and 
Wilson, thfl Fitzpatricks— John of the 
Chicago Federation of Labor and 
James W. of the A. A A A—did the' • 
honors and most of the palaver. 
John, less acquainted than Jim with 
the issuf s under discussion, went 
big. Both Fitzpatricks launched a bit- 
ter psalm of hate against the mana- 
gers, Jim quoting Francis Villon (cor- 
rectly) and John quoting nobody. 
They confined their hymns largely to 
vilification of the gentlemen compelled 
to give employment to actors, John 
saying that every manager was despic- 
able, unregencrate, unscrupulous and 
the born enemy of the actor, and Jim 
backing this up in a more eloquent and 
polished manner. 

Dire happenings were hinted at by 
Jim, who hoped he. big blowoff would 
come in less thai three weeks. Jim. 



/. 



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* VAUBE VILLR 



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demed vehemently that either he or 
Mountford had anything to do with 
the A. E. JL Further he announced 
they would do nothing to help them in 

said" "C^to IS 7 ° Ur 0wa fight " be 

A murmur of disapproval greeted his 
statement that "David Belasco, Morris 
Gest, Jake and Lee Shubert are non- 
essentials of the theatre." 
A. a r *f«"*d.to a former member of 
the A. E. A, charged with having gone 
over to the manager's camp, as a yel- 
low traitor. Previously the same in- 
dividual had been referred to in a shn- 
' , A ar » n, A nne , r hy Edwin Mordant, of the 
* • . Coun «l, who acted as chair- 
man of the meeting, without the name 
being mentioned. 

A muttering had come up then. 
He nieans John Drew," a few actors 
whispered. 
^But apparently it was not John 

Tm i goirtfcr to give you this man's 
" ame ' J£g£ Fitzpatrick yelled It's 
Howard Kyle." 

Whereupon arose a hissing as of the 
old days of melodrama. 

Mr. Fitzpatrick referred also ,to a 
certain female—'! shall not call her a 
woman." he said-who had resigned 
from the A E. A. He referred to her 
expressed reasons-that since the affil- 
iation of the A, E. A, this woman 
didnt care to be associated with the 
actors organization. 

"That same reason didnt prevent 
this woman from scabbing five-a-day/ 
for Marcus Loew," said Jim. "She 
nasnt been heard of for a long time 
and doesn't deserve to be." 

This was Amelia Bingham, undoubt- 
edly, although Mr. Fitzpatrick had the 
grace not to mention the name. Here 
too there was a slight demonstration 
by some friends of this actress. 

Mr. Mordant and Jim Fitzpatrick 
both referred at length several time* 
to^the matter of the "Chu Chin Chow" 
rehearsals, which had resulted in the 
alleged discharge by Mr. Gest of one 
man and three women who had in- 
sisted on attending an A. E. A., meet- 
ing that was held at the same hour on 
the same day a rehearsal had been 
called. 

• Mr. Fitzpatrick said that the dis- 
charge of these people should be made 
£ i e3 2. tone of a strike, if one is 
called; that no strike, if called, could 
be settled unless these people were 
reinstated. 

Mordant, preceding the Fitzpatricks, 
sketched a history of the fight between 
!iA 4 J"- '' a " d . the m *nagers, de- 
clared the opposition of the managers 
was dire#ed largely against Francis - 
Wilson the head of the A. E. A, he 
spoke for Mountford and Fitzpatrick, 
referring to them_as.loyal and earnest 
workers for the cause; crucified by the 

^ ana £r r9 :. and V" 8 ^ *here had been 
an affiliation with, the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, despite newspaper 
reports to the contrary. 

He said the White Rats strike was 
not a failure, for it resulted in the adop- 
tion of the Actor's Equity contract. 

Umcernnng this contract, the matter 
came up as to what would become of 
"e j contracts in event of a strike. 

Jim Fitzpatrick allowed they should 
be thrown into a wastebasket until the 
strike was settled. 

■fi. V* i de S nse , °£ Mountford and 
Fitzpatrick, Mr. Mordant took especial 
pains to announce that Mountford 
wasnt handling the finances of the 
Associated Actors and Artists of 
America, in his post of international 
executive secretary. This was greeted 
with applause. 

Both Mordant and Jim Fitzpatrick 
warned the actors against joining the 
new organization of actors which they 
charged is fostered by the managers. 
Mordant said 160 members of the A, 
E. A, had resigned for the new or- 
ganization. But he quoted Frank Gil- 
more s statement, that in three months 
-May, June and July-there had been 



"30 resignations and over 300 new mem- 
bers. 

Grant Mitchell was asked to read a 
couple of resolutions of confidence in 
the executive council, adopted at the 
last meeting in Njew York. 

The meeting lasted from 11 :30 p. m., 
until nearly two o'clock a. m. 

;■: HOUSES OPENING. 

Palace, Manchester, Vt., Aug. 25. 

O. H., Bath., Me., Sept. 1. 

The Colonial, New York, will open 
September 1. The house is at present 
undergoing slight renovations. 

The Interstate Circuit houses in the 
Southwest will start opening at the 
end of next week, the first to start the 
season being Fort Worth and Dallas, 
which begin Aug. 17. Houston opens 
Aug. 24, San Antonio starts Aug. 31, 
and Little Rock Sept. 1. The New 
Empress, Tulsa, Okla., built for the 
W. V. M. A, will carry a five-act show 
booked from the Interstate, which, 
however, offers a seven-act bill. The 
Tulsa house will split with Muskogee, 
Okla. This will give the Interstate an 
extra week, the circuit now offering 
five and a half weeks. 

Shea's, Toronto, and Royal, Victoria, 
Can., Aug. 11. The latter is a new ad- 
dition to the Orpheum chain-. It plays 
Friday and Saturday of each week 
only, the same bill playing Calgary the 
four previous days. 

Temple, Rochester, and Palace, Chi- 
cago, Sept. 1. 
The Keystone and William Penn, 



NO WEEK END LOAFING. 

All artists* representatives ' doing 
business with the Keith Exchange must 
be represented on the booking floors 
Saturdays and Sundays hereafter as 
well as week days, according to a 
notice posted on the sixth floor bulletin 
board, Tuesday morning. * 

The notice is as follows : 

•While certain employes in this of- 
fice are excused from duty during the 
summer months, it does not excuse the 
men who have the responsibility of 
booking shows in the theatres, and 
therefore can not excuse representa- 
tives who have the privilege of doing 
business through this office from their 
duty in representing acts. All offices 
must be represented Saturdays and 
Sundays during the summer as well 
as the winter. 

/ . /. Murdoch." 

INCREASES FOR MUSICIANS. 

Denver, Aug. 6. 
Local vaudeville houses now must 
pay ?63 a week to the leader and $42 
a week for orchestra members. Pic- 
ture shows charging less than 25 cents 
admission roust pay $50 and $33. Those 
charging _more than 25 cents, $65 and 
g%f nd 5 r 2l cj a « legitimate theatres 
$4725 and $33.75. This represents an 
advance of from $5 to $15 a week for 
the musicians. 



Philadelphia, reopen Aug. 25. 

Keith's, Lowell, Mass., and Palace, 
Manchester, N. H., Aug. 25. 

Poli's, Wilkes-Barre, Pa., alternat- 
ing semi-weekly bills with Poll's Scran- 
ton, Pa, Sept. 1. 

SKETCH FOR ALEEN BRONSON. 

Aleen Bronson, formerly of Laurie 
and Bronson, is to appear in a playlet 
called "Come Thou Seven." The sketch 
calls for a Quakeress in the leading 
role, Which will be played by Miss 
Bronson. 

Joe Laurie is to enter jf Shubert pro- 
duction. 



Court Fines Sinclair Mation $25. 

Sinclair Masion, manager of the Els- 
mere Theatre, Bronx, N. Y, who re- 
cently assaulted Leo Jacobson, 15, with 
a billy" when the hoy refused to leave 
the lobby, was found guilty of disor- 
derly conduct by Magistrate Nolan, in 
the West Farms Court and fined $25. 




J. GORDON BOSTOCK 

Author— Director— Producer 
1483 Broadway, New York City 



.-.'/•••. 



_I.g— *j» 1m Plays, Musical Comedies. 
Sketches, Song, and Vaudeville Acts of alf 
■teas. . | . ■ 4| 

w ^lu?S , -I?Ri de * e, ' p *°ll ,e ^klng for a vaude- 

vat ev^ryttuSg! ^ 7 ^ """^ md *?> 

thlJ!!!8! t^Jb >tik 2?* ao, 5 °n the W« time 



I 




NEW ACTS. 

Three Killarney Girls, singing. . 

Mardo and Lorenz (man and woman). 

Raymond and Shram (two men), 
singing and piano. - 

Burns and Frabrito will have a new 
act next season, "His Only Client." 

Frank Conroy (Conroy and Lemaire- 
Conroy and Murphy), new comedy act. 

Harvey and Corinne (man and wom- 
an) (Harry Weber). 

Louise Gunning returning to vaude- 
ville, assisted by a male violinist. 

Ivanoff and Var Vara in a musical 
skit. 

Larry Clifford and Mike Kelly, two 
ex-burlesquers. 

"Miss Husband," two men, one wom- 
an (Arthur Lyons). 

Cooke Harvey Trio (two men, one 
woman), bicycle. 

Mile. Rialta and Co. (five people), 
electrical dancing. • . ' 

Francis and De Mar (man and wom- 
an), two-act 

Grank Goldie and Ada Ayres, two- 
act. 

Willard and Hamilton (two men) in 
Wi«lia C ms f oT er,y d ° ne by Wi,,afd Md 
«-j d, T Bre 12 an ('onnerly Elm City 4) 
two-act" " (fomerIy Texas 4), 

H. D. Zarrow, Chicago tab producer, 
will stage a aeries of girl acts next sea- 
son. (Ray Lea son.) 

Scanlon, Denos Bros and Scanlon 
(four men, formerly of the Six Stylish 
Meppers), singing and dancing. 

A new production with three sets 
featuring Frank Hale, Margaret Sev- 
enn, Peggy Carter, two female and 
pjj- 91 ?, 1 ? Ch.">e« singers, and the 
Eddie Edwards Jazz Band, formerly 

nft J « zz Band - ( Pat Ca8e y-) 

Mile. Rosins Zotti, prima donna, and 
Jacques Pintel, piano virtuoso, in an 
operatic and concert duo for vaude- 
ville. Mile. Zotti has just returned 
from a two years tour of Mexico and 
South America. Mr. Pintel has toured 
theprpheum Circuit as a "single." 

A new act featuring Frank Hale with 
the Misses Dixie O'Neill, Margaret 
Severin, Peggy Carter, Yoy Lin, Loys 
Ming and Eddie Cox, assisted by Ed- 
wards' Jazz Orchestra, has been pro- 
duced. It is titled "Bagdad to Broad- 
way' and carries three special sets. 
(Pat Casey.) 



HENDEISON'S LEASED. ' 

Henderson's, Coney Island, has been 
leased for 29 years to the United Cigar 
Stores Co. Possession passes Nov. 1, 
next, after which date, "Henderson's," 
a famous Coney Island landmark for 
years, including a restaurant and thea- 
tre in the building, will have passed 
away.' ■','••.;'..;.-■ 

One report around the 1 island this '"'■ 
week stated the Qgar Stores Co, in- 
tended to demolish the present build- 
ing and erect a large hotel on the site. 
The length of the lease discredited 
this report with the Islanders. 
With Prohibition Henderson's bust 
. ness in the restaurant, the most profit- 
able part of the .establishment, fell off 
in volume and profit. When the buti-' 
ness reached the gross of the former 
liquor days, the disparity in the profit 
without Hquor fell so low that it could 
not offset the lean days of a Coney 
Island week, generally all of the days 
excepting the week-end and holidays. 
Henderson's has made a fortune for 
its owners. Fred Henderson holds 50 
per cent., Mrs. S. Hoagland. 25 pet- 
cent., and a Mr. Norwood, the other 

■ . i per , cen ^ ** *" a Pot"" season 
when the combined theatre and res=- 
taurant did not net $100,000. making the' 
money in the summer months only. 
Henderson is interested in the Or-. 
oheum Circuit of vaudeville and makes " 
his headquarters in San Francisco, 
Since his depatteure from the East some 
years ago. Carlton Hoagland has been 
in charge of the Conev Island place; - 

Henderson's theatre plavs big time 
vaudeville, secured through the Keith 

a S* nc }\ J* competes' with the Brighton 
(Beach) Theatre that is booked from 
the same office. The Henderson Thea- 
tre in winter has nlaved pictures, but 
neycr W*e that policy much attention. 
The present Henderson building oc- 
cupies the same plot the original Heni . 
dersons started on: Thnt wm a wood- 
en building such as lined the Bowery of* 

lj2 8 F T $J n those 6a y $ \ The present ; 
brick building went up about 12 years 
ago. ■ '■•'.■•' 

Lait summer/ with a cabaret revue 
in the restaurant and the menu prices 
increased accordingly, Henderson's is •■.'* % 
said to have had its most profitable 
season....-- :" . , 



■:■-■*■*, 



B. F. KEITH TAKES 81ST STREET. 

♦u Th o e i $*&. Kt J^ interests acquired . 
the 81st Street Theatre this week and 
will assume the management of that " 
house on Sept. 1. A policy of vaude- / 
ville and Pictures along similar lines 
as nowwill be carried out. The 81st 
Street is a modern theatre on upper 
Broadway. Since opening several 
years ago it has been controlled by 
interests who built it. The latter were' 
unacquainted in theatricals. 



CROSS AND JOSEPHINE DIVORCED 

„. ... ■ -_ , Chicago, Aug. 6. 

Wellington (Duke) Cross secured a 
divorce here yesterday from Lois Jo- 
sephine alleging desertion. Service in 
the action was made by publication. 
Thomas J. Johnson represented Cross. 

MARRIAGES. 

a A ?£ P/^. f . ormer Stat « Senator 
Archibald McNeil, Jr., of Connecticut, 
m New York, August 2. 
Billy Reeves (Skipper, Kennedy and 

? e , e 7 e / s 2 in P&H& t0 C 088 * Trans- 
field (Transfield Sisters). 

John Cromwell at Union Hill, N. J., 
A A a *AJ° M » ri e Goff. Both are with 
"At 9.45" at the Pl ayhouse, New York. 

(ton m hot a wAm rowmn 



( :,.;•»;_■ >• . \ .■■■,:■.■..■; ;,s,;^ 

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VARIETY 



ACTS CONTEMPLATING PLAYING IN THE WEST 



; 



Get in Touch With 



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I*:'---"-! 1 ''. ' 
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(OF CHICAGO) 

You Any Open Time? Write, Wire or Phone 

SUITE 1211-1212- 

1213 MASONIC TEMPLE, CHICAGO, ILL. 



■■■■ . ■ ■ • 

: 






■ 

. - 



MY EXCLUSIVE EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE IS § 



RAY HODGDON 

Palace Theatre Building, New York City 



BOOKING EXCLUSIVELY WITH 

B. F. Keith Vaudeville Exchange 

Orpheum Circuit, Western 

Vaudeville Managers' Assn. 

and Affiliations 



Follies and LeRoy Booked Solid W. V. M. A., B. F. Keith Circuit (Western^ 









rAft-. ■-.•■■■ - -. • . 




i 



"■■■ 
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Vol LVI, No. 1 



PnbUmeil TTMktr *» L . 
Tlnwi Squn, New Tort M. 
to VhMj. IML Amnul 
tian. IS. Stnxl* oojto. U 



NEW YORK CsTY, AUGUST 29, 1919 



STRIKE FACTIONS DEADLOCKED 
AT END OF STRIFE'S THIRD WEEK 



Samuel Gompers' Assertion of Actors' Union Support Places 
| Managers Against Stone Wall. Managers Had Depended 
Upon Gompers; Court Proceedings and More (Closed 
Theatres Since Last Issue of Variety. 26 Attrac- 
tions Stopped in New York; 8 in Chicago. 
Actors' Fidelity League Organized, With 
Over 1,900'Member* in Short Time. 



fh; 



\ 



I'? 



-•' y 



Wednesday night, the end of the ' 
third week. of the strike of the Equity 
Actors' Association against the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association, saw the 
two factions Completely deadlocked. 

The full support of the American 
Federation of Labor, assured the A. 
E. A. Tuesday, afternoon at .the Lex- 
ington Theatre by Samuel , Gompers, 
placed the managers squarely before a 
stone wall, as far 'as any adjustment of 
the strike with the A. E. A. could be 
made by them, in view of the man- 
agers', repeated assertions that they 
would not countenance a compromise 
of any kind with the actors that called 
for the least recognition of the A. E. A. 
^-Tt was then (Wednesday) expected 
the_ managers would attempt to open 
their theatres with non-union players, 
stage hands and musicians, thereby in- 
viting a country wide struggle with 
the A. F. of L. 

Court proceedings and more closed 
theatres marked the week since the 
last, issue of Vahibtt (weekly). Pro- 
ceedings legally have been heard in 
New York and Chicago. The hearing 
in: New York was on Monday before. 
Justice Hendrich in the Supreme Court 
when an oral opinion was rendered 
very favorable to the managers. An 
agreed upon order between counsel 
was entered Wednesday. It prevented 
picketing and the A. E. A. from in- 
terfering with contracted actors or 
theatres. - The injunction is a tempor- 
ary one. 

In Chicago the injunction proceed- 
ings started there came to New York 
Wednesday for the Master before 
whom they have been heard to obtain 
the testimony of. managers in this city. 

Up to Wednesday there had been 26 
attractions stopped in , New York. 
Twenty were prevented from continu- 
ing through walk outs of actors or 
stage hands and musicians. Six could 
not. open as announced through the 
strike. In Chicago eight attractions 



were out, with no $2 house open Wed- 
nesday night. The strike situation in 
tabulated form will be found in any 
of the Variety Bulletins,, published 
daily, which are reprinted in this issue 
of weekly Vambtt. # ■' 

During the week the Actors' Fidelity 
League came to life. It claimed 1.900 
members- up to Tuesday night. The 
presidency of the A. F. L. was voted 
George M. Cohan by acclamation. Mr. 
Cohan replied be would accept it and 
come before the League as an actor 
only, wben his resignation as a mem- 
ber of the managers' association had 
been acted upon. , The A. F. L. is ad- 
mittedly an affiliation of the managers' 
association. It refused a tender of 
$100,000 from Mr. Cohan for financial 
support in the belief it could be main- 
tained by membership dues. The 
League held nightly meetings at the 
Hotel Biltmore following its birth. 
These meetings were presided over by 
Louis Mann who promoted the organ- 
ization. It appears to succeed the so- 
ciety of independent actors E. H. 
Sothern unsuccessfully sponsored. 

The prolonged struggle has com- 
menced to weary the managers, actors 
and others interested in it. In Wed- 
nesday's Bulletin is a proposal made 
by Tom Wise through Walter Jones 
in Chicago tbat the strike be ended 
by a "gentleman's agreement." Messrs. 
Jones and Wise are members of the 
A. E. A. Council. 

The detail of the strike day by day 
will be found in the Bulletins. 



CHICAGO TICKET DEAL -. 

Chicago, Aug. 27. 

Despite the death struggle of theat- . 
ricals, a record deal is reported put 
over this week between the Klaw & 
Erlanger theatres and Mrs. Florence 
Couthoi, "queen of th« ticket scalpers," 
for seats to the Blacks tone, Powers, 
Colonial and Illinois theatres. 

After weeks of • negotiation* this 
string contracted with Mrs. Couthoi, it 
is said, to give her the absolute option 
through the season on all seats up to 
and including the, tenth row on _ the 
main floors for any and all attractions. 
This means, that she, .need not .take 
more than she wants at any time, but 
can take all stipulated whenever she 
wants. She cannot . return what she 
has already taken. 

. The deal places all other scalpers at 
Mrs. Couthoi's mercy for. these houses, 
and they have to. get. their tickets 
through her. . 

Smaller, deals of similar nature have 
been consummated by Mrs. Couthoi 
With Corhstock & Gest at the La Salle 
and A. H.' Woods at the\ Woods. ..At 
the latter she has only three rows 
instead of ■ ten. :." ■' '.'. ', V ".. . 

K. .& : E. houses followed the." pre-, 
cedent of the Shuberts in their trans- 
action. The Shuberts have had the 
same deal, according to report, with 
Mrs. Couthoi for two years. . . 



Entered as second class matter Pisititisr 
23, 1906, at the Port Offtct at New Tort, 
N? Thunder the Art of Matso 9, UTtY 



NAME POST FOR DREW. 

The men of the theatrical, newspa^; 
pers, publicity, pictures and allied fit- -'- 
terest s, who served in either the army, the* 
navy or marines, have formed arnpdsrHfo' 
of the American Legion, named in :■:: 
honor of S. Ranken Drew, son of the <; 
late Sidney Drew, Who was a lieutenant .,. 
of aviation and was the first American ;.£ 
actor killed in the war. 

The last meeting of the post waft 
held noon Wednesday at Keen's. The .■■■.. 
temporary officers are Post Command- -j v 
'er, Lieut. Commander Wells Hawks,/ 1 •* 
U. S. N. R. F.; Vice Post Commander, > 
W. H. Roddy; Post Adjutant, Ralph 
Navarro ; Finance Officer, L. ' ». }) 
O'Shaughnessy; Historian, W. G. News- 
man. .: ' ■■'■■:'•■■■'•', 

On the membership committee' are J.; 



* 



MOONLIGHT JAZZ BATHING. 

Paris, Aug. 27. 
The latest innovation of smart cos- 
mopolitan society at Deauville and 
Trouville is jazzing on the sand in 
bathing costumes. Parties were seen 
the other night sporting in the sea, 
accompanied by the strains of a private 
jazz band. Miss Denise Crowley, with 
Cyril Crowley and his wife, are hon- 
ored', with the idea of .the moonlight 
dance on the seashore. 
* "It's so funny to be fox-trotting 
when a big wave comes and bowls 
you over," admitted Denise to a news- 
paper man on the spot. 



J. Klopstein, J.'H. Adkins, Howard 
Greenland A. P. Waxman. 

AOT 

•. Ff bin reports about this week vaude- 
ville acts have not displayed any mad 
desire to accept immediate engage- 
ments.. Several voiced the opinion the 
actors' strike that brought in the, stage 

" hands and musicians might be extend- 
ed to vaudeville by the stage hands 
and they did not .care to be thus in? 

' volved. 

(A statement _in the Variety Daily 
Bulletin of Aug. 23 made by Charles C. 
Shay (stage hands) made the attitude 
of his union in the matter of all the-; 
atricals quite plain. Mr. Shay said 
vaudeville would not be bothered if 
not interfering in the legit strike;) ;-, 

- - - it 

SNEAKING OUT SOME SHOWS. 

■ There are a few shows on tour under 
the management of a couple of the 
members of the Producing' Managers' 
Association. 

Just where they are playing and the 
names of the attractions are being held 
in the dark. Players and crtws are 
evidently satisfied to go along lie far 
as they can until such time as there 
is interference from the labor bodies./- 



\ 9 A 



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CIROS, DE FRECE'S AND EXCLUSIVE 

London, Aug. 27. 

Walter De Frece has acquired Ciro's, 
London most exclusive Bohemian club, 
which he will shortly reopen. 

The general public will not be wel- 
comed. 

■ ■» — — — 

COSTUMES— GOWNS— DRESSES 
D'ALE&SIQ. 44 W«rt Mtt it. U. Y. 0.. adj. llAIKl 



Read the Bulletins 

Readers of Variety are requested to look over the reproductions of 
Variety Daily Bulletin! in this issue. They are of dates, Aug. 21, 22, 23, 25, 
26 and 27. 

Many of the items in the Bulletins are of such • character that they 
ordinarily would be found in the general news columns of the weekly Uiue 
of Variety. They have not, however, been repented. Those who sre not 
interested in the technical news of the progress of the strike, such as the) 
Bulletins mostly carry, may quickly detect the general news item* in tham 
by their heads. . , 

The reproduction of the Bulletins is for the information of the profsi- 
sional readers outside New York City. 

The Bulletins in this issue are on P»f*« 17 to 40. ', 



■: 1 -y- 



' ,.V • 



«.-■ ■ ••.■• •■■ .'■ I •' ■ : .: •!••:" ' 






' ' "it 



CABLES 









LONDON SEASON BEGINS LONG 
BEFORE BANK HOLIDAY NOW 



General Review of Season Just Finished Shows Strangely 

j Varied List of Failures and Successes. Good Autumn 

Looked For by Wise West Enders. Shows 

That Are Closing. New Ones to 

Come. 



■r'-y 



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• .■ •■ 



g& 



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j London, Aug. 4. 

Time was when August Bank Holi- 
day meant the restarting of the British 
theatrical machine, for on that day 
.most of the provincial tours started 
f*;' and the big houses, swept, garnered, 
: ■■ • newly painted, reopened either with 
new shows or with the continuation 
of a successful run. But all that seems' 
over now, and for once we cannot 
blame the "War" for long before that 
fateful August Bank Holiday in 1914, 
the seasons were changing— they ran 
into each other and the«old theory that 
the summer-time spelt disaster for all 
v but the "busher" and the Pierrot troupe 
had been ruthlessly exploded. 
The last six or nine months have 
' been strange ones. ' The small man- 
ager with his blatantly patriotic "war 
drama," re-clad his puppets, re-titled 
his shows and having altered a line 
here and there, made the exciting 
periods of his attraction fit in with 
the times, the love-child, the unmar- 
ried mother, the position of the British 
girl married to an alien enemy (said 
er emy being always the villain) took 
the place of "khaki." Naval shows 
made their appearance on the boards 
of West End houses, and one or two' 
. of them remained. 

"Tlte Freedom of the Seas/' not a 
.very sensational success however, "In 
•> -the Night Watches," a remarkably 
powerful French Naval play with a 
touch of the "problem" about it, fol- 
lowed "The Better *01e" at the Oxford. 
"The Luck of the Navy" produced a 

irear ago at the Queen's and which 
s still going strong at the New. 

Among the greatest failures was 
"Jolly Jack Tar," which failed to at- 
V tract anybody after the first night at 
"■ Prince's. Spy plays tried hard to get 
,a-footing. ''The Female Hun," at the 
•Lyceum, Melville drama in Irving's old 
home, is unlike anything else under 
the sun. The Bros. Melville take lib- 
erties which would mean the lethal 
chamber for any other West End 
manager, but "House Full" boards are 
ever the rule whenever one of their 
"thrillers" holds the stage. "The Hid- 
den Hand " boosted by politicians and 
helped by film and story, struggled 
umensationally at the Strand, and 
there were others, some good, some 
bad, but the production of "The Black 
Feather" at the Scala sounded the 
death knell, for a time at least, of 
the "spy drama" with all its improba- 
bilities and ultra-patriotic cant. 

Locking ahead, the autumn shows 
ery prospect of prosperity, and un- 
less we have a real good social up- 
heaval of some sort, all will be well. 
Even if the worst does happen, it is 
extremely doubtful whether it will 
affect the theatres or entertainment 
world very badly. London is London, 
and in the provinces business is never 
better than during a strike and with 
the trouble generally patched up be- 
fore the pinch is felt acutely. 

"The Boy" finishes at the Adelphi, 
Aug. 9, having, by then, registered a 
nice little run of 800 performances. 
"Going Up," at the Gaiety, comes off 
Aug. 16, and will be followed by "The 
Telephone Box." "The Maid of the 
Mountains" will continue to break rec- 
ords at Daly's (and also in the prov- 
inces). "Chu Chin Chow," that re- 
markable Arabian Nights entertain- 



■ ■„ 

I A.. 






<*fe 



■-". '■ 



Abil 

m 



. .■ 



ment with hVs daringly dressed or un- 
dressed "crowd", will go on, apparently 
indefinitely, playing to capacity at His 
Majesty's, and Oscar Asche' is the mov- 
ing spirit in the production of "East- 
ward Hoi" at the Alhambra, and even 
a revival^ of "Kismet," the parent of 
the Arabian Nights shows, is rumored. 
"Uncle Sam," having beaten the critics, 
continues to woo prosperity and ladle 
out propaganda at the Haymarket; our 
friends Potash & Perlmutter (as por- 
trayed by Yorke and Leonard) will 
still dabble profitably in the "movie" 
business with "Business before Pleas- 
ure" at the Prince's. 

"Eyes of Youth" enters into its last 
week to-day at St. James's. Later on, 
Lady Forbes-Robertson will re-appear 
in a new play, but at another theatre. 
Robert Lorraine will continue with 
"Cyrano de Bergerac," a performance 
which has been a blessing -to bur- 
lesquers, and which originated the 
trouble between C. B. Cochran and 
the Actors' Association. He will, how- 
ever, very shortly have to Have the 
Duke of York's and find another home. 
At the Winter Garden, once beloved 
as the "Old Mo," and later as the 
Middlesex Music Hall, "Kissing Time" 
goes merrily. "A Temporary Gentle- 
man" gibes without offense at the 
man who rose from the ranks and 
delights crowded houses at the Oxford. 
"His Little Widows" prosper at the 
Garrick. Delysia appears as "Cleo- 
patra," at the Pavilion, in "As You 
Were"; "Trimmed in Scarlet" occu- 
pies the Globe, but is milder than the 
title suggests. 

'Tilly of Bloomsbury" at the Apollo, 
"Three Wise Fools" at the Comedy, 
"Our Mr. Hepplethwate" at the Cri- 
terion, the Lyceum with a series of 
light opera revivals by the Carl Ross 
Company. At the conclusion of this 
season the company will migrate to 
. Prince's. Opera will hold the boards 
of Drury Lane until the. time comes 
for the autumn spectacular drama, 
"The Lost Leader. A peculiar po- 
litical phantasy has caught on at the 
Court, and 'The Cinderella Man" pro- 
vides food for the Owen Nares wor- 
shippers at the Queen's. That peculiar 
hygienic production now described as 
a farce, "The Very Idea," satisfies audi- 
ences at St. Martins, and the con- 
troversy its arrival- caused is worth 
much money paid on the boardings. 
Revue is losing much of its popu- 
- larity, although it is still used tb 
camouflage indifferent music-halt pro- 
grams and no one will be particularly 
broken-hearted when the day comes 
for its final obsequies. Revue has long 
been an excuse for the production of 
mediocre plotless musical comedy, and 
very few of them have lived long 
enough to become generally known. 
Exceptions of course are "As You 
Were" with Delysia. at the Pavilibn, 
"Buzz-Buzz" at the Vaudeville, and 
"Laughing Eyes" at the Strand. Revue 
is still the outstanding feature of the 
Hippodrome program where "Joy 
Bells" plays to "early door" capacity, 
but the Palace, originally built for 
opera, has come into its own with 
"Monsieur Beaucaire." 

Two of the most remarkable things 
about the last month's theatrical his-' 
tory have been the- wonderful success 
.,» . _ „ (Continued on page 8.) 



CHARLOT COMING OVER. 

• -'"'. ' ' .' ' London, Aug. 27. 

It is reported here Andre Chariot 
is on the water, bound for New York. 
On the same boat are Jack Buchanan 
and Phyllis Monkman, who will be 
placed by him in an American revue, 
through an arrangement made, it is 
said, with Charles B. Maddock, prior 
to their sailing, ■ 

Mr. Chariot is a stage producer of 
prominence over here. He was on 
your side about eight months ago. 

CAFE CONCERT TRIES OPERA. 

. ■ ■ •■ - Paris, Aug. 27. 

A. Bernard, owner of the Casino de 
Montmartre, will give a season of 
classical operetta at this little cafe 
chantant, commencing this week, for 
which purpose the hall will be re- 
' christened the Nouveau Lyrique. 

STAGGERING FIGURE TO COCHRAN. 
v London, Aug. 27. 
Charles B. Cochran recently cables 
Maurice and Ida Adams asking what 
salary they wanted to dance in a show 
and also a restaurant. 

Their reply said they would con- 
sider $2,500 weekly. An answer, was 
sent back signed by his secretary to 
the effect Cochran had passed away 
. suddenly. 

IDEAL BUYS NEPTUNE. 

, . London, Aug. 27. 

The Ideal Co. has bought the Nep- 
tune Film Co.'s studios at Elstre. 

Ruff ells is retiring from Ideal, the 
business having been purchased by the . 
general manager, Newman. . 

Vitagraph had been in the market 
for the concern. 



COMEDIE FRANCAISE IN BELGIUM 
Paris, Aug. 27. 
The Theatre du Pare, Brussels, is to 
have the privilege of the performances 
of the famous French troupe, which 
will appear periodically in the Belgian 
capital. The Galerie Saint-Hubert 
theatres formerly received the official 
visits of the Comedie Francaise. 



STOLL'S KENSINGTON. 

London, Aug. 27. 

Sir Oswald Stoll . has secured a new 
music hall site in Kensington. 

This addition to the Stoll string will 
not be built until next yean 

Frank Wirth Returning.. 

London, Aug. 27. 

Frank Wirth, of the' famous cirtus 
family, is now en route for America 
by way of Marseilles, and was due to 
sail from that port on the Roma Aug. 
19. 

Before leaving London Wirth ar- 
ranged for 30 weeks booking here in 
the halls for his daughter, opening for 
three weeks at the Coliseum at Christ- 
mas. 



L$ ' 











Garden of Allah for Drury Lane. 

London, Aug. 27. 
- Negotiations are being actively con- 
ducted for the production at Drury 
Lane after the regular pantomime sea- 
son of Hichen's "The Garden of Allah." 
The piece was never done in London. 
Ah offer has been made to Robert 
Loraine to play the leading male role. 

Ballet Doe» Open at Empire. 
London, Aug. 27. 
(Variety's cable of several weeks ago 
stating the Russian Ballet would open 
ft the Empire Sept. 15 was indignantly 
denied at the time. 

Sir Alfred Butt announced Sunday 
"The Lilac Domino" will close Sept. 
13 and the ballet open Sept. IS. 

Errol Producing at Gaiety. 

London, Aug. 27. 
A deal is on which will keep Leon 
Errol in London indefinitely. This de- 
pends, however, upon arrangements 
tor him to produce future Gaiety pro- 
ductions. .„_:'.,,,.. »-~j 



/ V 



IN PARIS. 

By E. G. Kendrew. 

".-'. Paris,' Aug. 14. 
The First Division Circus of the A. 

E. F. was in Cologne early in August, 
and played on the Amsterdamerstrasse 
football lot. It .is a most creditable 
entertainment, and manager Captain 

F. C. Rans expects to visit Bonn, 
Duren and other spots of the allies' 
occupation. It contains about twenty 
acts, besides a real Barnum's side show 

-.of -freaks. .-•;•:. 

•The Land ,We LoveC was the title 
voted by the doughboys at the club- 
house of the Knights of Columbus, 27 I 
Boulevard Malesherbes, Paris, for the 
official films made by the Department 
of the Interior in Washington to il- 
lustrate the Elizabeth Marbury lec- 
tures on Back-to-the-Land. Some in 
the: public suggested "Everybody's 
Land/' while about 10 per cent favored 
"A Home for Each." .The title there- 
fore has been chosen by the soldiers 
in France themselves, and not by the 
officials at Washington. 

* PARIS THEATRES.-Carmoame and 
repertoire (Odeon), repertoire at 
Opera, Comique, Comedie Francaise. 
Mariec du Regiment (Ambigu), Ma- 
nage Parisien (Varietes); Chichi 
(Theatres de Paris); La Presidents 
(Gymnase); Choquette ct son As 
(Renaissance); Chambre a Part (An- 
toine); Phi-Phi (Bouftes); Ecole des 
Satyres (Edouard VII); Bonheur de 
ma Femme (Gymnast); La Madelon 
(Dejazet); Verdun (Arts); Sept Bai- 
sers Capitaux (Imperial) ; le Systeme 
du Dr. Goudron, &c. (Grand Guignol) ; 
Demi, Vierges (Porte St.-Martin); 
Mariage a la Casbah (Mayol); Niche 
d'Amour (Bouffes du Nord); Revues 
at Casino de Paris, Folies Bergere, 
Olympia, Ambassadeurs, Cigale, Varie- 
ties at Alhambra, Nouveau Cirque, 
Alcazar, Marivaux. 



HARWOOD LEASES AMBASSADORS. 

London. Aug. 27. 

H. M. Harwood, dramatist, who is 
also a shareholder in the Royalty The- 
atre, has bought the lease of the Am- 
bassadors for £10,000, taking possession 
at the conclusion of the three months' 
teim held by Lee White and Clay 
Smith, who are paying £250 per week 
for their twelve weeks* renewal. 

The previous rental was £237. 



• 



"LOVE MARKET' RISQUE. 

Paris, Aug. 27. 
The new operetta produced Aug. 23 
and called "The Love Market," is re- 
ported as quite risque, . 
' Leo Pou vet's music is ordinary. 

A fair run i« anticipated for the 
piece. ':". ■ ■'.■' 

BRITISH RAW FILM SHORT. 

London, Aug. 27. • 
British film production is now se- 
verely hampered through the lack of 
negative film stock. The reason for 
the shortage is a reported strike of 
American dock workers. The Eastman 
company is doing its best in an effort 
to cope with the shortage, their spe- • 
cial plant at Harrow working to full 
capacity. 

-WILL WIDOW" AT LYCEUM. 

London, Aug. 27. 
The Lyceum is due for a new attrac- 
tion about mid-September. The show 
is called "The Will Widow," the work 
of Arthur Shirley. 

AT THE ALHAMBRA. 

Paris, Aug 27. 

Arturo Bernardi, Nathano Brother' 
Will Bland Co., and Three DetW 
open at the Alhambra Aug. 29. 

The Three Merrills and Three Jr .-. 
Builders remain there for another t; ' 
weeks. 

Leon Rogee ends his engagement: - 
the Alhambra tomorrow. ;£$& 









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VAUDEVILLE 



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LOEW BUYS 45th STREET CORNER 
FOR OFFICE BLDG. AND THEATRE 






.-■-. 






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v Pay* $2,200,000 For Site. 23-Story Office Building Going Up, 
With Theatre Seating 3,000. Title Passing in 30 
Days. 120 Feet Frontage on Broadway. 
Claimed To Be World's Best 

Comer. 



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Marcus Lbew has purchased, for $2,- 
200,000 the northeast corner of Broad- 
way arid 45th street, claimed by/many 
to be the busiest corner in the world, 
although statistically four great cor- 
ners rank it • 

Mr. Loew intends erecting a 23- 
story office building on the. site, with a 
theatre in the interior seating 3,000. 
Thos. W. Lamb is now drawing the 
plans. Title will pass in 30 days, when 
all tenants will receive 90 days' notice 
to vacate. The notice to vacate is a 
condition, >of the leases. 

The plot has 120 feet frontage on 
Broadway, starting at the corner; 151 
feet on 45th street and 122 feet on 
46th street. Old' buildings how occupy 
the ground. ; .-•.-.•'* •'• 

.The plot known as the Hibben prop- 
erty, has been negotiated for by sev- 
eral parties since the recent death of 
(he owner. Some years ago the high- 
est offer made was $1,750,000, with $2,- 
250,000 then asked. The property in- 
creased in value with the advancement 
of Times square. Thos. B. Hibben was 
"said to have paid originally $600,000 
for it, afterwards securing a first mort- 
gage for $i,ooo;ooo. 

varibtt has been a tenant, just above 
the street floor, for about 12 years. 
The oldest tenant is the Bartholdi 
Hotel, a theatrical landmark of the 
square. : . . 'i 

•;.-." The 45th street corner is the con- 
verging point of Broadway and Sev- 
enth avenue'. Three street car lines 
pass the corner, Broadway, Seventh 
avenue and Broadway and 42nd street 
Diagonally opposite is the Hotel As-, 
tor, immediately opposite' is the New 
York Theatre building, and Across the 
street is the Astor Theatre. 






became known they were married at 
St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, 
Aug. 16. 

The bride is Lucille Cavanagh re- 
cently in vaudeville. She may return 
to the stage around January. ■ 

Mr. Leimert is a real estate agent, 
about 50 years of age, and had been 
accepted as a confirmed bachelor. He 
first met his wife when the Cavanagh 
vaudeville act appeared at the local 
Orpheum in May. Following her to 
New York, Leimert waited until the 
turn closed its season, with the. mar- 
riage following. . i 

RUSH IN BOOKINGS. 

With nearly all of vaudeville open- 
ing next week for the regular season, 
there was a rush of big time bookings 
this week. 

Many acts received routes for the 
season. The return of Eddie Darling 
last week hastened the booking which 
had been held back by his absence 
abroad. The Keith, New York, houses 
will all be open Monday, next. 



BOMB SENT TO ARTIST. 

Chicago, Aug. 27. 

The Post' Office Department has un- 
covered a deadly bomb sent through 
the mails seven months ago addressed 
to Paul Petching, of the Musical Gar- 
dens act, in care of the Beehler & 
Jacobs Agency. The package was held 
by the agency for months and then 
returned to the dead letter office. No 
return address was on the package 
and Petching could riot be located. 

The Government authorities on open- 
ing the package discovered it contained 
an alarm clock mechanism, a three- 
inch tube of dynamite, a small box of 
white powder and two bottles of acid. 
It was evidently not a plot against 
Petching, for the bomb could not be 
set off without a small wire attach- 
ment to the clock. Instructions: how 
to complete the bomb and to set it for 
explosion were contained in the pack- 
age. 

Petching is a German citizen and 
has not been seen or heard of since 
November last. 



A. E. F. PLAYING RECORD. 

The return of Vardon and Perry from 
the other side brings a claim by the 
boys that they hold the playing record 
of the A. E. F. They were over there 
for 10 months, playing 397 shows in 
208 days. 



DEMPSEY OPENING LIGHT. 
The Jack Dcmpsey show opened to 
very light business at the Opera House 
in Detroit Monday.' "v T - " 



Henry Clive la Now O'H.rr*. 

Paris, Aug. 27. 
Sid Chaplin has arrived here with 
O'Harra, formerly known as Henry 
Olive. 



Chevalier in Caiino Revue. 

Paris, Aug. 27. 
Maurice Chevalier has opened in the 
revue at the Casino. He is doing An- 
glo-American business successfully. 



SAILINGS. 

London Aug. 27. 
* Sailing from here via the Canadian 
Pacific Line for Montreal on the Si- 
cilian Aug, 22 are Stella Hoban, Her- 
bert Ward (and wife), of the H. Robert 
Law Studios. t \ 

Florence Walton with a. Jan Band. 

A jazz band will aid Florence Walton 
on the vaudeville stage when she deb- 
uts alone under the direction of M. S. 
Bentham. 

It formerly was Maurice and Walton, 
a "society", dancing team for several 
years. 



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VAUDEVILLE PRICES UP. 

Beginning Labor Day cut rate vaude 
ville will be a thing of the past 
so far as the Royal and Alhambra, two 
of the Keith houses, . are concerned. 

The Royal will go back to $1 top 
for evenings and Saturday and Holiday 
matinees and the Alhambra to $1.50. 

This scale hasn't been in vogue since 
the days, of Percy Williams and is re- 
garded as the forerunner of a general 
tilt in prices all along the vaudeville 
line. • 

Managers ' explain the necessity of 
the new policy by pointing out the 
excessive tax levied on amusements 
and the increased cost of labor and 
other items of operation. 



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"CHECKING UP" AT CAMPBELL'S. 

A vaudeville agent, somewhat no- 
torious for a long list of acts and few 
bookings, was. showing the list to a 
booking man the other morning. 

As the booker ran over the list, an- 
other agent standing by often remark- 
ed, "Dead." 

After the soliciting agent had called 
off the names of four or five artists 
who had died and heard the word re- 
peated each time,, he observed : 
• "Guess my office is growing careless. 
I'll have to check up this list at 
Campbell's." f 



LUCILLE CAVANAGH MARRIED. 

San Francisco, Aug. 27. 
It was not until the arrival here of 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Leimert that it 




BAND TRAVELING IN STYLE. M 

' San Francisco, Aug. -27.; -;'. 

Arthur Hickman, writer of several 
song hits, and assistant manager of the 
St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco, and 
musical director of the St. Francis 
Orchestra, left Frisco Aug. 26 for |ifev* 
York City, accompanied by his> ; . 'or? 
chestra. Hickman and his orchestra 
are; going to. New York for the pur- 
pose of making records for the, Co- 
lumbia Phonograph Co. ' ■■ "'''>*-\ 

A special Pullman, with their A 
piano installed, was furnished 1 - ! ^>^ 
by the . company, which is paying 
the expenses for the trip. That V 
amount to about $2,600. According 
report the orchestra is to receive $15,' 
000 for the record making. 

Arrangements have been made fot 
the orchestra to appear in the Cas- 
cades room on the Biltmore roof; be- 
ginning Sept. 1 for two weeks, where 
they will be billed as "Hickman's Ho- 
tel St. Francis Orchestra, San Fran- 
cisco." 

The personnel of the orchestra U 
Ben Black, bahjoist and profession.! 

Sanager for Sherman Clay. & Co. 
eve Douglass, Frank Ellis, . Balk 
Spiller, Vic King, Clyde Dofep Burl 
Ralton, Fred Kaufman and \ ,iltci 
Rosener. Art Hickman, director.VL^!, 
A 50-piece band furnished by thi 
Musicians' Union escorted the boys tc 
the train and pictures were taken ol 
their departure . -y 

&soo for appearing; Stl 

$2,500 is the salary Harry Houdini ii 
receiving this week for making per 
sonal appearances with- his latest Fam 
bus Players-Lasky feature film! at tin 
Broadway Theatre. Mr, Houdini ft 
the star of the picture.. The amour. 
is reported to be Houdini's weekly 1 sal 
arv in pictures, besides which he se 
cutis an interest in the production 
When called upon to give his physics 
Self to the Broadway's stage durin| 
the week's run of the feature, Houdin 
asked the producers to continue hi 
weekly wage. 

Before leaving for Europe Nov. L 
Houdini will make another F.P.-I 
feature. He will remain abroad fiv 
months arid may make the foreign vis 
it longer, if accepting a proffered Sout 
African engagement. Upon his retur 
Houdini will return to picture makih; 
with the Famous. 

'•'■ ■ •;•■'■' , 



LARRY COMER 

Doing nicely with his "SINGLE." Wishes to express appreciation and gratitude to Ws 

friends for their co-operation and good wishes. 

Weiek Sept 1— Keith's, Toledo, O.; week Sept. 8— Hippodrome, Youngstov/n, Q, 
V )» , pireclipn, RQSP * CVRTI5, 



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v EAGLE HUT A CLUB. 

London, AugV2/». 

There is a movement on foot :1 
make the site of the present Eagl 
Hut, the headquarters of the America 
military in London, a permanent clu 
for all military and naval peopl 
whether officers or privates. Tr 
Eag|e Hut is/ located on the Strati 
just back of the Gaiety. The scherr 
is headed by some of England's mo: 
distinguished people, including Admi 
al of thejFleet Ekrl Beatty and Fiel 
Marshal Earl Haig. .;„ 

It is proposed to remove the stigm 
.of chaYity from the undertaking by ir 
eluding In the proposed structured 
picture auditorium which shall be ope 
to the public, the income from whic 
will go toward maintaining the estat 
lishment, which shall be more or lei 
self-supporting by charging cost prict 
for lodgings and meals, as for instanc 
a shilling for a luncheon, and i foi 
pence (8 cents) for ' a bed. One ( 
America's big financiers, who is hig 
in the Y. M. C. A', movement, left f( 
America recently and hopes to inte 
est his own people in the movement. 

The idea was suggested by Derwei 
Hall Caine, who wrote to a number,] 
influential people here proposing tl 
scheme. It has been unanimously ei 
dorsed in the highest quarters. , 



"CAROLINA SUNSHINE" 
Pnk. by Ham V«ll T»»* "•, 

m Wert m\t yn* •;■!»•» 



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LOS ANGELES HOUSES TIED UP 
li BY TRA NSPORTA TION STRIKE 

Hundreds of Professionals Left There Without Means of 
Travel. Theatre Managers Use Autos. Pantages 
Theatre Brings Acts From San Francisco 
iL ^ By Motor. 



Los Angeles, Aug. 27. 
/he theatrical business here has 
jren seriously affected by the strike 
-of men working on the steam railroads. 
■\ This strike was called because of sym- 
pathy with the electric railroad work* 
«rs who were already out on strike. 

As a result, several hundred actors 
end actresses are left stranded here. 

By means of an automobile system 
theatre managers have averted any 
serious interruption of business. 
Using motor transports, Carl Walker, 
i manager of the local Pantages (vaude- 
1 ville), brought enough acts from San 
: Franrlsco to make up a bill. He had , 
to arrer his program radically. 

Tiyire were likewise changes of pro- 
gram at San Diego and Long Beach 
made necessary by the 'extraordinary 
conditions. • 

Nat Holt, manager of the. Hippo- 
' drome, used like means to meet the 
situation and get a show going. 

"Tea for Three", during the last two 
weeks at the Mason was due in Chi- 
cago Sunday. It will now be detained 
until Nov. 2. In the meantime it will 
play One night stands through the 
West, reaching its destination by using 
• a flivver corps. 



COLUMBIA PHONOGRAPH STRIKE . 

Bridgeport, Conn., Aug. 27. 

The strike in the Columbia Phono- 
graph Co. plant here, employing 10.000 
men, reached a crisis the other, day 
when the company gave its ultimatum 
to the strikers— that they return to 
work by a certain date or the plant 
would permanently close., ' 
.-/The men did not return by the date 
set, but a few days afterward sent word 
that an adjustment might be reached. 
The company is reported to have in- 
formed the strikers the plant is finally 
closed and that the Columbia company 
will remove it to another city. 

Just what the outcome will be is 
unknown. The Columbia Co. refuses 
to discuss it. It seems to be the 
opinion that if the Columbia company 
carries out its threat, it will put it 
greatly backwards in producing disc 
records. \ 

The strike concerns music publishers 
as the Columbia Co. uses a large num- 
ber of their published songs for -the 
records. The Columbia has been doing 
a terrific business of late, and the loss 
to the publishers through royalty on 
k the records sold would reach a tre- 
mendous amount, if the local plant 
remains closed. 



SHEEDY LOSES GORDON HOUSES. 

Commencing ' Sept. 8, the Scollay 
Square and the Olympia, Boston, both 
operated by the Gordon interests, and 
'praying vaudeville booked heretofore 
through the Sheedy agency, will leave 
Sheedy and book through the Keith 
Exchange. The defection of the two 
Gordon theatres leave Sheedy with 
4 weeks of bookings. 

At one time Sheedy booked all of 
the Gordon circuit, "Doc" Breed, gen- 
eral manager of the Gordon Circuit, 
arranged the new Keith booking con- 
nection, and will supervise the book- 
ings, with headquarters in the Keith 
Exchange (Family Dept). 

; CARELL GRABS EMPRESS. 

j* » '«L .. Chicago, Aug. 27. 
C. 1* Cfrell assumed the manage- 
ment of the Empress this week, mak- 



ing about 18 weeks on this independent 
circuit. The .Empress disconnected 
with the W. V. M. A. because it is in 
a cheap neighborhood which will not 
support any but low priced amusement. 
It will have almost direct opposition 
in the National, which switches from 
third wheel burlesque to girl tabs, pro- 
duced by damage & Irons and Webster 
vaudeville, three .acts, full week. 



CENSbRS* DONTS. 

Detroit, Aug. 27. 
i Dr. C B. Lundy, head of the Recrea- 
tion Commission, the official amuse- 
ment censors, has issued the follow- 
ing don'ts for actors and theatres: 

Don't change your act without per- 
mission from the manager of the the- 
atre. ' 

Don't use language that will hart the 
feelings of the audience, pertaining to 
religion, etc, 

Don't address any remarks to per- 
sons in the audience (use a plant). • 

Don't try to embarras any person in 
the audience. 

Don't come on the stage with bare* 
legs if you have an act with bare 
knees, except juveniles or when wear- 
ing Scotch regulation costume— see 
manager of the theatre. 

Don't have a -spotlight thrown on a 
bald head. 

Don't use immoral talk or words. 

Don't use suggestive action. 

Don't come down into the aisle un- 
less properly dressed— three-quarter 
dress, evening dress Or street dress, 
etc. 

/ Don't lose your head if anything 
happens in the theatre. Keep right on 
with your act as your indifference may 
prevent a panic. 

Don't sing any suggestive songs or 
parts. 
■/■ ■ f$ 

HOUSES OPENING. 

Lyceum, Canton, booked by William 
Delaney, opens Sept- 1.; ' - 

B. F. Keith's new house in Syracuse, 
N. Y„ Oct. 6. 

Poli's Wilkes-Barre,. splitting semi- 
wcekly with Poli's Scranton, opens 
Sept. 1. 

Waldorf, Lynn, Mass.; . Franklin 
Park, Dorchester, Mass.; Codman 
Square, Dorchester, Mass., Sept- I. 



■ MIKE SCOn WILL SAIL. 

Mike Scott, his Irish pedigree, clog 
shoes and pedestal are going to sail 
this Saturday (Aug. 30) for Liverpool. 
That's certain and Mike affirms it. 

The rumor that Mike might go back 
home has been spreading for a long 
time, whether Mike was working. or 
not. . Wednesday, Mr. Scott reached 
New York to see if he liked the boat 
he had selected. The same day Mike 
confirmed the rumor. 

"It's so long," said Mike, "since I 
left the old country I don't know 
whether ray folks are alive, but I am 
going to find out I know some fel- 
lows around Liverpool, and I will start 
working there, gradually getting to 
Ireland. 

"This has been a great country to 
me and I hate to leave it. There are 
only a few real dancers left and I am 
the best of them. It doesn't seem right 
for me to go, but I am 50 years old 
now and I want to get back just for 
a little while. But you wilt see me 
again, boy, and don't let anybody steal 
my stuff. You' remember my act, the 
pedestal clog with the American flag 
draped around my green tights, and 
the pedestal with the brass batons. 
Protect me, boy, for I made up that 
act myself, If you catch anybody 
doing my steps, just yell out 'Mike 
Scott' and I'll bet every. man, woman 
and child will cheer. 

"Look at what I am taking over. 
Here's a ring given me by the Eagles 
of Boston. You can see the eagle on 
the ring even if you can't see Boston. . 
And here's a watch given me by the 
public Look -at the picture of the 
Brooklyn Bridge on the back of it 
And there's a scarf pin, a present from 
my old friends all over the world. No 
matter what happens I keep all of 
them. Many a man has said to me,' 
'Mike, if you are ever broke, don't 
worry, just wire and there's always 
two or three dollars waiting for- you 
here. But the guys forgot to give me 
the money to -wire with. 

"Say, Variety, is my old friend. You 
remember the type you use to print 
my name in, like that. Well, that's 
how I am going to be billed in Dublin. 
'Mike Scott* all over the town, fresh 
from America, The World's Greatest 
Irish Dancer,' 50 years did, never had 
a contract and never broke one, true 
to the Old Sod, a lover of Liberty and 
bless some of those agents who knew 
I was the best dancer in the world 
but wouldn't give me a job. 

"Good-bye, boy. Come down to see 
me off if. you can. I am leaving on 
the East or North river, I don't know 
which yet, but you can fihd me. It's 
the only boat going. out Saturday." 



COOK'S OPERA. 

London, Aug. 27. > 
Will Marion Cook has arranged to 
produce a new opera here. 

Cook came over with a colored or- 
chestra, which has been a big hit. 



WiUa Holt Wakefield in Loudon. 

London, Aug. 27. 
Willa Holt Wakefield will not return 
to America in the immediate future. 
She_ recently returned from South 
Africa but missed her boat a fortnight 
ago. Monday she opened at the Ham- 
mersmith. 



NEW ACTS IN CHICAGO. 

: " '* Chicago, Aug. 27. 

New acts in process around Chicago : 
Paul Rahn and Collette Southern, talk- 
ing and songs in "one, 1 ' special drop; 
McGreevy and Doyle, full stage 1 sketch 
with songs; special set; Marcia Moore, 
in "Boston Johnny," two people com- 
edy dramatic vehicle full stage (Ernie 
Young); "The Suburbanites," with 
Frank and Nay (Ernie Young) ; 
Maxine Alton & Co., in "Well, Well," 
full stage set, 3 people, special scen- 
ery; Irma and Romola, piano and sis- 
ter act, full stage, songs and talk; 
Van Runkle's Bathing Girls, 5 girls 
with two reel special film; "Help, Help" 
(Boyle Woolfolk), with Jack Trainor 
and supporting company of five, in- 
cluding Annabelle Neilson, full stage 
special set, farce plot and songs and 
dances. 



10-20 Grind at Wilson Avenue.. 

Chicago, Aug. 27. 
The perplexing problem of a policy 
for the Wilson Avenue- Theatre was 
finally settled by deciding on Webster 
continuous vaudeville at 10 and 20 cent 
prices, a style of amusement never be- 
fore tried at this aristocratic neighbor- 
hood house, 



New Theatre in Havana. 

Hector Downe sailed Aug. 27 on the 
Zacapa for Havana where he intends 
to locate and buy property suitable to 
build a theatre and cafe on. 

He is being backed by Atlantic City 
interests, and after this trip will come 
back here to get building materials, re- 
turning again to Havana in November. 




FORUM. 

Los Angeles, Aug. 15. ', 
Editor Variety:. 

It has recently been brought to my 
notice that there is a certain person 
endeavoring to obtain bookings by the 
use of my name. Having worked hard 
to establish myself for years and al- • 
ways employing the best help obtain- \ 
able, I take advantage of this method 
in asking all managers and agents to 
assist me in' protecting myself .from, 
any further infringements. I ask for a 
prompt interference with this ghoul, 
as such impositions will speedily stain 
my name and possibly eventually make 
it unpleasant for my agent and my- 
self. To say the least of how unpleas- 
ant it may make it for this "Johnny 
New-comer." 

Thankfully yours, 
The Only Ben Hassan ' 



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Aug. 15. 
Editor Variety: 

In regards to the complaint against 
Brooks and George by Mr. Sweatman 
I wish to give a few names who know 
I am not only the originator of 3b6 
Clarinet playing, but were playing it 
before Mr. Sweatman: Harry Weber, 
Herman Weber, Ralph Dunbar, Ten- 
nessean Ten, Western Vaudeville and 
Mr. Sweatman. 

I believe I am the .only man in the 
country that really plays 3 Clar, three 
different tunes of harmony or the same 
as three people singing. Am willing 
to do this before a jury any time to 
show. 

I am a master originator and not an 
imitator. 

Horace George, 
(Brooks and George) 



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PALACE'S POLICY OPENS WELL 

Milwaukee, Aug. 27. 

The aew vaudeville policy at the 
local Palace, patterned after that in- 
stalled at the State-Lake, Chicago, 
opened Monday in a very satisfactory 
way. Th« day drew 2,000 more admis- 
sions than were in the Monday pre- 
viously. 

The vaudeville, partially booked by 
George Gotlieb in New York, who also . 
handles the State-Lake, consists of 
seven acts. Besides there is a picture 
display inclusive of a feature film. JPhe 
house gives four shows daily with the 
acts doing three performances. ' 

The Majestic, owned by the same 
interests as the Palace, plays the regu- 
lar big time twice daily vaudeville here. . 
It did not seem affected Monday by 
the increase in the Palace attendance. 



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HOUSES CLOSING. 

Morrison's, Rockaway will close tbr 
day after Labor Day. ;• f 



:■■ I 



MUSIC INJUNCTION. 

Jerome H. Remick, through Attorney 
Abner Greenberg, served papers on the 
Fred V. Bowers Music Co., asking for 
an injunction restraining the further 
publication of the defendant's "Sa- 
hara" number and praying for an ac- 
counting of the profits, alleging unfair 
competition and infringement on their 
"Sahara" number, the hit song of 
"Monte Cristo.V The Bowers song 
is named after the Parker Read photo- 
play, "Sahara," in which Louise Glaum . 
is starred. 

No answer to the complaint has yet 
been filed. 



BIRTHS 

Mr. and Mrs. Bert*Skatelle (The 
Skatelles), at their home in Los An- 
geles, Aug. 16, son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cardinal at 
their home in (New York, Aug. 24, a; 
son. V 4H 

Mr. and Mrs. Winthrop Ames at 
their summer home near Boston, 1 last 
week, son. 



Bensee and Baird deny the report 
they have separated. It was so re- 
ported some time ago. 









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..:,.-. .. 










VAUDEVILLE 



ERNEST EDELSTEN IS HERE 

TO GET TALENT FOR LONDON 



AC f 

Represents Edelsten, Murray and Dawe, Well Known Eng- 
lish Agents. Controls 200 English Turns. Headquarters 
With Harry J. Fitzgerald. Will Give Artists 14 to 
20 Weeks. Should Not Fear Tax, He Says, 



" ! ■ -.'; 



.■..-■ 

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i; 



Ernest Edelsten, one of the leading 
theatrical agents of Europe, reached 
New York this week. Mr. Edelsten 
will remain on this side about 10 
weeks, visiting many cities in quest 
of stage talent for the English halls 
arid productions. It is about six years 
since he last saw New York. 

Mr; Edelsten's firm in London is 
Edelsten, Murray & Dawe, a com- 
bination of agents formed some sea- 
sons ago. They control the bookings 
of 200 or more of the best known 
English turns. Since entering into the 

Eartn ership, the members of the firm 
ave extensively placed artists for 
revues, musical comedies and other 
speaking stage productions, besides 
retaining a specialty in the handling 
of vaudeville acts. 

Tommy Dawe is expected over here 
next month. He will accompany Albert 
de Courville, who is due to then make 
■ his annual visit. Paul Murray, the 
other member of the firm, will likely 
reach New York next spring. 
.While in New York, Mr. Edelsten 
will make his^ headquarters ' in the 
agency of Harry J. Fitzgerald, in the 
New York Theatre building. Mr. Fitz- 
gerald is the firm's American repre- 
sentative. 

Speaking of English conditions, Mr. 
Edelsten said the variety halls of Eng- 
land maintained a high speed in profit- 
able business during and after the war. 
There is no prospect of it diminishing. 
He is prepared, he says, to give artists 
chosen by him for English engage- 
ments hard and fast contracts for 
from 14 to 20 weeks, with optional 
time after that. 

Speaking of the English income tax, 
Mr. Edelsten pronounced the reports 
of it reaching this side as greatly 
exaggerated. -He has with him an 
authentic record of taxes, compiled in 
London by an expert, and. the per- 
centage of tax as shown by it appears 
quite mild, much below the percentages 
previously reported. The tax estimate 
is based on the assumption that one- 
third the gross amount of income will 
be allowed as a deduction for ex- 
penses. .Mr. Edelsten stated the de- 
duction allowed would probably reach 
more 'than that in the large majority 
of cases. 



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IN AND OUT. 

Reo and Helmar replaced Kane, 
Kearney and Moore at the Orpheum, 
./ St Paul, last Week. The former were 
forced to withdraw owing to an ac- 
cident. : 



IN AND OUT OF SERVICE. 

Billy Boston and Minnie Vaughn 
returned from abroad Saturday on the 
Prince Frederick Wilhelm after seven 
months' service with the Ovcrtrrere 
Theatre League. Lois Chalfont, Laura 
Carpenter, Ida Brooks Hunt, Blanche 
Seymore, Mr. and Mrs. William 
O'Claire and Elbert and Huntington 
were on the same ship. 

Harry Haley, formerly of Haley and 
Mcintosh, has returned from overseas 
with the Y. M. C A outfit. Harry 
brought back with him a Pomeranian 
Spitz dog who traveled with him 
through the battle fields of France, 
Belgium and Germany. Haley was 



u- 



with the Six Harps, who entertained 
at the Front. 

Will Lea, father of Emily Lea, just 
.returned today on board the "George 
Washington," after, serving nine 
months overseas as a Y. M. C. A. en- 
tertainer. Mr. Lea was better known 
to the profession several years ago 
when he played with the Three Lu- 
cifers. » 

Sergeant James Finn eran, of the 
headquarters company, 11th Infantry, 
after IS months overseas was dis- 
charged July 29. 

; SPORTS. 

The Lights baseball team handed the 
Universal Film (Ft. Lee, j N. J.) nine 
their first defeat of the season, last 
Saturday afternoon, at Freeport, L. I., 
by. a score of 4—2. Approximately 200 
rooters, combined with a band, accom- 
panied the ball players from across the 
Hudson, but their constant cheers 
failed to bring another victory for the' 
New Jersey aggregation. 

Saturday (August 30) the Universal 
nine will meet the VAiUETY-Loew team, 
in their second game of the scheduled 
3'-game series, at Dyckman Oval, 207th 
street - and Broadway, - starting at 2 
p. m. ' .:■'•:■■■ 

The baseball game between the Ac- 
tors and Song Writers, Sunday after- 
noon at the field day outing, was won 

by the melody merchants by a score of 

STANDING OF CLUBS. 

W. L. P.C. 

VAMBTY-Loew ......... 4 1 .800 

Universal (Ft. Lee, NJ.) 3 1 .750 

Lights .' \l ■ 6 .666 




J. GORDON BOSTOCK 

Author — Director — Producer 
1403 Broadway, New York City 

I want to buy Plays, Musical Comedies, 
Sketches, Songs and Vaudeville Acts of all 
kinds. 

Stars and clever people looking for a vaude- 
ville vehicle, see me. I will finance and pro- 
vide everything. 

I personally book my aets on the bfg tlm« 
through the offlct of my brother. CLAUDE 
\V. BOSTOCK. 



NEW ACTS. . ■> 

"Jazzmaniacs"' (Aaron* Kessler). 

Olive Le Compte, songs. 

Jimnu'e Dwy'er (Madrid & Rose). 

Sylvan and Copeland, blackface. 

Rose and Rice (2 women). 

Hendrickson and Stone (2 men). 

Three Beatties, dancing. 

Gildea and Phillips. 2 men comedy. 

Ernest M. Jacobs and Cleo Miller 
(Ray H. Leason). 

Kenny and McCune (Charles Fitz- 
patrick). 

O'Connor and Sullivan, sketch, "The 
Biff'S OS" 

Ben' Hassan in "On the Old Clothes 
Line." < / 

Anna Wheaton and Harry Carroll 
(M. S. Bentham). 

Bates and Caldwell, 2 men, operatic 
singing. . "..-'• 

6 Jolly Jazzers, featuring Jack Kelly 
and Gail Kane (Dave SabTosky). 

"The Movie Maids," 10 people, star- 
ring Frank Leab and Sam Kessler 
(Leab & Kessler). 4 

La Temple Co. in "Plate Glass Illu- 
sions," "Spirit World," 2 men and 2 
women, farce comedy playlet. , 

Joe F. Willard with .a new partner, 
Joe P. Hamilton, in "In Africa'* (black- 
face) (Harry Weber). 

Walter McManus, formerly of Ar- 
gonne Players and with the 77th Di- . 
vision' in France, has returned to the 
U. S. and will re-enter vaudeville with 
a two-act (Max Hart).. , , 

MARRIAGES. ~ 

Sergt. Charles W. Hamp (Janet of 
France) to Elizabeth Kephart (non- 
professional) at Altoona, Pa., last week! 

Mae- Monsette ("Colour Gems") to 
Dr. John' A. Carter at Chattanooga, 
Teiin., July 12. 

James, Bin-ton Pond to Abbie Clarke, 
Aug. 20, in Jersey - City. The bride- 
groom is the son of Major Pond, 
founder of the Pond Lyceum Bureau. 

Olga Steeb, the piano virtuoso, mar- 
ried' Charles Edward Hubach, of New 
York, Aug. 25, in Los Angeles. Hubach, 
formerly a professor at the University 
at Redlands, is now a vocal instructor. 

Edwin (Poodles) Hannaford to Grace 
White, in New York, Aug. 20. The 
bridegroom, ia a clown with the eques- 
trian group which appeared at the 
Hippodrome last season. The bride 
is with the same troupe. >:*'" 

.Dorothy Casiner Regal* to Frederick 
John Balshofer in Salt Lake City, June 
30. The couple are residing at Holly- 
wood, Cat The groom is a picture di- 
rector. The bride was married twice 
before. .She was recently divorced 
from John J. Collins (Keith Exchange). 
Her first marriage was to Louis Winch, 
a vaude villian. 

Gertrude Hamilton to David Harvey, 
a non-professional, in New York, last 
week. The bride was formerly in "La 
La Lucille." Her sister is Betty Ham- 
ilton. Mrs. Harvey was recently di- 
vorced from Lieut. Bruce Field Hig- 
ginbot ham, an army officer, whom she 
wed a year ago, the decree having 
been secured by the husband in De- 
troit on the grounds of cruelty. r 

BURLESQUE ENGAGEMENTS. 

William Clark replaces Lew Sidman 
as manager of "The Sport Girls." Mr. 
Sidman' resigned. 

Jack Miller replaces Charles Wilkins 
in 'The Bluebirds." 

Maude Rockwell, prima donna, Ac- 
ademy stock, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Eddie Kane Taken III. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Aug. 27. 
Eddie Kane, principal comedian with 
the "Hip Hip Hooray Girls," who was 
taken seriously ill in this city Aug. 17, 
was able to leave the Crouse-Irving 
Hospital on Saturday. Kane suffered 
from the grip and tonsillitis, and col- 
lapsed after a dress rehearsal; His 
place was filled by Thomas Grady. ^ 

"CAROLINA SUNSHINE" ~~~" 

Pub. by Hany Vm Tllltr 

aw wtrt 48th strut • . mm vwk city 



PEEKING THROUGH THE BUSHES. 

Binghamton, Aug. 27. 
Dear johnny: .':$ 

I've been readin' about the strike and | 
I suppose they have you runnin' i| 
ragged shoot in' around coverin' the -I 
different meetings, but believe me we '.! 
have a private strike or some thin* on s 
' up here. -, ''" .'':. ...'^V'-V.;)* 

I think the International Alliance 
of Center Fielders have struck and 
that the birds they are sendin' us to U: 
play our outfield are all "scabs" .% :■.:..■ -M 

I wrote you about that momin' g e <r 
named "Fluke" that we tied a c»«l«<\j>J 
last week, well we just had an* ;■;•'-— m 
bloomer this week, although at •'»; | 
this egg got a tough break. You km. ^ ii 
we've been try in' to get a center fieldt, 
fer over a month and have tried out 
enough ball players to supply a new 
Federal League. 

Well this week we took a chanct r 
with a guy that Moe Schenck recom- 
mended to Chick and he looked like be 
might get a break, but luck Wirt 
against him. He reported and he wur | 
smaller than Gillespie. And I thought f 
Gill wuz the smallest user of Sloans ; 
Liniment that I. ever lamped in : : th'efj' 
national pastime. ;: / 

The day before he got here thejr (M 
moved our center field fence back 
three feet after that wise crackin' Bill 
Donovan made the umps measure tho 
distance to it from the plate. They 
found it short, so we had to move it 
back or Donovan would have protested ' 
both of the games we've won this sea- 
son. '■.- '■ \'r' I 

We're play in' Jersey City and Al ^ : 
Schacht is pitchin' against us and 
breezin' them over like buckshot. : We f- 
luck in a run in the first innin' when 



their shortstop kicks fine with a man 



£« 



m third and two down, we don't get 
nothhV that looks -like a hit after that 
and go along 1-0 fer nine innings. 

Openin' the '. ninth, Paul Cobb, «: 
brother of Ty, who is catchiri' fer. 
them, gets a scratch hit on a swingm* 
bunt. Shacht is the next hitter and 
nobody worries, fer Al couldn't hit the 
ground with his hat and tried to have 
a rule passed that pitchers could go 
up to the plate with an ironin* board 
fer a bat ' He takes; a wild cut at the '■ 
first one and .hits -it over our new '■}■• 
center* fielder's bean and it rolls to ths ■< 
fence. I figure a two-base hit, ' biit 
Schacht keeps, on tearin' around and ' 
finally scores without no ball comin' 
back. " r: V: '■••.>■'.''..■-.• •■ ^';".:,-- ; sV^ 

Chick and I run out to see what's , 
the trouble and theirs our new man 
down on his tummy with one arm out 
of sight up to his shoulder in one of S 
the post holes left when they moved "; 
the fence. He lacks about two inches -is 
of being, able to touch the apple, so it 
goes fer a home run and the game jl 
goes with it. Also the new center.^ 
fielder goes with it. Also a letter to 
Moe Schenck goes with it, tellin' him. . 
the next time the Singer's Midgets ft 
have an open week to keep them in '. . 
New York and not be peddlin' thens ' 
around the country as ball players. 
Can yuh beat it? i: | 

Your old pal, >. V;-i^*M 

.:-; r Cfl».;| ' 

BURLESQUE INCREASING PRICES. 

'• Following the lead of vaudeville and 
legitimate attractions, burlesque of- 
ficials of the Columbia and Americai 
wheels look for an advance in admis- 
sions at all their houses. Burlesque 
producers say that they had to raise 
salaries all along the line to secure 
contracts from their people, and this, 
added to the increases of the musi- 
cians and . stage hands' wages, plus 
the amusement tax levied by the Gov- 
ernment, make a higher admission 
necessary. 

This week the Keith Vaudeville Ex- 
change announce* a new scale for the 
Royal, Alhambra, Palace and other 
metropolitan houses, and if the fc' 
lesque boost goes into effect the so- 
called cheap entertainments will soim 
be restricted to the picture houses. 



8 



"!■" 

1 



'*8 



■• r '->;v.: ,-,A.-w. 1 ^ r '-/ 
■.■?<~;:A>:u>:%: : : & 



f VAUDEVILLE 



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> 



CLOTHES IN SHOWS 



The first half of the Palace show this 

week looked and worked out like 

(regular good old-time vaudeville, 

V other than the U. S. Glee Club, which 
'^brought the tempestuous past forcibly 
f to mind. Grace Ellsworth opened de- 

Jmurely in pink frock and-9unbonnet_ 

/.An orchid and blue chiffon foundation 

S -r, enhanced with a silver cloth apron 

■,.y bustle bow back and a pink rof- 

irtlet had alternate rows of pink 

blue marabout as decoration. 

«ich blue sequin cloth formed a 

^all apron, girdle and trimmed blue 

% ^Anna Chance was delightfully 

3 gowned in pussy willow taffeta so 

I smart it spoke for itself as to Jed s 

prosperity in the corkscrew business 

—which also demonstrated the fact 

that small town /"somebodies" don't. 

buy their gowns at home. There were 

side pocket draperies in skirt and a 

j suspender and girdle arrangement of 

'j-tfie silk over a self-toned georgette 

waist, cut low and built up to a be- 

'i'xomjng' round neck, with white filet 

'•Uacev Wide cuffs of blue irridescent 

beads finished the long tight sleeves 

:ind georgette apron and silk skeleton 

waist were outlined with the* beads., 

Lillian Fitzgerald, the third woman 

■to step on the stage, also wore blue. 

*It was a fluffy girlie model, the skirt 

m layers of pointed flounces, the top 

one caught up at sides with tiny 

flowers. Peach silk girdle. tied in back 

;i and there was a broad rolled collar. 

■ Small shaped frills camouflaged for 

'sleeves. Sadie Burt wore a newpolo- 

;: naise . f roe'e of Persian flowered^ silk 

'over a Nile green petticoat, finished 

V at bottom with a buffed flounce. An 
I apricot ribbon, tied about the waist, 
i finished with long ends,' and she wore 
) a becoming poke of the Persian silk, 
i 'Ernestine Myers is one of the few 
frTterpsichbrean artists who dances as well 
^i with her arms as her feet. It's a 

-.pleasure to watch her wave her.slen- 
vncer expressive limbs about in any old 
! . 'dance. Her costumes, what there is of 

(-••them, are delightfully artistic and quite 
I as fresh and attractive as when re- 
viewed earlier in the season. 



..je chorus of the "Step Lively Girls" 
at the Columbia thyTweek is about the 
prettiest, freshest looking bunch in 
burlesque for many a day. Most must 
,be. still in their teens or rejuvenated 
,f*)y happy vacation days. There's a 
little blonde with a million-dollar set 
oi ivories and a small red head of 
prettiness. Eight unusually pretty 
'■ curly-haired dancers in one show 
j should be enough, but the larger girls 
> are attractive as well. 

"This background of vivacious happy 
beauties only show up the charms of 
the leading woman, Catherine Craw- 
ford, more markedly. It surely is a 
:',oy to look upon the wholesome loye- 
ihess of this purveyor of "Fashion 
ho,ws" in any sort of attire, and she 
Ww^much wisdom by choosing sifh- 
le modes. 

The small girls at opening were 
eatly garbed in brown suede coats 
,-ith a lighter shade short pants and 
rench hats, while the taller ones were 
ress€d in Highland costumes. An- 
ther lot were in white with French 
'Vptni cloth military coats trimmed with 
scarlet and military caps. White silk, 
r red striped dresses made up on the 
bias, black and white striped material 
. made in pointed tunic effect, over pea- 
l cock blue union suit foundations, 
/black velvet union suits, with a quar- 
Ijtette of tiny ruffles about the hips 
answering for a skirt, dainty lacy un- 
,' dergarment displays, and sets of good- 
looking' street and af^rnoon costumes 
ire all worthy of mention. 
'•M^iss. Crawford opened in a well-fit- 
. .A<j white silk tricotine suit and dis- 
played a couple of other tailored mod- 
Si " '■} ' * .• 



els, a black one being specially good. 
There was a wine velvet gown worn 
for her inebriate bit, and a stunning 
blue velvet trimmed with wide bands 
of astrakan at skirt hem, wrists and 
high neck. A turban of soft pretty 
gray fur, tassels on edge of sailor col- 
lar and a gray embroidered design on 
pocket, were added attractive acces- 
sories. . -~ 

Margie Wilson, another pretty wom- 
an (also with dimples) like little Anna 
Propp, wore mostly abbreviated at- 
tire showing off their good nether ex- 
tremities. A dainty affair worn by 
Miss Propp for "Oui La La" was of 
gold satin (coat and pants)* trimmed 
with brilliant buttons and frogs and 
rows of tiny irridescents. 

There was a snappy little bit on a 
tight wire by Margaret Taylor, a good 
lookinjflittle dark-haired girl. She 
worked in a white fluffy marabout 
trimmed frock. 

Altogether, if pretty girls, good 

comedians and clever, intelligent read- 

. ing of songs and line.s are what you 

want to see and hear, don't miss this 

splendid entertainment /** . -' 






•• 



STEP LIVELY GIRLS. 

. Arthur Pearson's "Step Lively Girls," always 
one or the best examples of advanced bur- 
lesque, has taken another long; step forward In 
the direction of all-round Improvement. 

At the Columbia this week this ahow looms 
large In the race for all-summer run honors, 
a race, by the war, that begins the first week 
«t every succeeding season and continues until 
all the shows have been sited up and their 
value determined. 

"Step Lively Girls," with a new book by 
Tommy Gray, .Is about the classiest that has 
been ~een on the stage of that thfeatre at any 
time. In its scenic and costume equipments 
it Is essentially In the $2 grade of shows. 
There are six scenes, every one a gem In con- 
ception and the color scheme and the costumes, 
of which there is a prodigal display, are 
dainty, effective and entirely lacking in .that 
garlshness so frequently displayed In burlesque 
productions. In all the details of stage man- 
agement, from the movements of the princi- 
pals right through the entire performance in- 
cluding the work of the chorus, there is al- 
ways manifest the results of a directing skill 
that would do credit to the most expert pro- 
ducers of high -class musical comedy. 

- Mr. Pearson Is deserving of credit for these 
accomplishments and their general effect 
should be taken as an object lesson for the 
guidance of many of the producers who ob- 
viously give scant attention to these details or 
who are unequal to the task of devising and 

- carrying them out 

In assembling the cast Mr. Pearson has 
made -several changes which, with one ex- 
ception, have Improved the general perform- 
ance. Rich McAllister and Harry T. Shan- 
non continue as the principal laugh-getters 
and they succeed perfectly as In former sea- 
sons. The contrasting sixes' ot these players, 
one exceedingly tall and the other cor- 
respondingly short, is a big asset ot 
which they take full advantage without 
overdoing It They have been provided with 
much new material most of which Is rapid lire 
and good and their old stuff, such as the billiard 
table bit and the baby incident fully Justi- 
fies Its reteptlon in the way It is received by 
the audience. A new scene la a health-build- 
ing sanitarium, played by McAllister,' Shannon, 
Quigley and Mundy, is one ot the best spots 
in the show. A Japanese conception, engaging 
the attention of the comedians and Catherine 
Crawford principally, is a dainty classic with 
Just enough of the burlesque, touch to put it 
over with highly satisfactory results. 

Miss Crawford's return to burlesque after 
an absence of several seasons In vaudeville 
and in which she scored with her Fashion 
Parade, Is occasion for all round felicitation. 
She brings a charming personality and a style 
. that la distinctive and that adds pronounced 
class to the general environment of this show. 
Her wardrobe Is extensive and of superb beauty 
and she wears it with stunning effect. 

Another valuable player In this organisation 
Is diminutive Anna Propp who sings .accept- 
ably, dances excellently and gets good re- 
turns for every line allotted to her. 

Jack Mundy, Margie Wilson, Margaret Tay- 
lor and Ed. Quigley complete a cast that meets 
every requirement of a thoroughly enjoyable 
performance. 



Joe Vion, one of the five advance 
men for the Sistine Choir tour, says 
that advance agents have been given 
a military term on the road. While 
arranging for the choir a house man- 
ager recently discharged from service, 
after looking over the complement for 
the choir, insisted Joe was no agent 
but a billeting officer. 



LONDON SEASON. 

(Continued from page 4.) 
of "Abraham Lincoln" at the Lyric 
Theatre, Hammersmith, a disreputable 
little playhouse, until recently devoted 
to "blood and thunder," and hidden 
away in a mean back street, notorious 
for bad business and merely looked 
upon as a "fill in" to work with, other 
suburban dates, but all that is changed. 
The. one-time "blood-tub" vies with 
the West End in the importance and 
size of its audiences and the play has 
brought fame, fortune (?) and aca- 
demic honors to its author, John ■ 
Drink water. The other wonder was 
the successful taking over of the Ken- 
nington Theatre by Ernest C. Rolls 
for the production of "Laughing Eyes." 
As in the case of the Hammersmith, 
"drama date" success has come and ' 
the West End is pouring across the 
bridges to see what manner of show 
it is that dares to run on and on 
South East 

'New productions' are,. for the mo- 
ment, few. Later in the autumn, in 
November, Arthur Boachier will leave 
"Tilly of Bloomsbury" and return with 
a new play to the Strand, where he 
made such a big success earlier in the 
year with "Scandal." Andre Chariot 
promises a new revue at the Prince 
of Wale's, but up to the moment, its 
title, authorship, even the names of 
the principals, are locked in the mana- 
gerial bosom. Owing to protests raised 
on account of the Hungarian national- 
ity of the authors and composers of 
"Sybil," Sir Alfred Butt will not pro- 
duce the piece at the Lyric, as orig- 
inally intended, but in all probability, 
"Birds of Paradise," originally pro- 
duced in America in 1911, will find a 
home there, although Laurette Taylor, 
who should have played her original 
part, will be unable to create it on 
this side owing to her previous New 
York engagements. 

Early in September, Lee White will 
return to the Ambassadors in a new 
revue which will be produced by J. 
W. Jackson, who is responsible for 
"His Little Widows." She will be again 
principally supported by Clay Smith, 
who will also be responsible for many 
of the songs. Henry Ainley goes to 
the St James with an adaptation of 
Tolstoi's "Reparation" (known as "Re- 
demption" in America). 

Cyril Maude is sure of an enthu- 
siastic reception when he again ap- 
pears before a -London audience in 
a new play, "Lord Richard in the Pan- 
' try," and Gerald du Maurier will pre- 
sent a new Sutro play. Gladys Cooper 
is busily looking for a theatre in which 
to house her newly acquired Somerset 
Maughan "Home and Beauty," while 
"Eastward Ho" at the Alhambra will 
' bring Violet Loraine back to her num- 
berless West End admirers. "Who's 
Hooper?" is in active rehearsal to fol- 
low "The Boy" at the Adelphi with W. 
H. Berry with Cicely Debenham and 
Nellie Taylor in the cast, while C. B. 
Cochran (purveyor of hygienic plays 
and promoter of prize fights) has a 
few dozen new plays and attractions in 
his pigeon holes — among them "Mag- 
gie," an Anglo-French operetta; M Af- 
gar," an' extravaganza by Cuvillier, 
whose "Lilac Domino" delights crowd- 
ed houses at the Empire, shortly to be 
gutted and made into an enlarged mu- 
sic hall ; "The Eclipse," a musical farce 
by Fred Thompson and E. Phillips Op- 
penheim, with music by Herman 
Darawski and Melville Gideon. In this 
Harry Welshman will return and Mary 
Burke, wife of the opera tenor, will 
make her London debut. At the Kings- 
way Arthur Gibbons will reproduce 
"The Rotters," by the author of "A 
Temporary Gentleman," a failure which 
by pluck and keen showmanship he 
has turned into a solid financial suc- 
cess, while an attraction eagerly looked 
forward to is the re-opening of Olde 
Sadlers Wells as a theatre of the "bad 
old days" by Ernest C. Rolls. 
In the provinces things seem fairly 



I 



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& 



HURTIG & SEAMON IN SUIT. 

"A suit involving the Yorkville 
theatre at 86th street was filed recently 
by Theron H. Sammis, temporary ad- 
I ministrator of the estate of Mrs. Sarah 
Duffy Hurtig, sister-in-law of Jules 
'2sHurtig of Hurtig 4k Seamon. Accord- 
ing to the complaint, Mrs. Milltcent V; 
Hearst, wife of William R. Hearst, 
holds a note, amounting with interest 
to $4,728.83 against the estate of Mrs. 
Sarah Duffy Hurtig. The note is se- 
cured by SO shares of stock of the Tap- 
pan Realty Company (par value $100), 
owners of the Yorkville theatre. The 
balance of the stock, 100 shares, is 
owned by Jules Hurtig and Harry Sea- 
mon, who are officers and directors of 
the company. 

Sammis asserts Hurtig & Seamon are 
officers, directors ana stockholders in ■': 
the Arrowhead Realty Co. According 
to the complaint Mrs. Hurtig pledged . 
her Tappan stock with Mrs. Hearst, 
but Sammis says he now has the stock 
in his custody as temporary adminis- 
trator. Sammis states the Yorkville 
theatre property is subject to a first 
mortgage of $110,000 held by Jacob H. 
Schiff. Of this $20,000 hasr been paid, 
There is a second mortgage of $215,000, 
of which all but $5,896 has been paid, 
held by Loew's. Consolidated Enter- 
prises. Sammis alleges that a third 
mortgage for $15,000, which is on 
record, purporting to have been exe- 
cuted by the Tappan Realty Co to the 
Arrowhead Realty Co., "was made and 
delivered without consideration and in . 
fraud of the Tappan Realty Co. and its 
stockholders and creditors." 

Continuing, the complaint alleges 
that on July .9 last, Hurtig & Seamon, 
"individually and as officers of Arrow- 
head Realty Co., fraudently and with- 
out consideration, executed as officers 
and on behalf- of Arrowhead Realty 
Co., a paper purporting to be an as-' 
signment of said mortgage to one ';; 
Sarah Cohen," (sister of Harry Sea- ■ 
mon). Sammis asserts on information, 
and belief that the Arrowhead Co., is 
owned and controlled exclusively by 
Hurtig & Seamon, and that Mrs. Sarah 
Cohen is in . fact their "alter ego or y 
dummy." Sammis asserts the trans-'? 
fer of the $15,000 mortgage to Mrs; 
Cohen was made to enable Hurtig & 
Seamon to* have a foreclosure suit 
brought and the property sold under 
foreclosure, to an outsider, "'with in?. 
"tent of depriving the estate of Sarah 
Duffy Hurtig, owner of one-third of 
the capital stock of Tappen Realty Co., 
of its rights and render the stock of 
no value." 

Administrator Sammis says the prop- 
erty in question is worth at least $70,- 
000 over and above all the mortgages 
' on it, including the alleged fraudulent 
$15,000 mortgage. Of this $70,000 b,e 
says the estate of Mrs. Hurtig is en- 
titled to one-third. ..-.'• 

The administration asks the court 
to declare the latest mortgage fraud- 
ulent and voidand grant an order can- 
celling and discharging it of record. 
He also requests an injunction pre- 
venting Hurtig & Seamon and Mrs. 
Cohen from taking any steps to fore- 
close the $15,000 mortgage. 

Mrs. Hurtig died at St. James, L. L, 
March 18, leaving a will that has not 
been probated. 












• 






promising. The road managers report 
good business everywhere, although 
they curse the railway and other trans-" 
port, and a goodly number of new pro- 
ductions are settled. Booking is bad, 
however, many shows being almost : 
crowded off the road by much less suc- 
cessful attractions who, however, took 
the precaution and had the pluck to 
book well ahead. Another probable . 
reason of road congestion is the num- 
ber of soldier-actors who, having heard 
the wondrous stories of prosperity, 
have rushed into management imme- 
diately they became demobilized and 
got their hands upon their gratuities. 



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London, Aug. 3. , 

Wilkie Bard has been compelled to 

postpone his American bookings owing 

illness. - He will, however, cross to 

the other side in the near future. 



Talbot OTarrell, now delighting 
crowded houses with "That Old Fash- 
ioned Mother of Mine," goes to Amer- 
ica at the end of the year and opens 
at the Palace, New York, early in 
January. Eddie Darling arranged the 
engagement while here. ; 



Billy Reeves, the original "drunken 

swell" in Karno's "Mumming Birds," 

and one of the first big "picture" stars, 

returns to his native land, opening 

. with a single -act at the Empire, Bir- 

i mingham, tomorrow (Aug. 4). / 

Horace Reeves reports that owing 
to the alleged uncertainty of things j 
over here, many of his "bookings" are 
falling through. Among the American 
artists and turns whose vists to 
Britain are postponed are Seabury and 
^.Shaw. (who -.should have opened here 
* three weeks ago); William Gaxton, 
with his act "Kisses." Bernard and 
-puffy, Patricola, a number of other 
I big "top" of the bill" acts are being 
negotiated with, but owing to the fear 
oi being landed in a world of imaginary 
-Unrest, the negotiations are not pro- 
ceeding as healthily as might be 
wished. Among those who are braving 
the "uncertainty" are Knapp and Cor- 
nalla (who open up in September), the 
IJellclair Bros., Peppino and Perry. 
The Alexander Kids are already over 
and open at the Palladium this week. 



Lou Edwaxdes, who is primarily 
guilty of bringing the "Jazz" to the 
music halls of this country and pre- 
sented that grotesque marvel, "the 
Shimmy Shake," for over 62 weeks at 
the Alhambra in "The Bias; Boys on 
Broadway," goes back to the big home 
of ballet for the new Qscar Ashe pro- 
duction, "Eastward Ho" and will create 

.several new eccentric dances. He 
opens Aug. IS. News is scarce about 

: "Eastward Ho," but, remembering "Chu 
Chin Chow," and also thafthe Al- 

. hambra production is under the con- 
trol of the creator of the His Majesty's 
Theatre sensation, expectation runs 
high and the "bald-headed brigade" 
are girding themselves for the rush 
on the orchestra stalls. 

. - 

Betty Washington, the ragged violin- 
ist, has just finished her eighth engage- 
ment at the Victoria Palace and has 
been spending a week or so seeing 
the green fields and playing the Blake 
houses. She returns to London to- 
morrow (Aug. 4) and is booked solid 
well into 1923. She and Lou Edwardes 
made a big success when they ap- 

Kared together at the Folies Bergere, 
>ri». 



The position of salaried chairman 
to the V. A. F., rendered vacant by 
the resignation of Fred Russell, is still 
going. Although nominations for this 
post have been sought, there have been 
so far no applicants — artists having 
presumably discovered that there's 
some work attached to the job and 
the kicks may be more in evidence 
than the ha'pence. A general meet- 
ing has • been called and it is more 

I than probable the Federation will go 
through a process of reconstruction, 

•7 ending in the election of hon. chair- 
man to hold office for a stated period 
and the giving of more power to Frank 
Herbert and Monte Bailey. Albert 
Voyce was the favorite for the vacant 

^jeb. Meanwhile the Coliseum com- 
mand performance resulted. in the tidy 

,sum of £4,000 being handed* over to 
the Variety Artists' Benevolent 'Fund. 
The whole thing was a huge success, 



■ 



■V if >. ..:,'-• ■ ••:.-.■. ■. . 



the King and Queen enjoying them- 
selves hugely, as did the vast con- 
course of their people. 

Nevil Maskeleyne (David Devant 
being engaged in the 'transitory state 
of turning from a wizard to a movie" 
star), re-opens St George's Hall to- 
morrow (Aug. 4) with a collection of 
new dealers in "Black Magic" Among 
them. Yoga, an Indian master of. mys- 
tery Whom no one has seen before. 
The inimitable Griff, whose bungling 
of tricks is a few hundred times 
cleverer than most artists' accomplish- 
ment of them, is also in the bill. 



An impromptu scrap took place in 
the offices of J. L, Sacks, Ltd., the 
other afternoon, between the general 
stage manager for the Sacks • enter- 
prises and Jack Haskell, who is pro- 
ducing the numbers for that concern. 
According to bystanders, the general 
manager complained that Haskell 
abused the girls, and contemptuously 
called Jack a "damned American," or 
something of that sort. However that 
may be, there was a clinch, the bellig- 
erents were separated and Haskell has 
a -swollen hand as a result of swinging 
upon the head of his opponent. 
Around the Regent Palace Hotel, 
which Jack frequents every night to 
consort with the American theatrical 
colony, he is now known as "Kid" 
Haskell. 

. There are absolutely no new single 
women performers on the English 
music hall stage, other than the re- 
mainder of the crop of old-timers, 
w of thy of an instant's consideration 
for America— or even for home con- 
sumption, for that matter. Not one 
has been developed in years. The dean 
of them is Marie Lloyd, who is rapidly 
deteriorating, artistically and by virtue 
of the inevitable, cruel passage of 
years, and for some unknown reason, 
no new ones have manifested them- 
selves. Some of the female singles at 
home who find difficulty in securing 
bookings might find it well worth 
while to have a try at this market. 
It would be a mighty poor one that 
couldn't command $250 a week here 
at present, with all ' the work she 
wanted. These figures are given me . 
by the head of one of the large music 
hall circuits. Wake up agents— get 
busyl 

• Ethel Levey has in mind a sort of 
touring musical show made up of spe- 
cialties in which she will do several 
different kinds of turns displaying her 
versatility. Nat D. Ayer will compose 
such additional music as may be re- 
quired for the venture. . 

Emanuel ("Manny") Warner, once a 
prcminent agent here, is dead. He was 
about 53 years old and the end came 
at In terlaken, Switzerland. When the 
war broke out he was interned by 
the Germans and by the time he was 
released and able to get to Switzer- 
land, his health was seriously under- 
mined. 



Wilkie Bard is preparing a new song 
scene, to be called "The Coffee Stall 
Keeper," and, as may be readily imag- 
ined, it gives opportunity for the in- 
troduction of any sort of characters 
as feeders to his impersonation. 



Contracts have been signed between 
Rupert D'Oyle Carte and Gilbert 
Miller for the revival by Carte of a 
series of Gilbert & Sullivan operas 
at Prince's, commencing Sept. 29. 

Zomah, "the unsolved mystery," has 
been commanded a third time before 
royalty. Meanwhile Alec Stuart, who 
seems rapidly to be assuming the posi- 



tion as showman to the Royal family, 
is beginning to be bowed down be- 
neath the weight of tie-pins, cuff links,, 
etc, that their Majesties are showering 
on him, j 

Layer Parker will shortly re-produce 
the late Fred Eraney's sketch "A Sis- 
ter to Assist'er" and will be supported 
by Molly Russell, who will appear as 
the "Char-lady." 

A curious side-light on the stage of 
long ago was shown during the evi- 
dence before the Select Committee, 
which is inquiring into the vexed ques- 
tion of unclaimed bank balances. It 
appears from the evidence that the ac- 
count of Mistress Nell Gwynn, of 
Drury Lane, the orange girl who be- 
came a great actress and retained a 
king's affection, was overdrawn -when 
she died. i 

' Tom Craven, clever actor, music hall 
comedian and author of many plays 
and sketches, is dead. Some years ago 
he met with a serious motor car ac- 
cident which put an end to his long, 
and successful career upon the boards. 
"A fellow of infinite jest" he had many 
friends both here and in America, and' 
no enemies. 

Journeyed out to Clapham last night 
to see Bessie Clifford's turn. "Jour- 
neyed" is hardly the word, for the rea- 
son that Miss Clifford called for 
Variety's London correspondent in a 
magnificent touringp car, apologizing 
for it, explaining that her Daimler 
limousine was being overhauled. Bes- 
sie was adorned with about four 
quarts of diamonds and opened 1 a 
couple of bottles of wine in her dress- 
- ing room. -, She is now established as 
a prime favorite over here, judging by 
the reception accorded her on her en- 
trance upon the stage. She still works 
with her accustomed fire and "pep" 
and her wardrobe is richly sensational. 
After the show she entertained a party 
of friends at her 14-room house in 
Woburn square, which testified fur- 
ther to her success and affluence. - 

The autumn has not begun very well 
for' one management at least The 
entire travelling production, owned by 
Grossmith & Laurillard, of the "Boy," 
from the vaudeville having been de- 
stroyed by fire at Liverpool while on 
it's way to Douglas, Isle of Man, prior 
to opening there on Bank Holiday. As 
well as scenery and dresses, the com- 
pany lost all their private luggage 
Incendarism on the part of the Mer- 
sey-side rioters is suspected. 

"Baby Bunting" is in active rehears- 

/ al for production at the Shaft sbury 

and among the cast is pretty Joyce 

Barbour, until lately the "baby" of the 

Gaiety chorus. 

Gertrude Elliott (Lady Forbes Rob- 
ertson) has ended her tenancy of the 
St. James.. After a brief holiday spent 
mostly in seeing other people work, 
she will go to another theatre to pro- 
• duce an American culinary comedy 
called "Come Out of the Kitchen," in 
which she will appear as a self-ap- 
pointed cook. 

Harry Burns, Known for music-hall 
turns and revue, is now, inspired, 
doubtless by the success of the Old 
Vic and is turning his attention to 
Grand Opera. He will produce at the 
Pavilion, which for many years has 
been known as the Drury Lane of the 
east and will open with "Faust." "The 
Bohemian Girl/' "Maritana," "II Trova- 
tore," and "Cavalleria Rusticana" will 
follow. 

Henry Ainley is starting on a prov- 
incial tour with his Tolstoy play "Rep- 
aration." After trying the piece out 
he comes with it to the St. James, a 
lease of which he has taken in part- 
nership with Gilhert Miller. 



Every man in "Lea Rouges et Noirs," 
which Gilbert Miller presented to a 
delighted audience at the Savoy on 
Monday, has been for long months in 
th$ firmg line— more, before the war 
every man was an actor. 

- 

Returning from a motor trip to** 
Brighton last Sunday, the car con- 
taining Mr. and Mrs. Leon Errol, 
Daphne Pollard and her husband and 
Jack Haskell, was run into by a huge 
motor lorry, smashing the car andK-. 
throwing its occupants into a ditch** "Na 
There were no casualties. ^W^ 



CIRCUS BLOWS UP. 

- Columbus, Aug. 27. 

Frank P. Spellman's America s Mo- 
torized Circus passed away at Coshoc- 
ton, after a tour embracing three Ohio 
cities. . 

The Kelly-Springfield company seized 
the 40 auto trucks employed to move 
the circus. It was reported the people 
with the show were stranded at Co-'' 
shocton, though a few got out and 
reached here. There is no late report 
what became of the others. Nearly all 
the remainder of the circus property is >: 
reported held at Coshocton under at- 
tachment. . : .. 

The show started from Columbus. 
Immediately court proceedings by. 
claimants for money due were started 
against it. The management said a 
couple of dates were missed owing to 
bad. roads and the impossibility of the 
autos going over these roads at night, 
making the jumps. 

The Motorized Circus was promoted ' 
by Spellman and had been incorpor- 
ated in this state. It is understood a 
stock selling scheme that went on for* 
two years or more, preceding the ad- 
vent of the circus, brought the promot- 
ers considerable money. A liberal coin- ■ 
mission was given solicitors who sold 
the stock. 

The motoring idea of a traveling cir- 
cus was ridiculed by circus people from '---■ 
its first announcement, but a somewhat 
glowing prospectus with glib salesmen 
sent the stock into many an ignoranf 
layman's hands. ' 



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MONDAY MORNING. 



By W. DAYTON WEGEFARTH. 
At nine they start to wander In, ■'■'■- 

A llttU sleepy-eyed, and perhaps, 
A trifle petulant and cross, 
For railroad "jumps" ara irksome things, 
Of cindered bertha and Jolting wheel*, : - 

To fray the nerves. ->'. >~ 

And when they've left their grips and check!, 
And looked through all the thumb-marked mall, 
They very quietly slip out.— ' V ^,-> 

"Out front," whore all the billing to, '<-•-: 
And there they gaze at every frame 
With hung'rlng eyes. 

And If they find their names displayed, 
In letters black and corpulent, \ 

Their faces seem to brighten up; N '' 
And they forget their weariness, . : ;-.i; 

In saying flattering things about 
The manager. .. .... : ..^. 

But should a typo exiguous. 

Set forth their mellowed artistry, " .V 

And photographs of them are few, 

TheBe players, of the calcium light, 

Are sure to pout and mutter threats 

That aren't nice.' ■-■;.. : ' v -S 



And If, In Sunday's peaceful game. 
The leader's "roll" bad taken flight, 
It's very probable that be 
Will play their music dismally, 
And blame It on the actor f oik,— 
..Or on the drums. 

:■■:-: K •; ; ; . 

And how the stage director tries, j 
To make them think the up- stairs' 
Are better than the ones below I ■ 
Yes, how be tries, and lies, and lies. 
To circumvent a wrathful storm 
Of temperament 

And then they talk a lot about 
The way tbey "stopped the show" last week, 
And bow electric signs flashed forth 
Their names in scintillating tompsi 
Yet, no one ever questions them, — ' 
For no one hears. 

But thus It Is on Monday morn, 

In every house where vaudeville reigns, " 

Among the«e gentle-hearted folk, 

Who live their Uvea Itinerant, 

Content If they may make us smile,— , 

And perhaps — forget. 

(Copyrighted py.W. Dayton Wege farth;) 

~~" "Carolina mmmmt 

Pub. fey Hany Vt» Titer 
222 Wart 4Mb Stmt 



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LEGITIMATE 









HAPPY DAYS. 

ACT OKB 

FIRST SCENE. ' 
The Kiddies' Dormitory 

(Painted by Mark Lawson.) 

CHARACTERS. 

A Nurse Vera Bailey 

Puck .....Clyde Cook 

Mr. Calico, a visitor Bert Nagle 

Maria Thomas Colton 

Thomai Arthur Hill 

The Little Singer Alice Na«h 

I ,' ' : Another Little Singer Edna Nub 

I) j,/-"',elr. Sand Man '*Bappy" Jack Lambert 

\i- >,>. Dream Man Valodla VeatoS 

*\ All the Children. 

Jag— "Let's Co To Fairyland"— AUco mod 
Edna Nash and the PeJama Girls. 
Song— "Jazz-tlmo City" — Messrs. Frohoff. 
Bowlen Froom and Williams and Chorus. 

SECOND SCENE. 

Fairyland 

(Designed by Mark Lawson.) 
(Painted by Tarasona Bros.) 

CHARACTERS. 

The Fairy Queen Belle Story 

Puck .......Clyde Cook 

Mr. Sand Mao "Happy" Jack Lambert 

Mr. Dream Man... Valodla VeatoS 

Cupid Hattle Towne 

( Fairies— Elves— Spritea— Animals- 
Filers— Etc 




I 



:','. «8bng— "Lore la Very Wonderful". Belle Story 
■■■;*. /Song— "Be a Party at tbe Party Tonight"— 
"Happy" Jack Lambert and Chorus. , 
Speclaltlee by: Tbe Four Amaranths, Clyde) 
Cook and Lalia Selblnl. • 

THIRD 8CENB. 
:" "■_;■' Vkea Wwrn Klda . 

Song— "Don't You Remember Those School 

Days?"— Joneph Parson, May Gerald and the 

Hippodrome Chorus. 

FOURTH SCENE. 

At the Clrena 

(Painted by Mark Lawaon.) 
Powers' Performing Elephants. 

FIFTH~SOBN». 
A Book Store 

(Painted by Mark Lawson.) ( 
CHARACTERS. 



ACT TWO , 

EIGHTH SCEND. 

A Street Scene 

Sam Elton's Comedians In "Building a House." 

ninthTcbnb. 

A Flower Store 

(Painted by Mark Lawson.) 

Sonic— "The Stately American Rose"— Joseph 

Parsons and the Hippodrome Chorus. 
i Specialties by Tbe Four Amaranth! and 

Valodla Vestoff. 
Song— "Tbe Marriage of tbe Lily and tbe 
Rose."— Belle Story and the Hippodrome 
Chorus. .. « 

teotbTsobne. 

Before the Carta! n 

>■ The Chinese Jaaa Band. 

ELEVENTH SCENE. . . 

A Chinese Cabaret Restaurant 

(Painted by Mark Lawson.) 
Specialties by : Gblnco & Kaufman, The 

Agousts, Selblnl, Hartley, The Forezoffs. 

Song— "My Slog Song Girl"— Beiln Story and 

Arthur Oeary and the entire Hippodrome 

Chorus. 

TWELFTH SCENE. 
. inside the Hippodrome 

The Great Hanneford Family of thrilling bare- 
back riders— introducing Edwin Hanneford— 
"Poodles," the World's premier comedian on 

Horseback. 

THIRTEENTH SCENE. 
In Any Community. 

Dane Claudius and Lillian Scarlet 
"The Call of the Sixties." ■ 




Puck, the Mischief Maker Clyde Cook 

The Pled Piper .Henry Taylor 



■••••»••••• 



Albert Froom 

Henry Mallla 

.Charles Bart 



•••••••• 



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Mr. Shakespeare 
The Mad Hatter. 

„.. Simple Simon 

Peck's Bad Boy "Happy" Jack Lambert 

The Watchman (Father Time). Win. Williams 

Uncle Tom ....Joseph Froboff 

The Fat Boy ...Bert Bowlen 

and Heroes, Heroines, Vtlllans, Adventuresses, 

Fairytales. 

Opening Cborus to Scene— William Williams, 

Clyde Cook, Albert Froom and the Hippodrome 

Chorus. 

I Bong "Happy Days"— "Happy" Jack Lambert 

and Hippodrome Chorus. 

STORT BOOK CHARACTERS. 

Tbe Tin Woodman. Eddie Russell 

Hood Miaba Fremzo 

Tom.. Joseph Frohoft 

Abanaser .Alfred Harrison 

Red Riding Hood Sylvia Stone 

Fairies from Midsummer Night's Dream, 
Elisabeth Coyle. Clssie Hayden, Francis 
Mann, Inez Bauer 

Cinderella Mary Amaranth 

Evangeline Tina Amaranth 

Little Eva Jennie Amaranth 

Polly of the Circus Hannah Amaranth 

Rip Van Winkle ...William Ricardo 

Lord Nelson... Harry Ward 

William Penn ...Andrew Byrne 

John Qulncy Adams James Byrne 

Admiral Dewey John Byrne 

Benjamin Franklin. Charles Ravel 

Richard III ..William Weston 

Tom Thumb Thomas Keenan 

Heudrik Hudson Steve Mlaco 

Henry via ■ ..Albert Alberto 

Marquette . i . . . .Arthur Hill 

Bobble Hale 

......Alfred Agoust 

1 Abraham' Lincoln Charles Oro 

([ Robinson s Crusoe Benjamin Lewis 

ik DuBarry '. Helen Sboreits 

i'3 Cleopatra Vera Bailey 

l>"V Sapho Florence Pray 

Carmen .'.... Gertrude Meek 

Salome Emma Christy 

Thelma -Louise Bonutora 

Charlotte Ci>rday Mattle Vance 

Helen of Troy.. Frltzte Do Roas 

Orphello ...Alice Poole 

Juliet '. Marie DeToung 

Dolly Varden..... Adele Hart 

Tess D'Urbervllles Effle Langlll 

Cigarette .Ethel Whitney 

Lady Jane Gray. Ethel McCarthy 

Marie Antoinette. Stella Clare 

Mme. Butterfly Bert Moore 

Oliver Twist.... John Abbott 

sixtbTTcbnb, 

The Artist's Studio 

•ae minute sketches by Bert Levy. 

8BVHNTH~SCBNB. j 

The 'World's Derby 

leaf— "Life's a Race .Arthur Oeary 

and the entire Hippodrome Chorus. 

INTBRMIBBION. 



j - itenry vu 
\ -. PlerYe Ma: 

K_^obVRoy.. 
j Napoleon. . 

1 Abraham ; I 

tl ' '• Onhlnonn >f 




FOURTEENTH SCENE. 
'.'■' Somewhere In SonglnneV 
(Painted by Mark Lawaon.) 
Song— "Somewhere There's Some Girl" — Ar- 
thur Geary and the Hippodrome Chorus. 

FIFTEENTH SCENE. v 

The Hnli of Color* 

: (Painted by Mark Lawaon.) 
Song— "I've Found tbe Girl That I've Been 
Looking For" — Joseph Parsons and the entire 
i -• Hippodrome Company. 

INTER MI38ION. 

. ACT THREE 

SIXTEENTH SCENE. 

..The Golden City 

(Painted by Tarazona Bros.) 
Song— "Beautiful Golden Land" — Hollo Story 

and the Hippodrome Cborus. 
Specialties by tbe Venetian Quartette, the Dis- 
appearing Divers and the wonderful Water 
Girls. 

. SEVENTEENTH SCENE. * 

The Magic Grotto 

(Painted by Tarasona Bros.) 

Grand Finale with Belle Story and the entire 

Hippodrome Company. 

Tbe new Hippodrome show, "Happy Days." 

firoduced Aug. 23 by Charles Dillingham, lot- 
own its predecessors for a pientltude of scenes 
and coloring. But there's no punch to It 
Tbe show is just big, with so much of a great 
deal that the Just big thing will probably do 
the trick as well as something more sub- 
stantial might do. 

The opening performance the entertainment 
ran with epeed. The first part held up over 
the other two acte. The final (third) act was 
the tank. The first and second made up the 
picture. It was in the first act that "A Book 
Store," as the fifth scene (17 scenes In all) 
gave the stage a color effect that made it diffi- 
cult for tbe other colorful groupings to keep 
that pace. The "Book Store" has a couple of 
hundred people or more, each in a different 
costume, taken from the story of the book. Tbe 
stage Is set with titles, with the covers or 
bindings built . up. From them emerge the 
characters. It's tbe best staged bit of the 
production. The scene might be changed to 
the finale of the second part. It would aid 
the performance, for it's too Impressive on so 
early. 

The finale of the first part, "The World's 
Derby." with a . treadmill effect for a horse 
race (Uncle Sam winning), was somewhat lost 
the first night, as the cborus failed to separate 
from the centre of 'the stage In time. This bit 
carries a song, "Life's a Race," sung by 
Arthur Geary. It's not a new thought In 
song numbers and the staging merely follows 
the lyric. "A Flower Store" is a massive stage 
picture, nicely lighted but hurt through the 
"Book Store" preceding it. One ot the song 
bltB is. In this, "The Marriage ot the Lily 
and the Rose," sung by Belle Story.' A couple 
of other song numbers have melody, "Happy 
Days," sung by "Happy" Jack Lambert, and 
"My Song Girl," sung by Miss Story. The 
latter is decidedly reminiscent. 

The Hip show this season looks more clr- 
cusy or vaudeville than ever. There are 
scenes that must have been placed for the 
children only, such as the Chinese Cabaret 
Restaurant, with Its Jugglers. That scene 
opens before the curtain with a phoney 
Chinese Jazz Band of five males who do noth- 
ing but kill time, In the scene are the 
Agoust Family, Lalla Selblnl, Chtnko and 
Kaufman, Frank Hartley, the Pereioffs. The 
big circus act is the Haneford Family, In 
their riding turn,, with " Poodles" Haneford 



the crack rider and comedian of the lot. If not 
of the entire circus world. Powers' Elephants 
alio have tbe stage to themselves, in the first 
part, with one of the elephants doing a funny 
shimmy dance as tbe finale to a big laughing 
reward. • ■' 

Bert Levy with his whistle Is tbe sixth 
scene, running 12 minutes. Mr. Levy la 
wearing a rucbette collar. It tbat'a what it la 
called, and it perfectly sets off his wbiikera. 
He sketches upon the screen while dressed In 
abort breeches, black satin, or maybe silk. 
While looking quite nifty, Mr. Levy, certainly 
does please. His opening remark on the slide, 
"I wish you all Happy Days," pat him in 
right. 

Opening the second part was something 
' billed aa "Sam Elton's Comedians in 'Building 
a House.' "y Sam Elton la an English come- 
dian, in the halls over there. This may be 
an elaboration of the Elton English act It 
looks very English, and that lets it out No 
'one on tbe stage appeared to know what It was 
all about, though they' all ran up and down. 
In confusion, with little comedy. The turn 
seemed to be the building ot a house in a 
comedy way, the act ending with what ap- 
peared to be an Englishman's Idea' of Arab 
acrobats. Another vaudeville turn had 
Claudius and Scarlet doing their old songs on 
the sheet with the bouse singing them. The 
projection was bad for this at times, but tbe 
house Bang just tbe same. The Four Ama- 
ranths and Valodla Vestoff were In the 
"Flower Store" scene. They dance. 

The final two scenes ot the second act held 
more color. One was rows ot black draping 
behind .which girls popped up, Just showing 
faces and hats. All the hats were of tbe same 
design. Almost any design In a face may be 
found around the Hip chorus. There were 
about 120 girls in this number. The next and 
finale of that act, "The Hall of Colors," had 
tbe girls marching up stairs and down, counter 
marching and so forth, with a checkerbox 
pattern for the front of the steps. These 
llgbted up at the finish. The girls were dressed 
in two colors, red and white, balf and halt. 
When they made a final turn, the entire red 
sldo view disappeared with white in Its place. 
"When We Were Kids" was the third scene 
with a large school blackboard full of nutty 
signs. Girls shoved their beads through many . 
holes at the finish, with the other glrla dressed 
aa kids on the stage. Before this was a "Fairy- 
land" scene, and the open number was. billed 
as "The Kiddles' Dormitory." 

R. H. Burn8ido staged tbe production. Ray- 
mond Hubbell led tbe orchestra Saturday night. 
He composed tbe mualc. The orchestrations 
were made by Frank Sadler, What a pip be 
Is at orchestrating a song! Msny a composer 
could bave blamed a bit upon Mr. Sadler, even 
If they didn't and won't The musical director 
of the show is A. J. Garlng, and the atage 
director, William G. Stewart. 

"Happy Days" Is a big show, big enough for 
the Hip that always needs as big a show as 
Charles Dillingham always gives It Bime. 

ACTORS' EQUITY BENEFIT. 

All roads ran to the Lexington Monday 
night and another record . breaking crowd 
Jammed Into the theatre to witness the second 
big Equity Actors' Association abow. At 8.16 
the ropes were put up in rear of the orchestra. 
Tbe crowd was late getting aeated and the con- 
gestion in the lobby was augmented by tbe 
presence ot a dozen or more beautiful Equi- 
tyottea selling programs and candy. 

John Stoele, Marie Dressier and John Charles 
Thomas were programed but didn't appear. 
Robert Emmet Keene was the announcer, and 
said Mr. Thomas was about to undergo an 
operation at John Hopkins Hospital. There 
was no reason given for tbe other disappoint- 
ments. 

Bernard Granville was the unprogramed 
aurpriHo, on eighth, and confined himself to 
one singing number, going Immediately Into his 
Inebriated dance. He was a panic. 

It Is almost impossible to differentiate be- 
tween the' different hits the bill provided. 
Every act received a reception and closed a 
riot 

Marie Nordstrom was first to appear and 
sang three numbers from her vaudeville offer- 
ing. She Was forced to a recitation. 

Mr. Keene plugged up a atage watt with a 
few stories and then Introduced Blanche Ring. 
She had to kill a two-minute reception. "All 
Those In Favor Say Aye" with some punch 
verses tor Equity was a big starter and Miss 
Ring had to encore with "Rings On Her 
Fingers." 

The Duncan Sisters were fourth and made a 
novel entrance seated atop of a piano and 
pushed on by the crew. The be-halr ribboned 

Soutbfulness proved spontaneous and they bad 
> slag a halt a dozen doubles before they 
could go. "Nobody Knows" was a great num- 
ber for them. 

Chic Sale followed with the "Preacher" In 
"one," then to "two" tor the four rural char- 
acters in the Sunday School entertainment 
bit. He gave an Inspired performance. 

Ethel Barrymore, assisted by Conway Toarle, 
In the balcony scene from "Romeo and Juliet" 
was the piece de resistance of tbe evening, 
closing the first half. Miss Barrymore and 
Mr. Tearle opened to a reception unusual even 
to euch popular players aa they are. She was 
a splendid Juliet and he a handsome, convinc- 
ing Romeo. 

After the 10-mlnutes Intermission De Wolf 
Hopper and Marie Dressler'B Chorus in "This 
Way Out" opened. It was staged by Roger 
Gray and Billy Kent Hundreds of choristers 
were on tbe stage. Gray and Dan Healey led 
numbers with different sets of choristers from 
different shows that struck. Hopper did the 
announcing and got many a laugh with patter 
about the attractions the numbers were from. 
The opening chorus was a parody on the open- 
ing of "Yip, YiprVaphank" led by Mr.'Healey. 
Then "Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust the Ac- 



tors Won't Weaken so the Managers Must," with 
comic lyrics. Next 15 ponies from "Oh What 
a Girl," with a parody on "A Good Man Now- 
adays Is Hard to Find," sung by Mr. Gray. 
"Chu Chin Chow." with Mr. Donley and 10 
show girls and numbers parodied from "She's 
a Good Fellow," Sbubert's Galties. "La La 
Lucille," Winter Garden and the dancing girls 
and boys In a great finish from Zlegfeld "Fol- 
lies." Our Kendall did a solo Imitation of 
Ann Pennington. Hopper spoke, lauding the 
principles that inspired tbe large number on 
the stage to quit 

After Mr. Granville, "The Equity Dancers" 
Weston and Lee, Healy and Healy, j'erson and 
McAullffe, De Haven and Nice, White and 
Clayton, Ryan and Hughes, Four Vagabonds, 
Boyle and Brazil, O'Connor and Adams, Grace 
and Burkes, Skelly and Hetder, Kent and 
Gray, Delaney and Foy, opened with tbe old 
hoke. "While Strolling Through the Park One 
Day. ' All In evening clothes they pulled a 
funny routine of old time stepping followed 
by specialties by Person and McAullffe, Dan- 
Healy, Bob Adams, Fred Holder and Boyle and 
Brazil. All hooted at 'the finish and featured 
the Equity yell. They were a tremendous bit. 

Frank Fay with Dave Drcyor at tho piano 
sang "I Used to Call Her Baby" and "Musical 
Comedy Ball." Then be and Keene did ad lib. 
bit of clowning with Keene as a starving actor 
and Fay as the unsympathetic friend. They 
were liked Immensely. 

Jim Barton was next and some of the up- 
towners started to walk. They were arrested 
balf way up the aisles by tbe salvo of ap- 
plause that greeted Barton's first dance and 
hustled back to tbelr seats like a six-day 
race mob when a sprint Is on. Barton did his 
burlesque Egyptian dance and followed It with 
tbe skating number. He bad to beg off. 

Brandon Tynan with hundreds of Equity 
members grouped about the platform on .which 
he Is orating held in most of the house. It 
is an impressive and dramatic spectacle and tbe 
lighting effects Intensified the feeling. The 
responses of the mob swept over the house In 
great wave9 and Tynan's resonant voice made " 
him an eloquent pleader for the actors' cause. 

The comments of the departing throng, were 
unanimous In voting It one of the greatest 
shown New York has Been in many a moon. . - 



WHAT'S THE IDEA? 






, . ' Schenectady, N. Y., Aug. 27. 

F. V. Peterson's offering, "What's the Idea?" 
featuring Rice and Cady, opened here tonight 
at the Van Curler Opera House, playing to a 
capacity first night audience.' The two com- 
edians, who formerly were well known/ as 
purveyors ot the Weber and Field type of 
comedy, are seen In this offering as ratbor 
eccentric characters. While $oth Rice and 
Cady pleased their- audience,, and were called 
upon repeatedly, especially In their parody 
offering, they are not. up to their old parody 
when they attempt to grace the boards as 
"hay-seeders." 

"What's the. Idea" Is presented In two acts. 
Charles 0. Rice Is responsible for the book; 
Walter L. Rosemont wrote tbe muslo: the 
lyrics are by Darl MacBoyle, while Edgar I. 
Schooloy Btagcd the offering. Tbe offering Is 
not much above the burlesque standard, as . 
regards scenery and costumes. Only two sets 
are used and these are not attractive. The 
musical score should be responsible for two 
song hits, However, those being "Mexican Jazz" 
and "I'm Trying to Find a Girl Like You." 
Both numbers went big as did several Others/ 
There la a skeleton ot a plot, tbe events trans- . 
plrlng In Mexico, but the production la ab- 
solutely without atmosphere. . 

Ruthto Francis scored as one of the favorites 
of the evening. The little lady sings and 
dances exceptionally well and has a pleasing 
personality. Other members of the cast, re- 
sponsible tor good work, are : W, C. Dougherty, 
W. Miller, Joseph Berdan, J. Bernard, Ade- 
laide Quelus, Lulu Wolf and Bessie Mae, The 
cborus comprises 14 girls and four men. 

Tbe offering will undoubtedly meet With 
better favor when it Is whipped Into shape. 
There are many .bright moments -In It 

LOOK WHO'S HERE. 

Washington, Aug. 25th. 

"Look Who's Hera" In Its present form can 
stand considerably cutting both in dialogue, 
length of tbe performance and in the boudoir 
auggestlveness. The final curtain did not de- 
scend Sunday night until 11:46, however the 
first Spiegel production for the new Benson • 
Is filled wltb delightful Silvio Heln melodies 
which are bound to be put in the "sure-fire" 
hit class. -r; • 

Ceoll Lean gives his usual ebullient per- 
formance and his numbers were all well re- 
ceived and were done with agreeable enthu- 
siasm and characteristic good nature. The 
women's roles, three in number, which are 
equal in -importance, were in the hands of Cleo 
May field, Emily Lea and Irene Rowan. Emily 
Lea appears as the wife, Cleo Mayfield as the 
matrimonial plumber who repairs -leaks In 
wifely affections while Miss Rowan is the timid 
girl married to the man- with the great name. 
Mies Lea demonstrated tbe possession of a 
rare combination of gifts, bar elnglng was the '! 
best of the entire company and her dancing j 
could not have been improved upon. The ' 
Post said that Miss Mayfleld's forte seems to 
be In a broad sort of satirical humor and the - 
ability to wear stunning gowns. 

The male members ot the cast headed by 
Joseph Latora, Georgia Mack and Richard P. ' 
Temple all gave excellent performances. Tho " 
piece was well received. ■'>••;:'.■,.'! 

IF TOU DON'T ADVERTISE IN VARIBTT-^"" '£ 
■ PONT ADVE RTISE 

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Tnde-Mwrk Ileglrtored 
: Published Weekly by 
VARIETY, Inc. 

BTKE SU.VBpMAN. Prwldmt 
' ■ Timet 8qutre New York 

SUBSCRIPTION 
Annual. .......... .15 Foreign....... *6 

.Single copies, 15 cents 



VOl.LVI. 



No, 1 



Pat Wood is on vacation this week: 

Ann Pennington denies that she has 
Joined, the Actors' Fidelity League. . 

Dr. A. M. Waits has moved to 1679 
.Broadway. 

i .■■'■■.■ . ■ . , ■ • ■ 

..'■ Barton and Ashley are returning 
Aug. 30 to England. 

Ralph Ftraum (Keller Office) left on 
his vacation this week. 

Jin) Slevin who has been in Italy 
for about two years, will arrive in 
New York around Sept. I. ■■'. 



Granrilla, 1 East 56th street, 
New York, is anxious to get into com- 
munication with Jack Clifford and Fred 
Heider. 

Burton and Aaalsy sail August 29 for 
England. They will start at London 
""■ for a two year tour of England, Scot- 
land and Ireland. ' 

Mr/and Mrs. WttUam O'CUra arrived 
I in this country Aug. 23, after five 
I months abroad with the Overseas 
Theatre League. ' ^ 

Violin»ky is going to Delaware 
Water Gap to become acclimated to 
the new prohibition -edict and to await 
' the outcome of the strike. . 

■■'. . ■■ .* .■ * ■ ' ■ *. , 1 .' i - -' ' 

Gun Hill will put out "Keeping Up 
With the Joneses," named after the 
newspaper cartoons, this fall. Joseph 
Herbert is writing the show. 



r : 



1 



Mahal Burke, the illustrated song 
singer, long a favorite with the Fifth 
Avenue audiences, returns to that 
house next Monday, after a summer 
vacation of six weeks. 

■ v 

Phil Baiter was relieved of all the 
wardrobe and street attire that graced 
his dressing room at the Century Roof 
Tuesday afternoon. Baker has no idea 
why he was the only member of the 
company singled out. . 

Lily Lena is reported having brought 
suit for divorce in England against 
her husband, Richard (Dick) Turpin. 
Miss Lena appeared on this side sev- 
eral years ago in vaudeville, doing a 
"single turn." 



Lieut. Dr. Harry W. Martin, the 

Chicago physician, is to be discharged 
from the service this week. He has 
been assigned to Camp Custer for 
nearly a year. Dr. Martin will again 
locate in the Chi. Loop. 
';;'■ . ! 



■ 
I 

u 



Harry P. Derrey has been granted an 
absolute divorce and the custody of 
their child, from Lillian Morley (Lil- 
lian Mor ley and the McCarthy Sisters), 
in the Probate Court of Genesee 
County, Michigan. 

Giants Hungarian restaurant in West 
45th street, near A. E. A. headquarters 
has reopened. A waiters' strike tem- 
porarily closed the eating house, but 
the differences between the owners 
and their help was speedily adjusted 
and business has been resumed. 

• .'■■- ' 

- . 

Louis Weslyn is adapting a farce or- 
iginally written by Hi C. Witwer, au- 
thor of "Baseball to Bodies" and news- 
paper humorist. Although the play was 
originally intended for straight farce, 
Mr. Weslyn and the author decided to 
make it into a musical show, the former 
to write the lyrics and music and make 
the adaptation. 

Johnny O'Connor called on one of 
the magazines, the other day, in re- 
sponse to an invitation. -Since the 
strike Johnny has been running around 
the theatrical district in a car, so he 
carted along Dave Clark on this visit. 
In the office of the magazine were -a 
couple of the editors and the business 
manager. They wanted Johnny to 
write some special stories in his slang 
style and asked what Johnny would 
want to do that. Johnny had taken 
Dave along With him, right into the 
office, so he said,. pointing at Dave: 



FREEMAN BERNSTEIN ON STRIKES. 

"Well, I'm through with show busi- 
ness," said Freeman Bernstein the 
other morning as he tossed a whole 
lamb chop to a cat in Shanley's grille. 
"You know how much I care for 
money. I have credit accounts all over 
and don't need any. . You saw me 
throw that chop to the cat? Well, 
that's what money means to me, bo I 

"But I am sore over this actors' 
' strike. There must be sugar in it 
somewhere and I haven't been able to 
cut in. When I say I don't like money, 
I don't mean easy money. You haven't 
heard about me being at Saratoga 
this month, have you. except once. 
My God, what they did to me then. 
1 "I heard about the strike and came 
right back. I says to May: 'May, 
there's a strike on by the legit actors 
against the legit managers. They 
don't know anything about striking. 
I'll go down and tell them how to 
run it while you Wait here until I 
return with the bankroll from both 
sides.' May kind of looked up at me 
for the first time' in months. Says 
May : 'Freeman, at last I believe you 
have a regular coin idea/ 

"I haven't seen May since. How 
can I go back to her without any 
sugar after what I 'spilled about get- 
ting it. It's the first time I ever fell 
down, and how they have been run- 
ning this strike so long without a 
regular guy like myself mixed in on 
it, I don't commence to know. Do 
you think Mountford has his face on 
the inside of that doughbag. If I was 
sure of that and '.■lew that slicker 
could put it over me when there was 
sugar around, I would just take it on 
the run for the river. 

"What's this strike all about? The 
actors are fighting the managers. I 
know that. But where are the actors 
getting their coin from? Kid, I will 



TOMMY'S TATTLES. 
BY THOMAS J. GRAY. '■* 

Man outside of Palace Theatre read* 
ing sign "U. S. Glee Club" turned M-M 
his friend and said "Has Congress gone 
into vaudeville?" . 

, High cost of men's clothes may. be 
a good thing. It may stop the wide 
leg top trousers the college boys wear, 
when they stand outside of the stage ;- 
doors waiting for the chorusvgirls^^' 

— - -•■•:•■' i^pil 

Thousands of strikes are now takr, 
place throughout the world, jo far, 
however, we are sorry to state, there 
has been no strike reported of the 
fellows who pose for the men's collar 
advertisements. ; , - ; < 



M 



Our Picture!*** Sex Problem Moviei 

The I awful effect of Housemaid's 

Knee. : , ', .•';'-'•■•/ -i- .-■.-;./•-,•:. -^ 

A .sufferer... "■ ' ., 'y' : ''WI 

How it can be avoided. xM? 

Stone floors do not help. 









Carpet tacks should be avoided. 

Experts- discussing, the problem. 

It's effect on children. 

Should this youngster suffer? ' 

Velvet padding helps. 
, -Cured..; • 

This picture presented under the 
auspices of the Silk Hosiery Makers' 
League. 



V 



^tt 



■ > 



vV'<" 



f , 






BEAD ANNOUNCEMENT IN THIS ISSUE 
on Page 56, sbont 

"DAILY VARIETY 

which will continue to he 





.•■...:.. 


' '. . '. 


» 

■ 


' 


! . . ' 


.,' 


.' . ■ ' 





Published Every Day (except Sundays) After the Strike 



Who has given any attention to those 
"Give a Thought to Broadway" signs, 
outside of the fellows who were paid 
to paint and print them v \' : -^% 

% ■ ' .— 

, Sugrwtiona For Home Theatrical* 

^ (in case the strike spreads). VictfOla 
parties. A nice Victrola jparty cim be 
given if you have a Victrola It is 
hard to give a Victrola/party without 



"Here's my representative, you will, 
have to talk business with him." Then 
Johnny blew out to the reception room 
to wait and hear. The magazine's staff 
started to talk with Dave. Their first 
remark was : "We have only 11 min- 
utes to give to this interview, Mr. 
Clark, and let's start it by saying we 
will pay Mr. O'Connor two cents a 
word." "Take as long as you want 
to as sure as I am born," answered 
Dave, "and where does that two cents 
a word come in. We have all the 
words we want. Johnny O'Connor 
knows more/than a dictionary, as sure 
as I am born. Can't I hock the words 
for more, and if there's only 'one, what 
are we going. to do with that?" The 
trio took up the rest of the 11 minutes 
trying to convince Dave they had not 
intended to insult Johnny: Then they 
thought they would see Johnny him- 
self. Going outside they softly ex- 
plained to Mr. O'Connor that Mr. 
Clark did not seem to catch their idea, 
but Johnny insisted that Dave Was his 
sole . business representative, and to 
prove it, asked Dave a few questions. 
After Johnny got through, one of the 
editors remarked : "Are you in this 
business only for a laugh?" and, 
Johnny refusing to commit himself, 
Dave replied: "He's the eat 'em up 
kid, uses a knife v^jth both hands at 
the Automat, and never fell down 
stairs in any condition. He's a funny 
freak, as sure as I am born." 






split with you if you find that out 
for me. Or steer me .against some 
of those managers. You will be in 
with that too. Ill declare you in on 
anything you land, and I'll do all the 
work. I must do something and I've 
got to work fast for I want to see 
May again. 

"How much do you suppose Al 
Woods would stand in the way of a 
heavy touch if I told him how to stop 
the strike? And the Shuberts too. 
The Shuberts must be losing the most 
money. Guess I'll go up against them 
first You tell them the kind of a 
guy I am, that I never fell down on 
anything, that I have taken everything 
and everybody from Porto Rico to 
Camp Upton, and then I will go up 
against them If I leave either one 
of that bunch with their left eye, they 
will be lucky. . . 

"You go fix it, kid, and don't forget, 
you're in. 

"And say, if you see May. will you 
tell her I am after some big sugar 
and couldn't take a chance on missing 
it or I would have been home last 
week. 

"And say, if I don't butt in on this, 
just, make up your mind there's no 
strike. Do you need any money? No? 
How does that happen? Well, it's all 
right, it 'shows you have faith in me, 
otherwise*' you would have said yes, 
afraid that I would make a touch. 

"Guess I'm getting rusty. I should 
have stuck to that open air graft. But 
my time will come again. If I could 
only make May believe that, but don't 
you flop on me, kid. Remember, I'll 
take anyone of them, actor .or man- 
ager, but pick the one with the ready 
check book. I can't stand stalling, I 
must have action." 

'Sim. 



/ 



a Victrola. 

Guaga Din Pk-nici. Get 15 or 20 
friends who recite Gunga Din, pick out 
a nice field, the furtherf away the bet- 
ter, and have them recite "Gunga Din/* 

Pla* Eating Coattst Can be made 
very amusing if some member of the 
family has false teeth. 
- Playing Circa.. Members of the 
family may swing from the gas pr- 
electric fixtures. White shoe cleaning 
fluid makes very good down whitef 






mm 



'* 



We are not interested in the Plumb 
Plan for railroads, but we are in faybF-'if® 
of the Plum Plan for pies and cakes. 1 ^pf 

Tha real comical Mm of th» ttrik* 
JOHNNY O'CONNOR CARRYING & '■ 

cane' ■ ■:.;^\^ : r^mwm 

■■'■''■■'■'/■■■' i4wnai 

Gaiety Theatre could not bp«i wjt#" 

pictures on account of the strike, T^he 
name of the picture was 'The House 
Without Children." 

The theatrical district has never had 
such a season, for free speech, free 
thought, and so little free lunch, with- 
out any free tickets. ™£ 

Senate has 50 suggestions to make 
'"..the peace treaty. .This j>robably 
wdl be written up in the European 
^H, Un i er ^J^ofmg headline, 
America Leads the World-In Sua- 
gestions. .7^ 

By the way, whatever became of 
show business ?, »«v.«uib 01 



Well, ariyhowj those Author meet 
mgs were a social success. 




__n " ■.»'.'" ■'■-'"'•'.•'■.■.'"-•■" 

# * LEGITIMATE 



STRIKE COSTS BOTH PARTIES 

$1,500, 000 IN T HREE WEEKS 

Losses in the Side Lines Also Very Heavy. Estimated That 
Broadway War la Costing Managers $250,000, Actors 
J_ $100,000 and Stage Hands $50,000 Weekly. 

5 Overhead Charges on Closed Theatres. 

Joe Leblang Stung Badly. 



_? 



s y Wednesday rounded out the third 
.<0- week of the strike, with but one leg- 
itimate theatre in New York that was 



if opposed to the striking forces open 
m two exempted houses not counting, 
' • - the Hippodrome and the A.E. A. Ben- 

f 



1 



t 



}.V. 

r. ■ -. 

m. 
W 



I 



efit performances at the Lexington, 
running. The loss to those directly 
concerned with the strike to date is 
about $1,500,000. In addition to that 
there is the loss to the taxi cabs in the 
theatre districts, the restaurants, the 
hotels, the candy shops, the dyers and 
cleaners, costumers and even the little 
delicatessen places in the show district, 
all are complaining. What their losses 
,'V' ■ are impossible to really figure, but 
some idea can be had when one of the 
best candy shops states that its busi- 
ness is off 40 per cent. 

In addition to the million and a half 
loss there is to those who would have 
been active or. interested in the run-' 
ning of the houses that were open at 
the time that the strike started, there 
is also to be computed a tremendous 
loss that is involved, through time be- 
ing lost, by the calling off of rehearsals 
of more than 100 productions that 
would have undoubtedly been on their 
way to tryout points or in rehearsal 
at this time. With this also comes 
into record the losses that are to be 
sustained by the out of the big city 
manager in the week stands and in 
the shorter run towns. Of course, in 
practically all of these one, two and 
three night stand houses pictures will 
fill in the gap, but in the week stands 
there will be another story, 



received via the theatre box-offices. 
The theatre ticket agencies are about 
$30,000 losers on the three weeks, while 
the cut rate places are doing no busi- 
ness at all. The overhead weekly on 
the Jos. Leblang agency alone is $1,600. 
In addition to the New York losses 
Chicago reports that a conservative 
estimate that the losses during the last 
two weeks to the theatres there are 
approximately $200,000. 

GOETZ REVIEWS. 

E. Ray Goetz returned from France 
last week, bringing the rights to sev- 
eral revues. Accompanying him was 
Mistinguett, one of the highest salaried 
Parisian revue stars. Conditions made 
unfavorable by the strike led to ar- 
rangements for Mistinguett's immedi- 
ate return, she being due to open at 
the Casino, Paris, in October. The 
French actress, famed for her beauti- 
ful legs, is credited with having brig- 



WALK OUT ON "LESTER." 

Atlantic City, Aug. 27. 

John Cort, himself, his own execu- 
tive staff and members of the Apollo 
Theatre management set the scenery 
last night for "Listen Lester," when 
the stage hands walked out 

The members of Local No. 77, L A. T. 
S. E., placed a story in the local papers 
this morning claiming the friendliest 
desires toward the managements of 
the local theatres. Hence this walk- 
but was more, a matter of orders than 
of sentiment and followed the depart- 
ure of the union orchestra Monday 
night " 

The trouble started when "Listen 
Lester" arrived minus the "extras" from ' 
the. New York union and also minus 
its own scenery— only a few props 
getting here. 

An injunction obtained Saturday 
failed to hold the men over tonight 
and their walkout occurred just as 
the evening's performance was called. 

At the Globe and Keith houses there 
appears to be no immediate effect of 
the situation as they are playing vaude- 
ville. 

STOCKS OPENING. 

New Bedford, Mass., Aug. 27. 

The New Bedford Players, headed 
this year by Enid May Jackson and 
Hooper Atchley, opened here Monday 
when "Rich Man, Poor Man" was pre- 
sented for the first time in this city. 

The Academy, v Haverhill, Mass., will 
resume dramatic stock under Jake 
White's direction, Labor Day. The 



w 



fc- 



SHUBERT NUMBER POSTPONED 

Due to the strike VakietVs special Shubert Number, announced for 
this issue (Aug. 29), has been postponed. 

The next date will be set and again announced. 



inatea the Apache dance. Jacques 
Charles, stage director for the Mo- 
grador Palace, Paris, was with the 
Goetz party. He will put on a revue 
starring Mistinguett here at the date 
now set for next spring. . ... 

Late in the fall Goetz will produce 



Relief from the situation that the 
Ki strike has brought will naturally reacb "Collette Comes Across," by Glen Mae 
the road manager last. The New York, Donough and Martin Brown, starring 



Chicago, Philadelphia and Boston 

.houses' will be the first to be reopened. 

J If the strike was declared off by to- 

Ji :. rnorrow it is doubtful, however, if all 

v 'the theatres in those cities could be 

reopened in less than from three to 

four weeks' time. 

There are here and there on the road 
at present a few shows that ate 
sneaking by without any interference 
from the A. E. A, although they are 
not Equity attractions and at least 
two of them are owned by members of 
the Producing Managers* Association, 
and they are playing without the aid 
of injunctions or other legal assistance. 
It is. just a case of nobody on the 
striking side knowing what the at- 
tractions are and where they are. 
^ These few shows would naturally be 



Irene-Bordoni. He plans for presenta 

tion here about the first of the year 

the London revue, "U. S." Most of the 



Garrick Being Redecorated. 

The Garrick Theatre, headquarters of 
the Theatre Guild, is being completely 
redecorated in accordance with a color 
scheme designed by Rollo Peters, di- 
rector of the Guild. 

It will open in October with the 
first of five productions to be made 



with Lieut. Gitz-Rice. 



Crane Wilbur Play Tried Out 
San Francisco, Aug. 27. 
"An Eye for an Eye," a romantic 
drama in four acts, by Crane Wilbur, 
of the Louis XIV period, had its prem- 
iere at the Ye Liberty, Oakland, last 
week, with Marjorie Rambeau. 
The piece is well constructed and 



l 

.. ■ 

■■■■. 
i 

? 

1 

I; 

h 

it : 



" contains some good dialog, but as pre- 

| reached 



On the first 21 days of the strike 
VARiBTT estimated the loss was about 
$250,000 weekly in gross receipts to the 
producing managers; $100,000 weekly 
to the actors ; between $45,000 and $50,- 
000 to the stage hands and musicians 
on the21 shows that were closed by 
the strike, not counting the announced 
premieres that did not eventuate. The 
overhead charges on the 35 theatres 



Frisco Musicians Raise $5. 

San Francisco, Aug. 27. 
At a meeting hefd here last week by 
the San Francisco Musicians, a resolu- 
tion was adopted asking for an in- 
that are closedlnNew York City'aTone crease of $5 per man a week, 
are about $4,000 weekly including the 



salaries that the managers are paying 
to a number of those that remained 
loyal to them during the strike, a gross 
overhead of $140,000. The newspapers 
., are, losing about $20,000 weekly on 
their amusement advertising" while the 
Government is out about $75,000 thus 
far in war taxes that would have been 




English cast will be brought over. That by the Guild during the coming season, 

includes Lee White, the American girl During September it will probably be 

who has scored in London, and Clay rented to some outside attraction if 

Smith, also an American, her husband. Business Manager Morris Fink's pres- 

Until the strike is over Miss Bor- ent plans mature, 
doni has gone into vaudeville again . _______ 

Engagement* for the Orient 

San Francisco, Aug. 27. 
Louis Dennison went to New York 
last week to engage people for a dra- 
matic show that he contemplates tak- 
ing to the Orient in November. 

ILL AND INJURED. 

Harry Richards (Roehm & Richards) 
is back at his desk after a* short relapse 
of pneumonia. 

George Buck, assistant manager of 
the Harlem Opera House, is confined 
to his bed with grip. 

Joe Mack is at the New York Hos- 
pital following a serious operation for 
hernia. 

Jennie McLaughlin was operated 
upon for her throat, August 19, at the 
Episcopal Hospital, New York. 

Madam Bartholdi, for years conduct- 
ing the Bartholdi Inn at Broadway and 
45th street as a theatrical hotel, suf- 
fered a stroke of paralysis at Weirs, 
N. H._ late last week. Her left side is 
affected. 

Fred St. Onge gashed his leg when 
making a fall of his bicycle at Keith's, 
Boston, Saturday night, last. He is at 
the home of his parents in Boston. 
The act canceled Manchester, N. H., 
this week. 



The first and last acts are much too 
talky, but the second and third acts 
are in very good shape. . 

With the necessary revising and 
pruning, the show has possibilities. 



The request will be submitted to the 
managers next week. 



May Reorganize "Let's Go." 

San Francisco, Aug. 27. 
It is reported here Ackerman & Har- 
ris will reorganize the "Let's Go" show 
for the road featuring Fanchon and 
Marco, 



GAZ20L0 STOCK 0. K.D. 

Chicago, Aug. 27. 

Frank A P. Gazzolo opens stock at 
the Victoria and Imperial with the 
sanction of the Actors' Equity Asso- 
ciation, having signed the contracts 
stipulated by the organization for this 
branch Of amusements. 

Lorin Howard and Marie Nelson are 
the stars. 

Chicago, Aug. 27. 
Frank A. P. Gazzolo, new lessee of 
the Imperial and Victoria theatres, has 
entered into an arrangement with 
Lorin Howard in a stock company 
plan, whereby two companies, known 
as the Lorin Howard players have 
been organized and are now in re- 
hearsal. One will open at the Imperial 
in "Alias Jimmy Valentine" and the 
other at the Victoria in "Pollyanna." 
The companies will alternate between . 
the two nouses all season. Among the 
pieces to be presented are "Every- 
woman.'iTbe Garden of Allah," "Hap- 
piness," "Upstairs and Downstairs" and 
'Lombardi, Ltd." Among the people 
engaged or the companies are Ada 
Girard, Bessie McAllister, Robert 
Jones, Joseph Stanhope, Florence Les- 
lie, Louise Treadwell, Kernan Crippes, 
Robert LeRoy, Grace Ferrard, Lonise 
Dunbar, Dorothy Baldwin, Charles 
Peyton, Jack Marvin, Roy Elkins, 
Frank Francis, James Nelson, James 
C. Carroll, Walter Davis, Morris 1 Burr 
and Martha Urbank. 



theatre reopens with "Happiness." . 
Irene Summerly and Alfred Swenson 
lead. 



SHOWS m SAN FRANCISCO. 

/ San Francisco, Aug. 27. 

Banner business at all the theatres in 
San Francisco and Oakland is expected 
next week when the big battle fleet 
from the Atlantic arrives here Several 
of the shows intending to move are 
holding over for "Fleet Week." The 
Orpheum, Oakland, which was not to 
open until Sept. 14 opens Sunday with 
improvised vaudeville and pictures. 

The Columbia with "Chin Chin,", third 
week, is holding that attraction for an 
extra week. The show got around $12,- 
000 its opening week, dropped to about 
$9,000 last week and holding to about 
that this week. ; 

At the Curran the "Broken Blos- 
soms" picture is playing to capacity 
at $1.50 top and the indications are 
for three weeks of record business. ' 

For the Oakland show at least one 
-act on the Orpheum bill here will dou- 
ble on the two towns. It is Lloyd and 
Christy. . . • .. 



DEATHS. 

Joseph A. Wilkes. 
Joseph A Wilkes died last week in 
New York. The deceased was one of 
the veterans of the American stage 
and had appeared with Booth. Louis 
James and other stars. His last an- 

Searance was in Belasco's "Good Little 
leviL" 

Leon W. Williams. 

Leon W. Williams died Aug. 22 at his 
home, 1738 West 8th street, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. He had been in poor health 
for a year or more. A widow (former- 
ly professionally known as Madeline 
Clark) and a son survive. The de- 
ceased had been a traveling theatrical 
manager for many years and was very 
well known. . The remains were cre- 
mated at Fresh Pond Monday. 

H. Guy Woodward. 

H. Guy Woodward dropped dead in 
Detroit, Aug. 20, a victim of heart dis- 
ease. He was appearing at the Regent 
Theatre in. that city in a sketch called 
"The Crisis." Mr. Woodward was fpr- 
merly a stock player, having bis own 
companies on tour, and especially well 
known in the south. Several sear on s 
ago he was in pictures appearing in • 
Fox "Sunshine" comedies. 






\ 



I' 'i • (/ 



j • - ■ - ■ . ■ • . 



" ■ . ■• • 



• : 



LEGITIMATE 



k SEASON THIS YEAR TO START 
r WITH VERY FEW SHOWS GOING 

■■---• ^ 

,'■ Acton' Equity Association Send Out a Few Productions of 

Their Own. Will Gompers Approve Sharing Loss As 

jj Well As Profit? Feature Films Now Being 

Generally Shown in Legitimate 

Houses. No Musical Shows 

Now Left 




• • . .- 



I 



With Labor Day just beyond the 
week end New York, Chicago, and a 
majority of fertile theatrical territory 
face the technical start of the legiti- 
mate season with an absolute minimum 
of attractions. 

The actors' strike and the participa- 
tion of organized labor, which now 
.appear to be the dominating factor 
against- the managers, have almost 
completely tied up important produc- 
ing. A number of road shows not 
identified with the Producing Man- 
agers' Association have already gone 
out, with road houses probably 'anxi- 
ous for anything that operates with- 
' out fear of- strike interference. In- 
dications now are that there is no im- 
mediate solution to the strike muddle 
and the start of the new season is 
indefinitely set for Nov. 1, with the 
possibility of it being later than that, 
Or with a settlement, a rapid advance- 
ment of that date. 

From the inner works of the Ac- 
: tors' Equity Association come reports 
of large schemes to send broadcast 
companies which will work on a co- 
operative basis and the road is threat- 
ened with a flood of revivals, older 
players in the main alone being at the 
disposal of the actors. ■ -. 

Among the plays already in process 
of presentation are "A Gentleman from 
Mississippi," "School for Scandal" and 
"The Witching Hour." In the case of 
the latter play, Augustus Thomas is 
said to have- contributed the rights to 
the actors and it is to be sent out 
with the original cast with of course 
the exception of the late John Mason. 

The matter of co-operative presenta- 
tion, which means the casts will re- 
ceive percentages of the net receipts 
.instead of stipulated salaries, brings 
up a question that is being debated 
among professionals. It is that in co- 
operative plans in other industries the 
: : only question in point is a division of 
profits and those profits are in addi- 
tion to regular salaries. With the- 
atricals a different situation arises be- 
cause of the element of risk. Only a 
proportion of theatrical offerings are 
profit making and only when successes 
are registered can there be a division 
. of profits.* Players are wondering 
about the matter of losses and whether 
such losses, If sustained, are to be 
met by the players or by the A. E, A. 

The question goes further and it is 
being asked. as to how Samuel Gompers 
will regard a co-operative proposition 
which works both ways— the equal or 
percentage division of profits and a 
similar arrangement of losses. To 
date, as far as known, organized labor 
has participated' in the profit bonus 
plan but has not enmeshed its members 
in a scheme whereby losses are to be 
assessed. 

Feature films now have the call on 
Broadway. In addition to the regular 
film places there are five legitimate 
houses showing pictures. The Lyric 
has "Deliverance, a picture which has 
a labor topic. The 44th Street has a 
. dual Fox bill still running, it being 
- "Evangeline" and "Kathleen Mavour- 
neen." The George M. Cohan, finished 
with the repertory of D. W. Griffith's 
picture season, has gone under lease 
to Paramount who are showing "The 

"CABOLINA SUNSHINE" 
". Prt. hf H«ny Vee Tllar 

a» We* 4Mb Stmt Niw Yort CJty 



•m 



Miracle Man." The Central has 
"Checkers," while the Park will have 
"The Right to Happiness." Some of 
these houses were. not closed by the 
strike and the latest order provides 
that no further strike closed houses 
shall open with pictures* Otherwise 
there is little doubt but that most of 
the darkened theatres . would blaze 
forth into films until the strike is over. 

Qne theatre fell under the N order of 
the stage hands' union and was denied 
the right to reopen with pictures. That 
was the Gaiety, which was advertised 
to start Sunday with "The House 
Without Children- ft 

AH of New York has but four leg- 
itimate attractions open this week, 
Broadway- having but two of those— 
"John Ferguson" at the Fulton and 
"At 9.45" at the Playhouse. The former 
is showing in a house leased by a non- 
member of the managers' association 
and played in by an all Equity cast. 
The latter, a'W. A Brady show, is the 
sole remainder of the shows called out 
by strike and continues in defiance, 
that possible because its playeas are 
not in accord to the A. E. A. strike 
call and it is a play, which may be 
given without stage hands. "Green- ' 
wicfi Village follies" is the sole music- 
al revue left and it is remaining down- 
town in the village to escape any en- 
tanglements with the great puzzle of 
Times square. The only other ex- 
ception to Broadway's era of showless 
legitimate attractions is "Happy Days," . 
the Hippodrome spectacle, which got 
off to an unopposed start last Saturday 
and is looked on as one of the best of 
Hip attractions. 

In the meanwhile the vaudeville sea- 
son is officially on next week, the few 
houses closed during the summer re- 
opening. It is no secret that vaude- 
ville is cleaning up and will continue 
to flourish exceptionally well while 
the lock is on the Square. Classed 
with vaudeville is the benefit show at 
the Lexington, given by the A. E. A. 
It did $36,000 last week and will re- 
peat this week. The Winter Garden 
attempted to continue against the 
strike with a varied vaudeville offering 
but finally went dark Sunday. 

The most spectacular closings since 



SHOWS IN NEW YORK AND C0MMEN1 



"A Rea-nlar Feller." Is In the aame fix 
as all but tour out of over 30 Broad- 
way attractions stopped dead by the 
actors' Strike. Thia piece, however, 
has not yet attained a New York pre- 
miere. 

"A Lonely Romeo/' Casino. Stopped last 
Saturday (Aug. 23) after the audience 
had filed In, by walkout of stagehands 
and musicians. Had been classed as 
an exempt show. Strike called be- 
cause of yShubert's interest In it and 
house. Completed 11th week. Hay 
not resume on Broadway. 

"A voice la the Dark," Republic Elec- 
tric signs continue to advertise this 
mystery play which looked like a win- 
ner. No nearer opening: than the 
others. Strike stopped it Aug-. 7 in 
second week. 

"At 0.48," Playhouse (ffth week). Is one 
of the rarest things, a Broadway show 
still running. Was closed for a week 

• by strike, but W. A. Brady continues 
it. Can be given without stage crew, 
which may be why I. A. T. 8. E, has 
not called out its men here. 

"Midnight Century -whirl." The Century 
Root attraction was to have stopped 
this week even If the strike had not 
halted it (Aug. 16). A new show was 
to have been given. No plans for the 
roof theatre yet 

"Crimson Alibi,'* Broadhurat One ot 
the mystery plays which may be re- 
opened after strike muddle Is dissi- 
pated. Was stopped (Aug. 7) in Its 
fourth week. 

"Follies," Amsterdam. Was In its 9th 
week when stopped on Aug. 18. Condi- 
tions on Broadway are so puzzling as, 
to possibilities that the Zlegfeld may 
reopen after the strike instead of pick- - 
ing up its road time. 

"Five Minion," Lyric. Was closed Aug. 7, 
and no resumption attempted. Should 
have a chance to continue when strike 
Is bc tiled 

"Gaieties of 1910," 44th Street. Was 
closed down finally on Aug. 9 after an 
effort to reopen with a punctured cast « 
Its resumption in New York not looked' 
for. Played five weeks. Pictures are 
showing at the 44th Street 

"Bast Is West," Astor. Stopped Aug. 7 
by strike. Reopened Aug. 16, playing 
one night and going dark by stage- 
hands walking. Played 48 weeks. . 

"Greenwich viilsse Follies," Greenwich 
Village Theatre (7th week). Lvthe 
only musical show in New York. Pro- 
ducers not In managers' association 
and show will not risk strike call by 
moving Into a P. M. A. house in Times 
Square. Playing to capacity except 
Wednesday matinees. 

"John Ferguson," Fulton (16th week). 
This attraction and "At 9.45" the only 
plays on Broadway open. At that. Is 
not now playing to big business. 

"Listen Lester/' Knickerbocker. Stopped 

by strike Aug. 7. Reopened Aug. 11th 

and ran to Aug. 16, shutting down with , 

-stagehands' exit. Played 86 weeks. 

Will not again open here. Is on tour. 

"LlghtnlnV Gaiety. Strike closed this 

• show Aug. 7 in its 61st week. No 
chance of reopening until situation is 
cleared. 

last week were' those of "Scandals of 
1919" ' at the Liberty, and Fields' "A 
Lonely Romeo" at the Casino. Both 
had been exempted by the A. E. A but 
a sudden change of heart sent them 
into the yawning closed column. Their 
demise left the theatrical district with- 
out any musical attraction other than 
the Hippodrome spectacle. 



"La La i.ncme," Miller (14th week). 
Was closed Aug. .19 by strike. Will 
ndt reopen here and was due to atop 
this week anyhow. 

"Monte cri»to, Jr.," Winter Garden. 
Show was knocked apart at the start 
of the strike. Played vaudeville and 
ensemble numbers until Sunday last 
(Aug. 24). House now dark. 

"Nightie Night," Princess. Premiere 
was due Aug. 7, the strike night It 
will likely be the Princess' first attrac- 
tion when a settlement is reached, 

"Oh What a Girl," Shubert Was otoppod 
with the original group Aug. 7 and . 
will not reopen here. Gallo En, >"" 
Opera Co. announced for next Mond. 
Assumed to be an exempt offerin 
though that is not certain. 

"Royal Vagabond," Cohen and Harris, 
Was closed on Aug. 7, reopened with 
George M. Cohan, Aug. 8, running until 
Aug. 16, when house went dark by 
stagehandB walking. , 

"She Would and she Did," Vanderbllt 
Grace George was to have debuted with 

. this piece during the week of Aug. 
lltb, out never opened. :-':• 

"She'* a Good Fellow," Globe. Stopped 
- by walkout, Aug. 9, on laot day ofits 
14th week. Will not reopen here. 
Thurston, magician, advertised to open 
Monday, failed to do so. . Informed 
stagehands were out 

"Scandals of 1019," Liberty: Was 
exempted until Saturday last (Aug. 
23), when house was shut through, 
dual action ot A. E. A. and stagehands. 
Explanation was that house belonged 
to a. L. Erianger. White not in man- 
agers' association. 

"88 Bast," Maxlne Elliott. Was closed 
by strike Aug. 18, explanation being 
that the fahuberts were Interested. 
Will not reopen here. 

"Those Who Walk in Darkness," 48th 
Street. Opened Aug. 14, but ran only 
three days, stagehands going out after 
performance, Aug. 16. 

"The Better »Ole," Booth (46th week). 
Called out by strike Aug. 7, but con- 
tinued to run until Aug. 21, stage- 
hands walking on that date. Probably 
not to open here again. 

"The Challenge," Selwyn. Closed Aug. 7; 
reopened Aug. 8, but was closed down 
by stagehands walking Aug. 16. Will 
reopen when strike is over. (1*' 

"Cha Chin Chow," Century. Played nine 
days in spite ot strike call which 
stopped it Aug. 16. Was to have 
opened on the road this week In To- 
ronto. Stagehands who walked were 
road crew and show cannot move. 

Zlegfeld Nine O'clock and Mldnlsht 
Shows. Closed down through action 
of stagehands Aug. 18. 

"Adam snd Eva." Another new show 
which never won a premiere because 
of strike, 

"Happy Days," Hippodrome. Opened last 
Saturday, getting a great set of no- 
tices. Regarded as one of the strong- 
est Hip offerings. Appears to So 
classed as an exempt production. With 
the number of Broadway attractions 
almost at zero, Hip has fine chance of 
getting off to a record-breaking start 



a&3£ 



SHOWS IN LOS ANGELES. 

Los' Angeles, Aug. 27. 
At the local houses the Orpheum, 
vaudeville, continues to draw strongly. 
"Civilian Clothes" at the Morosco is 
in its ninth week. 



42, 



New Acts and Shows on pages 41 a 



m 




1 



Brandon Tynan with "the mob" composed of 



EQUITY'S MOB SCENE 

members of the Actors' Equity Association, at the A. E. A. show, now at the Lexington Theatre; 
New York. ^^ 



f 



■<J"':di& 








VARI 



-■'- 



.1 . ■ 



.*£Sft£hwu r'.i-. J '■', >'■- -. >.fWTiF' a^J*rwft^ 



S££^*rr*^^ ..-^J '■■■■■ 



M NEXT WEEK (SEPT. 1) 

, la Vaudeville Theatres 

(All houses open for the week with Monday matinee, when not otherwise indicated.) 

The bills below are grouped In divisions, according to the booking offices they are supplied 

The manner in which these bills are printed does not denote the relative Importance of 
nets nor their program position!. 

* Before name Indicates act is now doing new turn, or reappearing after absence from 
vaudeville, or appearing in city where listed for the first time. 



B. F. KEITH 

Palace Theatre Building-, N«w York City 



NEW YORK CITY 
Keita*» palace 

Chas King & Girl 
•"Runaway Girl" 
Ted Lewis & Band 
Gallagher & Roiley 
Brgndel & Burt 
•"TTt*i & Tucker 
' ation Diamond Co 
> r elth's Alhambra 
y (Opening week) 
j Alfred Farrell Co 

■ Stanley & Blrnes 
Arthur Havel Co 
Henry Lewis 
Gus Edwards Co 
3 Rubes 
Barr Twins 
Rooney & Bent 

Keith's Colonial 
(Opening week) 
Gonsler & Lusby 
Kranz A La Salle 
De Wolf Girls 
Mobs & Frye 
Nonette 

Clifton Crawford 
"Magic Glasses" 
• Wheaton & Carroll 
Dennis Bros 
i Keith's Riverside 
: Breen Family 
r Kerr & Weston 

■ Jazzland Naval 8 
Klein Bros 
Howard & Clark 
Clark & Bergman 

ifeji-i^DaviB & Darnell 
Mile Nlta Jo 
Catherine Powell 
Keith's Royal 
Camilla's Birds 
Columbia & Victor 
Alice Hamilton 
Whoaton & Carroll 
Slssell & Blake • 
Lee Kohlmar Co 
Henry Lewis 
(One to fill) 
Keith'* H. O. H. 
2d half (28-31) 
The Braminos 
i ' . Wheeler ft Potter 
W$ J & A Garrison 
l , 4 Harmony Kings 
I lit half (1-8) 

;' [^Arthur Hill 
j If: Jackson Hlnes Co 
Saxton & Farrell 
F Stafford Co 
Jimmy Lucas Co 
I I'l Flllis Family 






I 
! 



I 









2d half (4-7) 
•Earl Rleard 
Lillian Kinsbury 
J C Mack Co 
(Others to fill) < 
Praetor's 125th St. 
2d half (28-81), 
■ t Bluebird 8 

- Miss Parker 
•> S & M Hughes . 
.. (Others to fill) 
y:r 7 m. half (1-8) 
Earl Rleard 
Mrs Eva Fay 
(Others to fill) 

2d half (4-7) 
Anthony 
•J & A Garrison 
Mra.Eva Fay 
' f rr»y Lucas Co 
"Vo to All) 
iKfelth'a Slat St. 
tvt Earl Co 
♦jsttl & Moore 
Jlen Gleason Co 
'<'■ toes & Winthrop 
J' A Shayne 
i'v Mile Shaw Rev 
: /Two to fill) 
«v' /Proctor's B8th St. 
\ UA Cliffords 
.^Arlington & Trone 
jNp & M Nolan 
\ i ,*Renn & Cunningham 

Maxwell 6 
' J Mack & Earl 
(Scamp ft Scamp 
) 2d halt 

J\ I Dance Review 
i Tom McRae Co 
H Harrington Co 
Bill Dooley 
Frank Conroy Co 
Gonne & Alberts 
Praetor'*' 5th At. 
2d half (28-81) 
M & M Dunn 
Lee Kohlman Co 
b *2 Du For Boys 
^ew Dockstader 
J C Mack Co 
/•Ed Janls & Girl 
/ 1st half (1-8) 
Anthony 



I 



U J C Mack Co 
i'J AUeen Stanley 
I J & M Harkins 
ii( Robins Co _ 
!)[ 2d half (4-7) 
ffii Cliffords 



Barry Girls 
Walters & Walters! 
Rudlnoff 
•F Stafford Co 
Proctor* 28* St. 
2d half (28-31) 
•La Seville Lenora Co 
M a J Dove 
Ellis ft Irwin 
•"Playmates" 
•Lola Girlie Co 
(Two to All) 

1st half (1-3) 
Alex Sparks Co 
Dotson 

•J & A Garrison 
Blllle Seaton Co 
Buch Bros 
(Two to fill) 

2d half (4-7) 
Suzanne ft Ernest 
M Montgomery 
Brooks ft George 
(Three to fill) 
CONEY ISLAND 
Brighton 
N & M Brltton 
Gygl ft Vadle 
Burns & Frablto 
Nan Halperln 
Ferry 
(Three to fill) 

Henderson's 
Flying Henrys | 
Raymond & S 
•Berk & Valda 
Lazar ft Dale . > ,\ 
Whiting ft Burt 
Montgomery & A 
"Modern Mirage" 
(Two to fill) 

BROOKLYN 

Keith's liu.hwlek 
Fred & Albert 
2 Jesters 
Hackett ft Dchnar 
Jack Inglls 
Hermlne Shone Co 
Creole Fashion Plate 
Sinclair & GaBper 
Texas Comedy 4 
Mme Herman 

Keith's Orpheusa 
Plerlot & Soofield 
Frank Crumlt 
Meyers & Noon 
Olsen & Johnson 
Frisco , 
Julia Kelety 
Langford A Fredericks 
Mosconl Bros 
Ruth Budd 
Keith's) Greeapolnt 

2d half (28-81) 
Stuart ft wood 
El Cleve 
Larry Rellly Co 
(Others to fill) 

1st half (1-3) 
Barbette 

M Montgomery Co 
Faber Bros 
(Three to nil) 

2d half (4-7) 
T & K O'Meara 
(Others to fill) 
Keith's Prospect 

2d half (28-81) 
Barbette 

Clinton & Rooney 
"The Decorators" 
Bowman Bros 
(Others to All) 

1st half (1-8) 
M & M Dunn 
Walters & Walters 
Moran ft Hack 

Halsey 
York's Dogs 
Mardo ft Hunter 
The Plasterers 
Jacques & Day 
Smith ft Kaufman 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
De Lyte Girls 
Hazel Davenport Co 
Evans & Wilson 
Phil Davis 

ALBANY, N. Y. 
Proctor's 
(Troy Split) 
1st half 
Samsted & Marlon 
Taber & Green 
Regal & Mack 
Vlnle Daly Co 
Primrose 4 
Chas Ahearn Tr 

ALLENTOAVN, PA. 
Orphenm 

2 Earls 

Pvt. Bob Randall 
E & E Adair 
Coaola & Verdi 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
Clark & Favere 
Emmntt Devoy Co 
Frand Gabby 
(Two to fill) 



|Pheis: Bqnurt 7«38 _ 

CHIYO AND CHIYO 

Of CHIYO KA8UYA 4s CO. 

Now tailing pure Japanest Silks. Posses, by the yard; 
Itlao Silk Embroidered Kimono*, Cfclnaware, etc 
SPECIAL ITUCE FOB PBOraSaiON 



Hobby Van Horn 
Dowson Bis ft S 
"Going Some" 
Hallen ft Hunter 
The Magleya 
GRAND RAPIDS 
Empress 

3 Nitos 

J ft W Hennlng 
Rae E Ball & Bro 

4 Roses 
(Others to nil) 

HAMILTON 
Lysis 
F ft E Carmen 
Miller ft Bradford 
Mary Howard Co 
Pietro 

Wayne ft Warrens 
Wlnstons Lions 



Put nam Bldg.. 8<ilt« 428, I4»3 Broadway, New Vara City HAHKISBURG, PA. 

' Majestic 

CHARLESTON, S G 

Victory 

(Columbia Split) 
1st half 
Novelty Clintons 
Florence Millette 
Thos Jackson Co 
Hawthorne ft Cook 
Juno Sauna 



ATLANTA 
Lyrie 

[(Birmingham split) 
I 1st halt 

' Permane & Shelly 
LEd Marshall 
1 John P Gordon Co 
i Eleanor Cochran 
£ "Melody Maids" 
ATLANTIC CITY 
B, F. Keith's 
' De Wolf Girls 
Dickinson ft D'gon 
01 ga Petrova 
Bert Fitsglbbon 
(Others to till) 

Globe 
Emma Fra Belle Co 
Francis OverhoHt 
Bryan ft Broderiok 
Geo Rosner 
Dickinson ft Deagon 
•Mimic World" 
auiiukn, N. Y. 
Jefferson 
Jackie ft Blllle 
Marlon Weeks 
(Two to mi) 
2d half 
-Hamlin ft Mack 
(Three to fill) 
BALTIMORE 
Maryland 
Wellington's Surp'e 
Walter Brower 
Lillian Fitzgerald 
"Glee Club" 
Kellum ft O'Dare 
Mme Rhea Reo 
Herbert's DogB 
(Two to All) 
BINGHAMPTON 
Stone 
Saxon ft Moore 
Huber Dyer Co 
(One to mil 
2d halt 
Viola May Co 
McAvo- ft Wilson 
Kelso ft Lelghton 



CHARLESTON, N O 

Academy 
(Roanoke Split) 
let half 
Walter Lwyes 
Elm City 4 
Billy Hart Co 
(Two to fill) 



'O^w 



CHATTANOOGA 
Rlalto 

(Knoxville Split) 

1st half 
Elllnda Tiffany 
Ollmore ft Castle 
Grew ft Pates 
Chas Wilson 
S Eddys 

CHESTER, PA. 

Adcesaent 
Dancing Darians 
Sully & Houghton 
Nat S Jerome Co 
Bowman Bros 
Beauty Vender 

2d half 
"Girl in Frame" 
Keegan ft Edwards 
"The Cat" 
Page ft Gray 
"The Decorators" 
CLEVELAND 

Hippodrome 
Margot Francois Co 
Shaw ft Campbell 
Jane Courthope Co 
Adolphus Co 
Yates ft Reed 
7 Glasgow Maids 
(One to fill) 



IMIMNfi oftpflKN clMuW 

MADGE MAITLAND 



With "THE MEGAPHONE WALLOP" 



BIRMINGHAM 
Lyrle 

(Atlanta split) 
1st half 
The Demacos 
Diana Bonner 
Harry Oakes Co 
T Moore ft Girls 
The RandallB 
BOSTON 

B. F. Keith's 
Dancing Kennedys 
Duval & Symonds 
Diane ft Rubinl 
Geo Jessel 
Melnotte ft Leedum 
"Kiss Me" 
Ryan ft Healy 
Rtnaldo Bros 
BUFFALO 
Shea's 
Paul La Var Qo 
Wallace Galvtn 
Lydla McMillan 
Diamond & Bren'n 
Ford ft Urma 
Joe Browning 
Bardoni ft Rice 
Wilson ft Larson 

OAMDBN, N. J. 
Towers 

"Girl in Frame" 
Keegan & Edwards 
"The Cat- 
Page ft Gray 
"The Decorators' 

2d half 
Nip ft O'Brien 
Sully ft Houghton 
The. Financiers 
Bowman Bros 
Beauty Vender 
CANTON, O. 
Lyceum 
Challon ft Keke 
Weston ft Elme 
Macart & Bradford 
Sherman Van ft H 
Jovedah De Rajah 
(Two to All) 



COLUMBIA, 8. C. 

Columbia 
(Charleston Split) 

1st half 
Prank Carter 
Carle ft Inez 
McCormack ft M 
Lillian Herleln Co 
3 Gordons 

COLUMBUS, O. 
b. F. Keith's 

Dare Bros 
Kmmett Ryan Co 
Lew Hawkins 
Eddie Carr Co 
Alia Moskova Co 
Juggling Nelson 

DETROIT 

Temple 
Sallie Fisher Co 
Jason & Haig 
Conlin ft Glass 
Sidney Phillips 
The Briants 
Leon Varvara \ ' 
Brown Sis 
Potter ft Hartwell 

BABTON. PA. 
Able O. H. 

Frank Gabby • 
Emmett Devoy Co 
Jas Thompson Co 
(Two to All) 

2d half 
2 Earls 

Pvt. Bob Randall 
Coscla ft Ferdl 
Juvenile Follies 
ELMIRA, N. Y. 
Majestic 
Viola May 
Eric Yardo 
Hendrlx B Isle Co 

2d half 
Bolger Bros 
Henry ft Moore 
Callahan Bros 

BRIE, PA. 
Colonial 
Davis ft Pelle 



DR. J. BIER, PHYSICIAN 

RMS) 2*8, PStSBB BslUIll 

ltMBrssdwsy NEW YORK CITY 



Winkle & Dean 
Dobbs ft Welsh 
J R Johnson Co 
(Two to nil) 
2d half 
Anderson & Yoel 
Anderson ft Burl 
Jas Thompson Co 
(Two to fill) 

ITHACA. N. Y. 

Star 
Bolger Bros 
Henry ft Moore 

2d half 
Eric Yardo 
"Love of Mike" 
JACKSONVILLE 

Arcade 
(Savannah Split) 

1st half 
HedleyS 
Artie Hall 
Day & Neville 
Holliday ft W'lette 
Columbia 6 

JERSEY CITY 
B. F. KeltVs 
2d half (2S-30) 
Great Weston 
Green ft La Fell 
Leonard ft Whitney 
M ft A Clark 
Buch Bros 

1st half (1-8) 
Norman 

L Kingsbury Co 
T A K O'Meara 
(Others to All) 

2d half (4-6) 
Faber Bros 
Clinton ft Rooney 
Billy Elliott 
"Playmates" 
JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Majestic 
(Pittsburgh Split) 
1st half 
Asaki ft Girlie 
Fred Elliott 
Wheeler ft Potter 
Stars in Toyland 
(One to nil) 
KNOXVILLE 
Bijou 
(Chattanooga 8p) 

1st halt 
John Small ft Sis 
Bandy ft Fields 
Mr ft Mrs G Wilde 
Swor Bros 
De Peron 8 

LANCASTER, PA. 

Colonial 

Anderson ft Yvel 

Rottlna ft Barrett 
Fenton ft Fields 

2d half 
Bud ft Moyer Sl6 
MoNally Dimes ft D 
Dobbs ft Welch 
Tamakl Duo 

LOUI8VILLB 
B. F. Kelth'n 
Albert Donnelly 
Swor ft Westbrook 
"Love in Suburbs- 
Rector Weber & L 
Atlioa ft Reed 
2d half 
Swain's Animals 
Margaret Nord 
Business Proposal 
Ellis ftlrwin 
Duprez ft Duprez 
LOWELL 
B. F. Keith'. 
Florenz Duo 
Sautl ft Tobln 
6 Princeton Girls 
Foley ft O'Neil 
Taylor Gratton Co 
Emily Darrell 
Canton 8 

MANCHESTER 
N. H. 
Palsce 
Tozart 

Hooper ft B'hardt 
Bert Baker Co 
Margaret Padula 
31ack ft White 

2d half 
Ford ft Hewitt 
El Coda 
Ed Herron Co 
Walsh ft Edwards 
Daree Celebrities 
MOBILB, ALA. 
Lyrle 
(New Orleans split) 

1st half 
Levering Duo 



Alice Manning 
Devoy ft Dayton 
Adler ft Dunbar 
Emma Francis Co ' 

MONTREAL 
Princess 
Claire ft Atwood 
Mason & Gwynn 
SampBel ft Leonhart 
"Man Hunt" 
Dot Brenner 
Marx Bros - 
Geo A Moore 
Adelaide Belle Co 

MT. VERNON 
2d half (28-80) 
Arthur Hill 
Otto ft Sheridan 
The Lelghtons 
MoLallan ft Carson 
Belle Baker i 

Sylvia Loyal Co 
NEWARK, N. J. 

Proetor'o' 
2d halt (28-30) 
Hope Vernon 
Stanley & Blrnes 
Regal ft Moors 
(Others to All) 

1st half (1-8) 
Burns Bros 
Clinton & Rooney 
Rainbow Cocktail 
'Rogers ft Lum 
Rudlnoff 
Jenny Hussy Co 
Miller ft Francis , 

2d half (4-6) 
Arthur Hill 
Aileen Stanley Co 
Billy Gaxton Co 
Milt Collins 
Jenny Hussy Co 
NEW ORLEANS 
Palace 

(Mobile split) 
1st half 
Bollinger ft Reyn'ds 
Howard Llssette Co 
Meanest Man 
Chung Wha ,4 
Pot Pourrl 

NEWPORT NEWS, 
VA. 

Olympic 
(Petersburg Split) 

1st half 
The Reniettas 
Lehr Edmunds ft M 
Van Sheldon Co 
Cahlll & Romano 
Joma ft Hawailans 
NORFOLK, VA. 

Aeadessy 
(Richmond Split) 
1st naif . 
The PelotS 
Jean Barrios 
Percy Pollock 
Murray Sis 
Welch Mealy ft M 
OTTAWA 
Dosslnlon 
Annette & Morrell 
Hallen ft Fuller 
"Indoor Sports" 
Lelghtons - 
Norden Bros 
PETERSBURG, VA 

Century 
(Newport News Sp) 

' 1st half 
The Keeleys 
University 3 
Mudge Morton 3 
Spencer ft Hand 
Adonis ft Dor 
PHILADELPHIA 
Allegheny 
Peterson Bros 
Meredith ft Bnooser 
Jas C Morton Co 
U S Carols 8 
Wyatt's Lassies 

Gerard 
Elkln's Birds 
Chas Boyden 
Nip ft O'Brien 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
Dancing Dorians 
Hoyt Duffy 3 
Roattina & Barrett 
Winkle ft Dean 

Grand 
Rekoma 

Worth Waiting 4 
Powers & Wallace 
"Melody of Youth 1 ' 
Fallon ft Brown 
Torelli'a Circus 
Keystone 
Lt Girard 

"Lets Get Married" 
Alexandria 
Al White Revue 
(One to nil) 

Wns Penn 
Green Miller ft G 
"The Financiers" 
Glenn & Jenkins 
McNally Dinus ft J 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
Elkln's Birds 
Fenton ft Fields 
Mack Bennett Girls 
(One to nil) 
PITTSBURGH 
Davis J 

Holmes ft Wells 
4 Bangards 
Old Time Darkles 
Margaret Young 
Stan Stanley 8 
(Others to fill) 



TjFNTI^T dr. m. g. cary 

iyXul-% 3 lO A MoVMlSI** Theatre. Bids. 

Special Rates to tte 
Professten 



CtilCAGO 



HarrI* 

Kelso ft Blair 
Stewart ft Neff 
Flo Randall Co 
Sullivan ft Myers 
Francis Scott Co 
(Others to nil) 

Sheridan So. 
(Johnstown Split) 

1st half 
Walman & Barry 
"Manilla Bay" 
Fiddler ft Stevens 
(Two to HID 
PORTLAND ME. 
B. F. Keith's 
Jim Jazz King 
Mildred Valmore 
Herman ft Shirley 
SylveBter ft Vance 
Chas Grapewin Co 
V ft E Stanton 
READING, PA. 

Rlppodrotne 
Clark ft Lavere 
Reynolds ft White 
Bobbe ft Nelson 
Juvenile Follies 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
B & B Conrad 
McCormick ft W. 
(Three to nil) 

RICHMOND 

Lyrle 

(Norfolk Split) 

1st half 
Wilson Aubrey 3 
Gertrude Van Dyke 
"Cranberries" 
Mullen ft Corrclll 
Syncopated Step'rs 

ROANOKH 
Roanoke 

(Charlotte Split) 
1st half 
Norma Talma 
Marie Stoddard 
"S'where France" 
Cooper ft Rlcardo 
Amoros Sis 

ROCHESTER 
Temple 

(Opening Week) 
Mason & Keeler 
Elmore & Williams 
JAS Leonard Co 
Ann Gray 
Jack Lavere 



Eadie & Rarauden 
Larry Comer 
Imhoff Conn ft C 
Albright ft Dietrich 
Emma Carus Co 
Prosper ft Maret 
TORONTO 
Shea's 
Delano ft Pike 
Transfleld Sis 
Whipple Huston Co 
Mlrano ft Maley 
Marmein Sis ft S 
Joe Towle 
Donald Sis 

Shea's His 
E J Moore \ 

Owen McGiveney 
Laurel Lee 
(Others to nil), 
TRENTON, N. J. 

Taylor O. H. 
Bud ft Moyer Sia 
Sidney Townes • ' 
Mary Maxfteld Co 
Silvers ft Berger 
Tamakl Duo 

2d half 
Rodero 

Nat Jerome Co 
Green Miller ft O 
TROY, N. Y. 

Proctor's 
(Albany SpUt) 
1st half 
Valentine ft Bell 
3 Kings 
"Memories" 
McCarty & Foye 
Wilson Bros 
Kirksmith Sis 
UNION HILL, N. J. 
Lincoln 

B ft E Matthews 
De Lyte Girls 
Hoyt Duffy 3 
Phil Davis 
Cairo 

2d half 
Doranto 

Mardo ft Hunter 
'Night in Trenches' 
Sid Townes 
Mabel Morgan Co 
UTIOA 
Colonial 
E Wayne Beeman 
Hamlin ft Mack 
McAvoy ft WilBon 



:■■■- 



$14 



PER 
WEEK 



ROOM FOR BA 



TWO 



5 MIllttM from All Theatre. 
..Ovwlooyni Ontral Par* 

$16Vek r SUITES perVohs 

Conetitlrm of Parlor. Bedroom and Blth 
Light, Airy, with All ImprovHaiot* 

REISENWEBER'S HOTEL 

58ft Street tod Columbus Circle 
New York City 



Finley ft Hill 
Emerson ft Bidwln 
Margaret Stewart 

SAVANNAH 

Bijou 

(Jacksonville Split) 

1st half 
Gualano ft Marg'te 
Leroy ft M Hart 
Arthur Finn Co 
Murray Bennett 
Arco Bros 
SCHENECTADY 
Proctor's 
May Gardner 
Carmen's Minstrels 
"Ideal" 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Bartholdl's Birds 
Althoff Sis 
"Ragged Edge" 
Peck & Mclntyre 
"Ideal" 

SYRACUSE 
Orescent 
Callahan Bros 
KelBo ft Lelghton 
"Love of Mike" 
(Three to fill) 

2d half 
Saxon ft Mohr 
Hubert Dyer Co 
(Four to fill) 
Temple 
Bartholdl's Birds 
Althoff Sia 
"Ragged Edge" 
Peck ft Mclntyre 
Fresco tts ft H Eden 

2d half 
Carmen's Minstrels 
FrescottB ft H Eden 
(Three to fill) 
TOLEDO 
B. F. Keith's 
Chick ft Chlcklets 



Craig ft Steiger 

2d half 
Jackie ft Billy 
Marlon Weeks 
Coalkley ft Dunlevy 
Bosch Bros 

WASHINGTON, 
D. C. 
B. F. Keith's. 
M ft J Dunedln 
Masters ft Kraft 
"5.000 A Year" 
Lew Dockstader 
MUlerBBhlp ft Gor'd 
Craig ft Campbell 
Dooley ft 'Sales 
Asahl Troupe 
WILMINGTON 
. Garrick 
(Opening Week) 
Jack Hanley. 
Laurie ft Prince 
4 Buttercups 
Valerie Bergere Co 
Buryell ft Parker 
Larry Rellly Co 
Morgan ft Anger 
Flying Keelera 
YONKERS, N. Y. 
. Proctor's 
Piqua ft Fellows 
Bill Dooley 
Mellette SiBtors 
Allman ft Mails 
Jarrow 
Tates Fishing 
2d half 
P ft M Nolan 
Dotson 

Renn ft Cunn'gham 
Mack ft Earl 
Alex Suarks Co 
YORK. PA. 
Opera House 
Evans ft Wilson 
E ft B Conrad 
McCormick ft W 



DR, JULIAN SIEGEL 

Official Dentist to the N. V. A. 

1406 Broadway (Patient BullcTee). New Ysrk 



.'^.v.r-'j- •■ ••-.'■. •";•■;; "■■■ ' ■ m i ERSpan ■■■■••;■'.■■ ■■ ■ ■ ..• ■■■■■ :•',$** ■.-'■■•'■•v.-f. WW&M )>'--■ ■" M ^ -■>•->"? 

,-. : -t ;■ .':' ■ : . ■■ ' ' "' ■ • ' ■ ■; } : '-."-r. ■ ■'• '■■'.■'■■'-•'■ ■' ■. ' ; ■'■■■:"'.: ■'. •:"." ■■' C ' ;. •.'. .-.■•.■ ', .";.. . v. • .■'••» v : '■•",-: ""."• -.■■•' ."..,-, ■$• .■: i -?i 

VARIETY ■ ., "/ :;.V' ', 

: ; ' » i ii n" i « i i ■ ■ n iMii n w w w i m. i i 'i iiiii ' i ■ h i - i i i m i ■ i ■ 



■m 



Reynold* ft Whit* 
Bobbe ft Nelson 
J Johnson Co 

lOUNOSTOWN, 0. 
{ Hippodrome 

Jordan airls 



Phlna A Phlcks 
Hugh Herbert Co 
Olga Tawags Co 
Mat Nazarro Co 
Allan Bogera 
B Bauncer Co 
(One to nil) 



Poll Circuit 



BRIDGEPORT 

Poll'. 
Chadwlck & Taylor 
Q Dudley Co 
Torraye ft George 
I 2d halt 
W ft B Dwyer . 
Holmes ft Lavere 
Mayo & Irwin . 
Rose ft Moon 
Plain 
The Forbes 
Mallally McC Co 
Patrick ft Otto 
College 6 

3d half 
Garry Owen 
Revue Comedy 4 
i La Toy's Models 
HARTFORD 

Pnlaee 
Tasettl & Bennett 
The Valentin* 
Mayo ft Irwin 
4 Meyakos . . 

2d half 
Jolly J Jones Co 
Lewis ft Black 
T Wilbur Co 
Bevan ft Flint 
G Eastman Co 
, If BW HAVE!* 

Hljoa 

L ft B Dwyer 
Garry Owen 
G Bhipman Co 
Rovue Comedy 4 
La Toys ModelB 

2d half 
Torraye ft George 
Mallally McC Co 
Ferns ft Lltt 
The Corinthians 

Palace 
Holmes ft Lavere 
Hendricks ft Stone 
G Eastman Co 

2d half 
Ramsdell ft Deya 
Patrick ft Otto 
"Only Girl" 

SCRANTON 

Pol|> 

(WUkes-Barre sp) 

1st half 
Morlln 
B ft B Ross . 



"Roaetlme" ^ 
Ward & Van 
D'Amore ft Doug 
SPRINGFIELD 
Palace 
Turner ft Grace 
Lewis ft Black 
T Wilbur Co 
W Virginia ft W 
The Corinthians 

2d half 
Tosettl ft Bennett 
Joe Sherman 
G Dudley Co 
4 Pals 
"4 Meyakos 

WATERBURY 
Pell'* 
Jolly J Jones Co 
Joe Sherman 
W Sweatman Co 
Bevan & Flint 
Rose ft Moon 

2d half 
"3 Friends" 
The Valentine 
W Virginia ft W 
Hart ft Helena 
WILKES-BARRB 

Poll's) 
(Scranton split) 

1st half 
Clayton & Clayton 
Oreen & La Fell 
"Everysailor" 
Dave Roth 
4 Aaron s 

WORCESTER 
Poll', 
Hart ft Helens 
"4 Pals" 
(Others to nil) 

2d half 
McMahon Sia 
Cectle Eldrld ft C 
Traoey ft Wahl 
W Sweatman Co 

Plan 
8 Friends 
Ferns ft Lltt 
Ramsdell ft Doyo 

2d half 
Turner ft Graoe 
Chadwlck & Taylor 
Brother Elk 
Hendrlck & Stone 
College 6 



CHICAGO B.F.KEITH 

Vaadevllla Exchange ' 
Chicago 
BATTLE CREEK. Bond Wilson 
BUon 



Co 



2 Carltons 
Anna Francis. 

Purke ft English 
earson 8 
2d half 
The Ander Sisters 
Villa ft Fred Royce 
Ted McLean Co 

Shree Chums 
tta Mario Co 
BAY CITY 
IHJou 
F ft P Norman 
Hlnkel ft May 
Ted McLean Co 
Dale ft Boyle - 
o 2d halt 

Sialto ft Lamont 
ave & Lillian 
Geo P Randall 
Mabel Harper Co 
"Miniature Revue" 

FLINT. 
• "V Palace 
The Mcln tyres, _• 
Willing Bent ft W 
Arthur Jennings Co 
Lew Wilson ■ 
Rita Mario Co 
, 2d half 
J ft J Burns 
Homer Dubard 
A Edwards Co 
♦"The Intruder" 
Gypsey Reveu 
FT. WAYNE. 
Palace 
Musical Geralds 
Edmunds ft Rogers 
»2 Sweethearts 
Eugene Troupe 
(Two to nil) 

2d half 
Burke Bros & K 
Gibson ft Betty : 
Rising Generation* 
Burkhardt ft R 
8 Ankers 

JACKSON. 
Orphenm 
J ft J Burns 



3 Chums 

Geo Kalaluhls Co 

(One to fill) 
2d half 

F ft D Norman 
Blllle ft Dot t 
•"Help Wanted" 
Pearson Trio 
LAFAYETTE. 
Family 
Dawn June Co 
Adams Trio 
Kammerer ft H 
"Who Ie He" 
•"Rolling Along" 

LANSING. 
BIJon 

W Gilbert Co 
Mabel Harper Co 
A Edwards Co 
•"The Intruder" 
"Miniature Revue" 

2d half 
2 Carltons 
Rose & Thorn ■ - 
Bond Wilson Co 
Geo Kalaluhla Co 
(One to fill) 

LOGANSPORT 
Colonial 

2d half 
McNutt ft Evelyn 
Anna Francis 
Frtsch Howard ft T 
OWOSSO, MICH. 

Strand 
Arthur Lavlne Co 
Billy Kelgarde 
Nelson & Barry 
SAGINAW. 
Jet. Strand 
Rlalto & Lamont 
Homer & Dunbard 
Geo P Randall Co 
Gypsey Revue 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
The Mclntyres • 
Arthur Jennings Co 
Lew Wilson 
Willis Gilbert Co 



BOSTON B. F. KEITH. 

, Vaudeville Exchange 
Boston 



AMHERST, N. S. 
Empress - ■ 

The Hazel tona 
Louise Vernon 
Bailey Comedy 
Gordon & Le Mar 
Chief Tendahoe . 



BATH, ME. 
Opera House 

B ft I Taalek 
Gordon Duo ■ 
Phontos 

2d half 
Chief Tendahoe 



Gordon & La Mar 
Varr ft Tunis 
BOSTON 

Boston 
Felix ft Fisher 
McDermott A Heagney 
Concert Revue 
Copes ft Hutton 
Ara Sisters 

BROCKTON 

Strand 
Martini & Fabrinl 
Peggy Vincent 
Traoey ft Wahl 
Allen ft Lyman m 
Johnson Baker ft J 

2d half 
Lee Stoddard 
4 Woodrow Girls 
Toiart 

Plstel A Cashing 
Esther Trio 
. CAMBRIDGE 
Gordon's Central Sq 
Cesakl & Takl 
Jessie Haywood Co 
Chas Seamon 
Ford ft Cunnlngh'm 
Ray ft Arthur 
, 2d half 
Eskimo ft Seals 
Bernard ft Merrltt 
McDermott 
Martin & Webb 
"The Miracle" 
DORCHESTER 
Franklin Park 
Ford ft Hewitt 
El Cota 

4 Woodrow Girls v 
Plstel ft dishing 

2d half 
Mystic Hanson 8 
Peggy Vincent 
Marguerite Padula 
Black A White 
HALIFAX. N S 

Ackers 

(6-12> 
Toots A Pal 
Murray ft Irwin 
Cowan & Lewis 
Edwards & Walters 
Mortimer ft Carh'y 

Strand 

(6-12) 
Dave Rindler 
Boothby ft Bverd'n 
Andree Sis ft P 
B Kelly Forrest 
Clifford 8 

LYNN 
Gordon Olympia 
Kartelli 
Marconi ft Fits 
2 Ladellas 
Daree's Celebrities 
(One to nil) 
2d half 
Ray A Arthur 



Allen ft Lyman 
Geo Yoeman 
J Hayward Co 
(One to fill) 

Waldorf 
Swan ft Swan 
Brown ft Jackson 
"Brother Elk" 
Ash ft Hyams 
4 Harmony Kings 
Reslsta , ""- 

2d half 
Hooper ft Burkhart 
John McGowan Co 
Miller ft Mack 
Toot Sweet 4 
Dancing La Vars 
(One to fill) . -r. 

NEW BEDFORD 
Gordon's Olysspla 

Barbour ft Lynn 
McMahon Sis 
Geo Yoeman 
Martin ft Webb 
"The Miracle' 7 

2d halt 
Kartelli 

Ford ft Cunnlngh'm 
Marconi ft Fits 
2 Ladellas 
Bert Baker Co 
ftUINCy, MASS. 
Klnkatd 
Pasquelle ft G 
Ester 8 

2d half 
Gordon Duo 
Calvert ft Hayes 
ST. JOHNS, N. B. 
Opera Boose - 
(29-1) 
Toots & Pal 
Murray -ft Irwin 
Cowan ft Lewis 
Edwards ft W 
Mortimer ft Carb'y 

(2-4) , 
Dave Klndler 
Boothby ft Everd'n 
Adree Sis ft P 
B Kelly Forrest 
Oxford 8: 

SIDNEY, N. S. 
Palace 
(1-8) 
Evelyn O'Nell 
Edwards ft Siegel 
8 Heltons 
Brookhart Co ■ 

The Browns 

WALTBAM 

"Waldorf 

Miller ft Maok 
Toot Sweet 4 
Simmons ft Brantley 

2d half 
Swan A Swan 
Brown ft Jackson 
Ash ft Hyams 
Martini ft Fabrinl 



Claudia Coleman 
Geo Price 
Jerome ft Herbert 
The Plckfords 
Palace 
"Girlie Club" 
Kltner A Reaney 
The Langdons 
Corlne Tllton 
"Girl In Moon" 
Harry Tenny CO 
Libonatl 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Orpfcennt 
(Sunday opening) 
A Raaob Co 
A ft M Clark 
Norwood A Hall 
Kharum 
Melnotte Duo 
Bob ft Tip 
"Sweeties* 
NEW ORLEANS 

Orpheana 
Anna Chandler 
"Heart of A Wood" 
Ed ft L Ford 
"Dainty Marie" 
H B Toomer Co 
lHarry Jolson 
Frisco 

OMAHA 

Orpheana 
(Sunday opening) 
B Seeley Co 
Clccollni 
Bspe ft Dutton 
.Clifford Walker 
Garclnettl Bros 
The Sterlings 
Milton ft DeLongs 
PORTLAND, ORB. 

Orphenm 
(Sunday opening) 
Bessie Clayton Co 
"Current of Fun" 
B ft J Cretghton 
Casting Wards 
Hayden & Ercelle 
Harmon ft McManus 
Lambertl 

ST. I- oi' IS 

Orphenm 
"Overseas Revue" 
Ernest Evans Co 



Francis Renault 
Donovan A Lee 
Sam Hearn 
Everest's Monks 
ST. PAUL 

Orphean* 
(Sunday opening) 
Lee ft Cranston 
William Eds 
"Color Gems" 
Karl Emmy's Pets 
Kanasawa Japs 
The SharrookB 
SALT LAKE 

Orpheana .• 
(Wed. opening) 
"Reckless Five" 
Nellie Nlohols) 
Murphy ft White 
Edwin George .-'*.. 
Mile Nadje 
E T Alexandrl 
SAN FltAAOISOO 

Orpheana 
(Sunday opening) 
"Putting It Over* 1 
Steve Julia* 
Clinton Sisters 
La Bernlola Co 
Marlon Harris 
Marguerlta Bylva 

SBATTLE 

Orpheana 
(Sunday opening) 
Julius Tannen 
Will Ward & Girls 
Geo Kelley Co 
Frankle Heath Co 
Royal Gnscolgnes 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 

Orpheana 
Nash A O'Donnell 
Ted Doner 
Dunham ft O'Malley 
Rosa King Co 
Ray Snow 
The Seebacks 

WJNNIPKG 

' Orpheana 

Stone ft Kalis 
Norton ft L«e 
Tip Yip Yapbankera 
Maleta Bonconl 
Sybil Vane 
Mrs G Hughes Co 
Bell ft Wood 



WESTERN VAUDEVILLE 

8tate-Laks Theatre Bailding, Chl<age 



E. HEWMINDINGER NEW 
Jewelers to the Profession 

LIBERTY BONDS AOOIPTED 1*1. 



*»«" 



m 



ORPHEUM CIRCUIT 

Pslae* Theatre Bailding, New York City 



CALGARY 
Orphenm 

(555 

(Same bill plays 

Victoria 4-8) 
Mme Bills 
Belgium 8 
Regay ft Lorrainea 
Ja Da Trio 
Burt ft Rosedale 

CHICAGO 

Majestle 
Gertrude Hoffman 
Harry Green Co 
Bob Hall ( 
Van Cellos 
Bernard ft Duffy 
Briscoe A Rauh 
Cummins & White 
Bender ft Meehan 

Palace 
Spanish Dancers 
Eva Shirley Co 
Green A Myra 
Whitfield A Ireland 
Edith Clifford 
Collins ft Hart 
Enos Frazer 

State-Lake 
Nina Payne Co 
Jack Rose 
'Fixing Furnace" 
Dolly Kay 
Master Gabriel Co 
Cervo 

Holland Docwell Co 
Young & Wheeler 
(One to fill) 

DENVER 

Orpheana 
(Tuesday opening) 
Trlxie Fnlganza 
Janls & Caplow 
Harry Hines 
Sheila Terry Co 
Clifford & Wills 
Nathane Bros 
"Birds of Feather" 

DBS MOINES 

Orphenm 

(Sunday opening) 
Morgan Dancers 
Jimmy Save Co 
Stephens ft Holllster 
Weber & Tidnor 



Robbie Gordone 
Lydell ft Macey . 

Ergottea Lilliputians 

DULTJTH 

Orphenm 

(Sunday opening) 
"Not Yet Marie" 
Farrell Taylor Co 
Martelle 

Sidney ft Townley 
Kane Morey ft M 
Donald Roberts * 
J Morrlssey Co 

KANSAS CITY, HO. 
Orphenm 

(Sunday opening) 
Frank Dobson Co 
Lloyd ft Wells 
Harry Hoi man Co 
Great Lester ' 
Nlta ' Johnson , 
Brodean & Sllvermoon 
LaRue ft Dupree 

LINCOLN, NEB. 
Orphenm 
(8-6) 
"American Ace" 
H Hendler Co 
Dunham ft. Edwards 
Dave Ferguson Co 
Williams ft Mitchell 
8 Jahns 

LOS ANGELES 
Orplienm 

Halg ft waldron 
Oscar Lorraine 
Bailey & Cowan 
"Planovllle" 
Mason ft Forrest 
Harry Watson Co 
Lilson Connelll 
MEMPHIS 
Orphenm 
Geo MacFarlane 
Bradley ft Ardlne 
O'Donnell ft Blair 
Salla Bros 
(Two to nil) 

MILWAUKEE 
Majestlo 

Grace LaRue 
Ivan Bank off Co 
To to 
Jos C Bernard Co 



Lillian's Do. 
Follls. ft LeRoy 



ALTON, ILL. 
Hippodrome 

8 Vassar Girls 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Manning ft Hall 
Lasova ft Gllmore 

BBLLVILLB, ILL. 

Washington 
Folsom ft Brown 
Clayton ft Lennle 
Minnie Stanley Co 

2d halt 
The Kuhena 
Burdell ft Burden 
(One to fill) 

GRAND HAPIDB 
Majestle 
Wyoming Trio 
Beck & stone 
Wilkens ft WUkens 
Brltt Wood 

(Two to mi) 

2d half 

eRi 
Lachman Sisters 
Chas ft Mad Dunbar 
Rublo-inas Tr- 
CHAHPAIGN, ILL. 

Orphean 
Lawton 

Brierre ft King 
H G Woodward Co 
E ft B Gordon * 
8 Mel v in Bros \ 

2d half " 
Little Elk Co 
C ft T Harvey . 
B Fredericks Co 
Frear Baggott ft F 
(One to nil) 

CHICAGO. 
American 
Henry ft May 
A West Co 
Delton Mareeno & D 
(Three to nil) 

2d half 
Belle ft Arllss 
H & E Conley 
Hugo Lutgens 
(Three to nil) 

Hippodrome 
Fagle Dale Co 
Lamey ft Pearson 
Cavanna Duo 
Wlnchell ft Green 
"Oh Auntie" 
Cameron ft Ken 
Tennelle Trio 
Lapearl ft Blondell 
Leroy ft Harvey 
Bqulllo Bros 
(Others to All) 

Kedsle 
Arthur Devoy Co 
Conway ft Fields 
Bublo Inas Tr 

2d half 
Wilkens & Wilkens 
Nina Sullivan Co 
Ben Benny » 

Lincoln 
Belle Arllss 
HAS Conley 
Dorothy Vaughn 
Cantor's Mlna 
.<TWQ to flll>. 



2d half 
Sylvan A Copeland 
Henry ft May 
Arthur West Co 
(Three to nil) 
DAVENPORT. 
ColumMs) 
Bimbo ft James 
P & P Houlton 
Maryland Singers 
Nick Hufford 
"Begin of World" 

Id half 
John S Blondy Co 
Beck A Stone 
James H Cult en 
Cabaret DeLuxe 
(One to All) 

DECATUR, ILL. 

Empress 
Fulton A Maok 
Clifton A Dale 
'"Brazilian Heiress*' 
Neal Abel 

2d halt 
Lawton 

Brierre ft King 
H G Woodward Co 
Delton Mareena ft D 

DULUTRV 
Grand 

(Superior Split) 

1st half 
Pantser Duo 
Flager ft Malta 
B Baker ft S Girls 
Rome ft Wager 
(One to All) 
E. ST.^OVIS, ILL. 

Bbern 
Hector 

MoLaln Gates Co 
' Manning ft Hall 
LaSova ft Gllmore 

2d half 
Oren ft Drew 
Minnie Stanley 
Wanxer & Palmer 
Time ft Tyle 
EVANSVILLB, DVD. 

Grand 
Sardaroff ft Sonta 
Lee ft Lawrence 
Golden Bird 
Orth ft Cody s 
Moran ft Welser 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Juggling Dearmo 
Jeanette Chllds 
New Laesder 
Neal Abel 
KlutlngS Co 
(One to nil) 
GREEN BAY, WIS. 
Orphenm 

2d half 
Dorothy Vaughn 
Ward & Wilson 
Bell's Hawalians 
(One to All) 

MADISON. 
Orphenm 
John Maraton Co 
Ward ft Wilson 
Bell's Hawalians 
(Two to fill) 



2d half 
Dave Manley 
Mason Kenny 
(Three to fill) 
MINNEAPOLIS. 

Grand 
Faye ft Thomas 
George Paul Co 
DltBel ft Carrol 
(One to nil) 

Palace 



ft S 



Louts Brocades 
Alice Nelson Co 

Odlva 

SIOUX CITY* IA. 
Orphenm 

Mahoney A Auburn 
Weir A King - 
U S Jass Band 
Newhoff A Phelps 
H L Wallin 8 
2d half 
Leonard & Wright Wyoming Trio 
Howard A Lewis Arnold Trio 
Louis Brocades Fred Lewis 

Alice Nelson Co tj g j a zs Band 

(0nB 2d halt (rwo to flU) 

Dorothy Southern 8 80, BEND, IND. 



m 



Orphenm 
BHlie A Dot 
Hugo Lutgens 
"Flirtation" 
(Two to nil) 

2d half - 

"i Sweethearts" 
Jack Osterman 
Powell Troupe 
(Two to nil) 
SPRINGFIELD, DLL. 

Msjestte 
Little Elk Co 
2 Rubens 
B Fredericks Co 
CAT Harvey . 
Waneer ft Palmer 1 - 
Frear Baggott ft F. 

2d half 
Kerr ft Ensign 
Nick HufTord 
"RrRzlllan Heiress*? 
Miller ft Lyle. 
8 Melvln Bros 
(One to Ml) V , ; 

SUPERIOR. 
Palaee •- 

(Duluth Split) 
1st half 
Davis & Castle 
Bob ft Pesrgy 
Keno ft Wagner ■ 
Chas Millard Co 



Redman ft Wells 
Leigh Delacey Co 
Keating ft Walton 
(One to nil) 

MOLINB, ILK 
Palace 
Laws on 
Follls ft LeRoy 
Carbaret DeLuxe 
Jimmy Lyons s 
Lillian's Dogs 
2d half 
Bimbo ft James 
P ft P Houlton 
Lucy Gillette 
Frank Devoe 
"Begin of World" 

ST. LOUIS. 

Columbia 
McNutt & Evelyn 
DeWltt ft Gunther 
(Three to nil) 

, Sd half 
Kremka Bros. 
Clayton & Lenno 
Melody Garden 
Jenks ft Allen 
(One to nil) 

Grand / 
Danny Simmons 
InHeld ft Noblet 
Billy Miller Co 
Gilbert ft Saul 
Happy J Gardner Co Wright's Hawalians 



■■■;■- 



Degnon ft Clifton 

Rlalto 
Kremka Bros 
Oren ft Drew 
Miller A Lyle 
(Two to nit) 

2d half 
Hector 

8 Vassar Girls 
DeWltt ft Gunthor 
(Two to fill) 

Skydeme.. . 
Burdell ft Burdell 
Burns ft Wilson 
Time ft Tyle 
Folson ft Brown . 
(More to follow) 

ST. PAUL. 
Palace 

Kenny Mason ft 
Redman ft Wells 
"Her Trouseau" 
Kondal Pearl ft I 
-Odlva" 

2d half 
Leonard ft Wright 
Howard ft Lewis 



TBRRE HAUTE, 
IND. 

Hippodrome 

Jug-gllng D'Armo .'. — £: 

Jeanette Chllds 

"New Leader" 

Oene Greece 

Klutlngs Co ; : \ 

(One to nil) 
2d half 

Samnroff ft SonlS 

Lee ft Lawrence 

"flnlden Bird" 

Orth ft Cody 

Gene Greene . 

Moon ft Wiser 
WINNIPEG, 
Strand 

Victoria Goodwin 
B "When we grow up" 

Kings of Harmony 

Seymores Family 
S 2d half 

Howard ft Graf 

Harris ft Lvman - ^; 

D Graves Co \ 

Keno Keys ft M 



MARCUS LOEW 

Patnam Bailding, New York City 



NEW YORK CITY. 
American 

Musioal Christies 
*Sandifer ft B 
•Leddy ft Leddy 
•Dwyer ft May 
•Brown G & B 
Dave Thursby 
Morgan ft Gray 
•Swarts ft Clifford 
•King & Brown 

2d half 
•Stanley 
•5 Petrovas 
W A M Rogers 
•Carlisle ft Romer 
•Plunkett ft Sates 
•Sam Howard Co 
Wm Slsto 
•Magee ft Anita 
(One to nil) 

Victoria 
Caplan & Wells 
Manning F ft K 
Mr ft Mrs H1U Co 
Mel Klee 
M Burke ft Band 

2d half 
C Williams ft Daisy 
Dave Thursby 
Lambertl 
Barron ft Burt 
i8tafford & DeRoSB 

Lincoln 
Dancing McDonalds 
Henry Frey 
LeHoen ft Dupreece 
King A Harvey 
Boudlni ft Bernard 

2d half 
The Lelands 
Crelghton ft Stamm 
McCarthy ft 8 
Barnes ft Freeman 
Brown G ft B 

Greeley Square 
Bell & Gray 
•Sgt Jim Burke 
•Plunkett ft Sates 
•Sam Howard ft Co 
Nelson ft Cronln 
•5 American Girls 

2d half 
•Thelma ft L 
•Cavanaugh A T 



ire-: v iViSsO 
'"ft J 

B : -,, :.v-,,il«ir« 



Armstrong ft Smith 
Mel Klee 7V V 

M Burke A Band 
(One to till) ■ 

D dancey 
Thelma A L 
Chas Re 111 v 
Fashions Db Vogue 
Anthony ft Ross 
Ed Allen A Taxis i 
(One to nil) 

2d half 
Caplan A Wells 
Ferdinand 
Harrison A Burr 
B M Hall Co 
Adraln 

LaFollette ft Co 
National _ 
'McDermott ft C 
Helen MOrettl 
Lambertl 

Barnes ft Freeman 
Beattle A Blorae 

2d half 
Krayona « Co ■ 
Al Tyler 
Kahn ft Boone 
"Argonne 6" .fc rt, 

Boudlni ft Bernard **0' 

Orphenm 
Williams & Daisy 
•Kahn ft Boons 
Willie Smith 
•McCarthy ft S 
Barron & Burt 
LaFollette ft Co v 

2d half ■ 
•King ft Brown \. :. 
Dwyer ft May 
Henry Frey 
Harry Brooks Co 
L W Gilbert Co 
•6 American Girls 

Benlerard 
4 Cliffords 
Ferdinand ' 
E M Hall Co 
L W Gilbert Co 
Stafford ft DeRois 

2d half 
Mildred Rogers 
Harold Helr.ian Co ». 
King ft Harvey P. 
Leddy ft Leddy. : »• 
• sy 



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TJonlevnrd 
.■■;•.' 4 CHffordB 

Ferdinand • 

E M Hall Co 
L W Gilbert Co 
Stafford & DeRoss 

2d half 
Mildred Rogers 
Harold Selman Co 
Kin* & Harvey 
Leddy & Leddy 
(One to fill) 

Avenne B 
Hartley's M 
. Grace Leonard Co 
Taylor & Francis 
Martin & Courtney 
Bert Hanlon 
: (One to fill) 
2d half 
Nick Verga 
Millard & Doyle 
*j*£>e Owl" 

/:*.?,e Mills & Co 
> -Wfttle & Blome 
r /pJne to fill) 

* "* BROOKLYN. 



,-. 



8 Metropolitan 

Harrison & Burr 
•Carlisle & Romer 
Wm Slato 
•5 Petrovas 
(One to fill) 
2d half 
' « Cliffords 

Willie Smith 
.i Morgan Gray > . 
Swarz & Clifford 
» •"Cairo" 

IlrKnlb 

♦Stanley 

•Crelghton & Stam 
•Mildred Rogers 
Harold Solman Co 
Adrian 

2d half 
Bell & Gray 
Rose Garden 
• Clark & Francis 
Nelson & Cronln 
LaHoen & Dupreece 

Palace 
S Lilies 
Bud Doyle 
Carroll & Coffman 
June Mill" Co 
"The Owl" 

. 2d half 
Gladys Kolton 
Wells & Crest 
Martin A Courtney 
Bert Hanlon 
(One to fill) 

Fulton 
Krayona & Co 
Cavanaugh & T 
Clark & Francis 
Will & Mary Rogers 
Argonne 5 

2d half 
Dancing McDonalds 
Helen Morettl • 
Coffman & Carroll 
Anthony & Ross 
Fashions DeVogue 

Wnrwlrk 

Gladys Kelton 
Millard A Doyle 
Harrv Brooks Co 
Munford * Stanley 
(One to nil) 
. 2d half 

Karaey's M 
Bud Boyle 
'Mr. ft Mrs Hill Cb 
Zuhn A Drels 
8 Black Dots 
ATLANTA, 
flrnnti 
Aerial Belmonta 
Ferguson & 8 
Jim Reynolds 
Wayne A Allen 
(One to fill) 

2d half 
Morton Bros 
Howard & Jenkins 
Warlnp- & Alnslee 
Mahoney & Rogers 

IrtLTIWORB 

Illnnoilromr 

Ed A- Kdna Fanton 
Jack Reddy 
gulHvsn Scott 
Armstrong A JameB 
Bemevlcl Bros 
lURM'^OHAM. 

... N ' nijou 

•Renn f, Ton I Ins 
J Mbxtotipv Hurst 
J-MA^Ed Farrell Co 
l p Tnman * Horton 
Payton &. Ward 

2d half 
(Sams as Atlanta 
1st half) 

BOSTON. 
Oriincum 



, •Ilnnn It 1 



§ Gregorys 
t< 



u 



_ eve TFreda 
LaRue & uresham 
Laurie Ordway Co 
Jean Lelu-hton's Rev 
(One to flit) 

2d half 
Aerial n Goffs 
Frniser Bunce & H 
Fnlov & LaTure 
Clark & Crawford 
Bcanlon Denno & 8 
(One to nil) 

CffTCAOO. 



fe? U)b 1 MvVlrkera 

•t'" : A n?>eHal LftVnlls 

J; * cli J5mmett A Moore 
l! Poggy Brooks 

LV « Royal Hussars 



:/V 



Fields & Wells 
Rose Revue 

CLEVELAND. 
Liberty 

Harrison ft H 
Norah Allen Co 
Mllloy Keogh Co 
Mel Klee 
Summer Girls & G 

DETROIT. 
Colonial - 

The Ferraros 
Duffy a Montague 
Ed Phillips 
"Just for Instance" 
Carson & Wlllard 
"Full of Pep" 

FALL RIVER. 
Bljoa 

Aerial D Goffs 
Frazer Bunce A H 
Foley A LaTure 
Clark A Crawford 
Scanlon Denno AS 

2d half 
8 Gregorys 
Steve Freda 
LaRue A Gresham 
Laurie Ordway Co 
J Lelghton's Revue 

HAMILTON, CAN. ' 
• • • Loew 

Dolly A Cnlame 
L'Estrange Misses 
8 Rozellaa 
Lane A Moran 
Hanlon A Clifton 

HOBOKBN. 

I.oeiv 

Robinson & Thomas 
Two Taquins 
Wells A Crest 
(Two to fill) 

2d half 
Ferguson & Romaln 
Taylor A Francis 
(Three tp nil) 

KANSAS* CITY, MO. 

Krapre«- 

Stone A Mitchell 
Sheppard ft Ott 
Vlca Versa 
Harry C Greey 
Marr A Evans 

2d half 
Canarls A Cleo 
Cook A Ontman 
Chas Deland Co 
Will J Evans 
Wheeler Trio 

MEMPHIS. 

Lyceum 

Van Orden A F 
Storey ft Clark 
Anderson ft Rean 
Hilbert A Nugent 
Clyde Nelson Co 

2d half 
(Some as Birm- 
ingham 1st half) 

MONTHKAL. 
Loew 
Gordon A Gordon 
Murphy & Klein 
Little Lord Roberts 
Dudley Douglas 
Plerrea Sextet 
NEW ORLEANS. 

Crescent 
(Sunday opening) 
LeVeaux 
Goldle A Ayers 
Godfrey A H 
Bert Walton 
H A A 8cranton 

2d half 
(Same as Memphis 
1st half) 
NEW ROCHELLB. 

Loew 
Chyo A Chyo 
Ford A Goodrldge 
Zuhn A Drets 

2d half 
White Steppers 
Mumford A Stanley 
Fuji Japs 
PALIS A DB PARK 
Artola Bros 
The Arnoldos 
(Two t,o nil) 

PATERSON, N. J. 

Loew 
Cooper A Lacey 
Thos Potter Dunn 
Metropolitan 8 

PITTSBURGH. 

Lyceum 
P George 
Flo Ring" 
Cardo A RTnoo 
Merlans Pegs 
(One to nil) 

PROVIDENCE. 
Emery 

Francis A Wilson 
Thornton ft T 
Betty Elnred Co 
TTbert Carlton 
Peerless Trio 
2d half 
(Same as Spring- 
field 1st half) 

ST. LOUIS. 
Oniric k 

Cornelia A Adele 
Dick Mack 
Dahl ft Walling 
Dora Hilton Co 
Barrod Bros 

2d half 
(Same an Kansas 
City 1st half) 



V. 



■ PRINC. FIELD. 
Broadway 

Mae A Mack 
Francis ft Hackett 
Royal Four 
Langton ft Smith 
8 Daring Sisters ' 

'2d half 
(Same as Providence Race A Edge 
1st half) "Love A Kisses" 

PANTAGES CIRCUIT 

New York and Chicago Offices . 



TORONTO. 

Yoage 

Irma A Connor 
Billy Brown 
Van A Vernon 
Henshaw A Avery 



ACKERMAN & HARRIS CIRCUIT. 

San Franelice 



BUTTE. 

V Fanfares 
(«-») 
(Same bill ] 
Anaconda 10; 
soula 11) 
"Oh Billy" 
Hall A Shapiro 
Joe Roberts 
David S Hall Co 
Stagpole A Spier 
Mozarts 

CALGARY. 
Pantanes 
8 ft M Laurel 
Revue De Vogue 
Long A Ward 
Frltchle ' 
8 White Kuhns 
8 Bartos 

DENVER. . 
Pantages 
Kajlyama 
Hager & Goodwin 



PORTLANB. 

' Fantasies 

Joe Jackson 
. s Bobble Honphaw 
s- The Shattucks 
Rlalto Quartet 
Gllraln Dancers 
Gaylord Herron 
RBGINA, CAN. 

Pantagea 
v ' (1-8) 
(Same bill plays 
Saskatoon 4-6) 
Wolfe ft Patterson 
W E Whittle 
Kilkenny Four 
Tanean • ■ 

Amoros A Jeanette 
Kuma 4 

SALT LAKE 
Pantaaea 
Kelly Field Players 
Joe Darcy 
4 Rennees 



Rhoda ft Crampton S A A Beverly 



Monroe A Grant 
Lawrence A E 
8 Harmony Maids 
EDMONTON. 

Pantagea 
Four Leons 
Frank Ward 
Qulgley A F 
Dance Fantasy 
Dunbar A Turner 
"Temptation" 
GT. FALLS. 

Panta 



/ 



• ntniir 

(2-8) 

bill 



(Same 
Helena 4) 
"Oh Teddy" 
Frank Bush 
G 8 Gordon Co 
Georgia Howard 
Heros ft Preston 
McNamara A C 
LONG BEACH, CAL. 

Pontages 
Empire Quartet 
Leila Shaw Co 
Cliff Clark 
Amoros A Obey 
Singer's Midgets 
Joe Fanton Co 
LOS ANGELES. 

Pantaatea 
Primrose Minstrels 
Revue DeLuxe 
Booth ft Leander 
LeRoy A Dresner 
Mmo Booth 
Crock Hunters 
MINNEAPOLIS. 

Pantagea 
(Sunday Opening) 
Naynon's Birds 
Burns ft Lynn 
Chas Llndholm Co 
Son la DeClave 
Bison City 4 
Blatkbs Rollickers 
OAKLAND. 

Pnntaaca 
(Sunday opening) 
Novelty Minstrels 
The Cromwells 
"Submarine F 7" 
Argo ft Va Sis 
Juliet Dlka 
Green A Pugb 

OGDRN. 

Panta BM 
(4-8) 
Shepp'a Circus 
Ramnroff Trio 
Tetter Septette 
Cook A Lorens 
Arthur Lloyd 
" Girls from 8" 



Monroe A Grant 
Harris ft Nolan 
SAN DIEGO 
Pantaaea 
Song A Dance Rovue 
Meyers A Weaver 
Betty Brooks 
Better Bros 
Dorothy Walter 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Pantaata 
(Sunday opening) 
Broalns A Brown 
Comina Generation 
plays . Hello people Hello 
Richard the Great 
Dorothy Lewis 
SEATTLE 
Pantagea 
Uyeno Japs 
Venetian Gypsies 
Sllber A North 
Lady Alice's Pets 
La Petite Eva 
Weber ft Elliott 
SPOKANE ' 
PantnarcN 
"Honeymoon Inn" 
Shaw A Bernard 
Makaremka Duo 
Murry Livingston 
Austin A Delaney 
Rials 

TACOMA 
Pnntaaiea 
Imperial Quintet 
Ray ft Emma Dean 
Ray Conlln 
8 Romanoff Sis 
Little Lambs 
Florence Rayneld 
VANCOUVER 
Pantaacen 
Marie Fitzgibbon 
LeGrohs 

Chlsholm ft Breen 
Panama Trio 
Dorsch ft Russell 



BAKRRSFRZLD. 
Hippodrome 

(81-1) 
John Gelger 
Sketly ft Helt 
D Flint Co 

(2-4) . 
P Lavan ft Miller 
(One to All) 

(6-fi> 
Eddie A Lillian 
(One to fill) 

FRESNO. 
Hippodrome . 

Lowry ft Catherine 
Gulliana Four . 
Mack A Lane 
Eddie A Lillian 
Paul Lavah A Miller 

2d halt 
Milton ft Venus 
Payton ft Hlckey 
(Others to All) 

LOS ANGELES 

Hippodrome 

Church Sisters 
Veopolltan 4 
Logan Dunn A H 
Davis A McCoy 
Wlntergarden 4 I 
Theodores 3 

2d half 
Stanley ft Wilson 
Lowry A Catherine 

SACRAMENTO. 

Hippodrome 

Kale & Coyne 
Conrad ft Jarvls 
8 Beauties 
Geo McFadden 
3 Fishers 

2d half 
"Girls of 61" 
Alf Ripon 
"Dreamland" 
Lee ft Bennett 
Bender ft Herr 



BAN DIEGO. 
Hippodrome 

Madden 

Nixon A Norrla 
Clifford A Marsh 
Talbert A Fisher 
Alex Rull A Dolls 

2d half 
Church Sisters 
Davis A McCoy 
Logan Dunn A H 
Mason A Austin 
Clara Theodoros 8 
SAN FIIANCISCO. 

• Casino 
(Sunday opening). 
Morris Slftere 
Francis A Alex 
Gray & Jackson 
Smith A Laurence 
S Macks 

Hippodrome 
(Sunday opening) 
Jack ft Pearl Hall 
Mossman A Vance 
"Rusticating M" 
Miller A King i 
Fondella Trio 
STOCKTON. 
Hippodrome 
Walter Gilbert 
Gypsey Meredith 
Myers A Knlse 
Wynn Lorraine 
Sig Franz Troup 

2d half 
(Same as Sacra- 
mento 1st half) 
TAFT, CAL. 
Hippodrome 
(31) 
Eddy Sisters 
"Remnants" 
Stanley ft Wilson 

(6-6) 
Skeliy A Helt 
Lavan A Miller 
Douglas Flint Co 
John Gelger 



PARIS 

Alhnmbra 

Cliff Berzac 
Skating: Nelsons 
A F Ward 
Laurie de Vino 



Oswald Bemand 
Tex McLeod 
4 lamiiy Girls 
Moorel 4 

Conway A Leyland 
(Two to All) 



AMONG THE MUSIC MEN. 

Sid Carey hat Joined the professional staff 
of Jos. W. Stern. 



Harry Goodwin, returned from service with 
the A. E. P., li now connected with Stern. 

Carl Lament will manage Harry Von T11- 
zer's new San Francisco offlce. 



Harry Van TlUer Is composing the 
of a show written by Wilson Colltson. 

Alex Marr has quit vaudeville and rejoined 
the writing staff of Joe Morris Co. 



Alex Oerber and Abner Silver, Wltmark 
stff writers, art vacationing In the Adlron- 

dacks. 



Art Hall, -the phonograph vocalist. Is doing 
active duty under the MeKinley Music Com- 
pany's banner. 



Kremlin of Moscow * *• CaeRar DB9 P , » ce<, ■ neTr b,(rtl C,BM nunl - 
vi J^rnniA ber . "Only," with the Irving Berlin Co. Harry 

Akat collaborated on It. 

"I've Found Ibe Neatlng'Place of the Blue-' 
bird," by Abe Olman, has been accepted by 
the Henry Burr Music Corp., for publication. 



VICTORIA 
Pantaates 
Jarvls Revue 
Candeld ft Rose 
Porter J White Co 
Morak Sis 
Anita Arllss 
AJ Wohlman 
T WINNIPEG 
Pnntnjxed 

Golf Lfhk Girls 
Ross Wyse Co 
"Number Please" 
Belle Oliver 
Cook A Vernon 
Cycling Brunettes 



Hedktna-Pantafw Beeklnga 



. DALLAS. TEX. 
Jefferson 

Joe A Rosle Moy 
Klass ft Termini 
John G Sparks Co 
Ben Linn 
Colleee Girls F ' 
HOUSTON. TEX. 
Prince 
Gordon A Day 
Jimmy Brltt 
"Taar Day" 
Eddie Ross 
H Emllon 3 
MUSKOGEE, OKI*. 
Brondway 
(31-1) 



(Same bill plays 

Waco 2-4; Austin 

5-ft) 

Hall A Guild*. 

Valmont A Roymen 

M Russell Co 

Tom Kelly 

Cp Dick Jazi Band 

SAN ANTONIO. 
Royal 

Alice Teddy 
Joe Reed 
Abrams A Johns 
Caltea ft Beatrice 
Anderson's Co 



Charles K. Harris next Sunday evening at 
the .Barney Fagan testimonial, will conduct 
the orchestra. In honor ot the beneficiary 
veteran minstrel and song writer. 

Harry Goodwin is again associated with 
Jos. W. Stern 4 Co., after two years absence 
In the service. George Levey Is beck with 
the Stern firm after service In the Nary. 

Billy Griffith 1s T wlth the New York pro- 
fessional department of Remlrk ft Co. He 
last was pianist with the Gertrude Eastmad 
act 



INTERSTATE CIRCUIT 

Palace Theatre Building. New York City 



DALLAS, TEX. 
Majeatle 

Earle & Earle 
Fox ft Mayo 
E F Hawley Co 
Elsie White Co 
Hlckey Bros 
DufTy ft Caldwell 
Marie Hart Co 
FORT WORTH, 
. TEX 
Majeatla 
Burke ft Betty 



Ann Cuter 
C Sllvernnll Co 
Lexey ft Rome, 
Swift ft Kelly 
The Reynolds 
HOUSTON. TEX. 
Majeatle 
MoRae ft CI egg 
8heldon A Ballsy 
Werner Amoros Co 
Barnes ft Crawford 
Patrlcola ft Meyers 
Fong Gue A Haw 



C. C. Churcb ft Co., a Hartford music pub- 
lishing concern, has located offices In New 
York City. Anothor new recruit to the local 
publishing homes, is the Gilbert firm. Gil- 
bert was focmerly a free-lance songwriter. 

Willie Pierce Is going to Philadelphia as 
professional manager for McCarthy ft Fisher. 
He will open a new office In about three weeks 
In the Olobe Theatre Bldg. Until these quar- 
ters are ready, he will be located in the 
Keith's Theatre Bldg., In that city. 

A songwrttsr chap, young In years but pre- 
maturely bald, broke In a two-act recently 
with more tban a fair measure of success. 
Meeting an agent the other day, he offered him 
his act for bookings. The agent replied, "Yes, 
It's a good act but I can't think of booking 
It because you are getting hnld," The song- 
writer If on tlie road to recovery from the 
nervous shock. 

The old N. V, A. rooms that are now th« 
studios of Irving Berlin, Inc., present a very 
elassy look for a muste publishing headquar- 
ters, through the arraganement given them 
by the members of the new concern, Irving 
Berlin. ty al Wlnslow and Saul K. Born«tc!n. 
The former reception rooms of the N. V. A, 
have been converted Into the general offices. , 



Tbs remainder of the suite running down the 
48th street side Is a succession of piano rooms, 
with the deadened walls really confining the 
sound of the music to the rooms It Is played 
In. Standing in the large oblong or waiting 
room that takes up the centre spsce of the 
suite, the music from the piano rooms li not 
heard at all exceptlnr when a door may be 
opened. In the southern end Is Mr. Berlin's 
private offlce. Behind that Is the shipping 
department. The first room of the profes- 
sional department Is Mr. Wlnslow's. Some 
of the furnishings that graced tbe old N. V; 
A. quarters are stHI there, arranged, but still 
dispelling an atmosphere of class in the sur- 
roundings that Is seldom found in a business 
office. The Berlin suite Is on tbe third floor 
of the building, at Broadway and 48th street. 
A commodious elevator makes the trip with- 
in the speed limit and you walk from the lift 
right Into the offlce. The Berlin studios are 
becoming one of the sight places among those 
who have dealings with music. Since being 
there Max Wlnslow has been shaving rcg- 
ulnrly, has his clothes pressed now when he 
takes them off and doesn't swear dirty any 
more. > ■',;'■'. 

JUDGMENTS. 

Judgments filed In the County Clerk's office. 
The first named Is that of the Judgment debtor, 
the second the Judgment creditor, and the 
amount of Judgment. 
Harry First ; B. Kanzal ; $144.70. 
Briton N. Bunch ; P. X. Moore, et al. : $848.4.7. 
Lew Leslie; M. Rosenthal et al.; $102.18. 






- . < 



ENGAGEMENTS. 






Bdythe Wnltnoy, "Greenwich Village Fol- 
lies," 

Vera Meyers, Stewart ft Morrison's musical 
comedy. 

Margaret White, Robert H. Russell, "Hel- 
lo Alexander I" ■!.':■':*,' 

Felix Adler, "The Frlvolties of 1919." 

Harold De Becker. "Three's A Crowd." ,-: ., 

Edgar Nelson, "Double Harness." 

NEWS 0F _ THE DAILIES. 

The season for the Gallo English Opera 
Co. will open Labor Day at the Shubort . 

The Sbuberts are engaging casts for two 
"Maytlme" companies. 

■ ■'•.'.. 

Dr. Karl Muck, former leader of the Bet* , 
ton Symphony Orchestra. Interned during the 
war, was deported Aug. 21. 

Maro Klaw will produce a musical come fly 
called "His Majesty the Queen." The book 
and lyrics are by Ethel Watta Mumford. . 

"Up from Nowhere" will he produced at the 
Comedy Sept. 10. It la a comedy by Booth 






Tarklnirton and Harry Wilson. 
vox Will bave the leading role. 



Norman Tre- 



Sousa's Band will appear at Plalnfleld, 
N. J., Sept. 22, which will mark tbe 2Tth an- 
niversary of tbe opening of the orlglntl 
Sousa's Band In that city. 

Anton 8c1bll1la Is engaging people for a.', 
new musical comedy, "My Once In a Whtle.f'.v 
to be produced Immediately. Tbe book, lyrics 
and muslo are by Charles George. 

Pleire Monteaux, leader of the Boston 8ym*' ■ 
phony Orchestra, arrived Aug. 25 from France 
with the works of several new French com- , 

posers. " ' •- ; 

Mmo. Ostoya Bracowna arrived on the Lor- ' 
rains. Aug. 2-\ to appear In a Russian play 
under Max Bablnoff's managsment It Is bstng , 
translated Into English for her and she has .; 
four weeks to learn her part ■:,•';: 

Lee Parvln, member In good standing of' 
the Alimony Club, left Chicago for Kansas - 
City Thursday In advance of the city company j 
or "Scandal" under the direction of Walter . 

Hast ■ - ■ ■ . '■■; f 

Through an order signed by Surrogate •■',' 
Cohnlan, Aug. 2fl, exempting the estate from 
Inheritance taxation, It Is disclosed that Daniel ' 
Prentice, husbsnd to Frankle Lee, the late- ' 
actress, left assets of $8,2.10 and liabilities 
of at least $23,777 when be died Sept 1», 
1016. >\ 

Modesty and respectability are tbe keynotes |"> 
exprensed by the ROD danotng masters who are . 
In annual convention at the Astor. It wsa 
unanimously voted that the "shimmy" had lo- 
go. A committee was formed whose duties will 
he to see that the "shivering shoulders" Is ' 
tabooed in all public dance rooms- 

Joseph Miller, Barthotdl Inn, New York, ; 
entd to .have been a member of tbe Dancing::, 
Millers, was held in $1,500 ball on .a charge of 
grand larceny by Magistrate Sweetser. In the; ' 
Went Side Court, Aug. 25. The charge was the 
theft of a gold watch and chain and pocket-, 
book, containing $1R0 belonging to Lawrence 
B. Grant, of Montreal. 

OBiTUARY. 

The toother of Camilte Personi died ;: 
San Francisco, Aug. 21. 



i 



in 



Rudolph E. S chirm er. 

Rudolph E. Sc'ilrmer died Aug. 20 In, 
Santa Barbara, Cal. The deceased wat 
head of the music publishing firm of G. 
Schirmer & Co., New York. '•'. 



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BULLETIN 



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NEW YORK, THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 1919 



i 



MANAGERS REFUSE OVERTURES 
FOR ADJUSTMENT OF STRIKE 

V .'•'•■ ■■- ■•'■'■' •• 

: • ■ * - 

Turn Down Proffer of Playwrights' Assistance After Equity 
Association Offers to Bind Itself Not to Demand Closed 
Shop During Life of Contract. Winter Garden Walk t 
Out of Stage Hands and Musicians. All Chicago ' 
$2 Theatres Now Dark. 

The event of the Actors' Equity As- 
•ociation's strike against the Producing 
'Managers' Association yesterday was 
the blunt refusal of the managers to 
entertain the overtures of the con- 
(S venirig playwrights in the endeavors of 
the latter to bring about an adjustment 
r : .".; of the trouble. The playwrights met 
twice, despatched committees to both 
sides and finally announced their fail- . 
: ., are to interest the managers' associa- 
tion. At the A E. A. the committees 
• were received and at their request, the 
Equity, through its attorney, bound 
itself not to insist upon a Closed Shop 
during the life of any agreement and 
' to desposit a bond of indemnity to 
guarantee faithful performance. ' 
In addition to this it was reported 
. the playwrights' committees were en- 
„ powered to inform the managers, that 
the stage hands unions would agree 
as well that during any contract en- 
' tared into between the actors and man- 
agers' association; no sympathy strike 
would be called. If that is true and the 

r information is reliable, it .removed the 

'* . last vestige of the managers' an- 

*'• '■ nounced resistance, other than rec- ' 
ognition of the A. E. A., which still 
stands as the managers' sole reply. 
• It_ is not known if the playwrights 

: . calling on the managers stated all of 
their information. It was reported, in 
the Hotel Astor followign the meeting 
of the playwrights in the morning that 
a member of the managers' association, 
hearing of the complete terms the cpm- 
mittee was about to present to the 
managers, asked that the stage hands' 
portion be omitted. This manager was 
also reported as informing the play- 
wright he approached that they (mana- 
gers) had another and better plan on 
foot, with which the committee's full 
statement would interfere. It was as- 
sumed by those who had this informa- 
tion that the matter asked suppressed 
by the managers was the stage hands 
proffer. It was not known after the 



fi 



ctromittee's call upon the managers 
whether that had been told to them. 

Another manager during the day 
stated the efforts of Governor Al Smith 
would be futile, as. far as the managers' 
association was concerned. The mana- 
ger said Gov. Smith was trying to bring 
about an amicable agreement over 
the strike of luxury, and that in the 
case of a luxury, a strike could go on 
indefinitely without becoming a part of 
the public's welfare. 
i On another page of this. Bulletin is 
the report of the closing of all Chicago 
legit houses at yesterday's matinee, 
through the walk out by the stage hand 
and musicians in that city. It gives 
the Chicago dark list -nime theatres 
where shows have been closed since 
the strike started. Three ended their 
run at the instigation of the A. E..A 
and the other six were shut by yester- 
day's walkout. 

The only change in the Broadway sit- 
uation last night was the ordering out 
'of the stage hands and musicians at 
the Winter Garden. The Winter Gar- 
den, since the first strike order of the 
A. E. A., has been giving chorus num- 
bers from the attraction, "Monte 
Chrlsto, Jr.,"' with vaudeville. Past the- 
atre time last night the Garden con- 
tinued to sell tickets and was giving a 
a performance with a piano accompan- 
ist. The Booth with "The Better 'Ole" 
and the Playhouse with "At 9.45," the 
two remaining theatres not under the 
Exempt claassificataion of the A. E. A., 
were the only theatres on Broadway 
open. 

Picketing was very light around 
these houses. The crowds in Time 
square at nine o'clock last night 
seemed dense for that time of a Wed- 
nesday evening. All picture, Exempt 
theatres, vaudeville and burlesque 
houses were packed. 

The playwrights, despite the rebuffs 
first attempts, are meeting once again 
received from the managers in their 
this morning, to try again. 



UNION OR NON-UNION? 

The Bullboard, theatrical trade pub- 
lication reputed to be the official organ 
of Harry Mountford ancj the White 
Rats Actors' Union, and .which is now 
generally understood to be reporting 
the official news of the Actors' Equity 
Association activities, is issuing a "sup- 
plement" which -looks like a copy of 

Variety's, Daily Bulletin and which car- 
ries the Union Label of the Allied 
Printers* Trade Council of New York 
City, No. 160. . 

This "supplement'' also carries the 
volume number of the Bullboard (Vol. 
XXXI, No. 34), which apparently, makes 
the supplement a part of the parent 
publication. - .- ,. ■ 

Does this mean that 'local 160 of 
the New York Allied Printers' Trade 
Council sponsors the action of the 
Cincinnati non-union printers who are 
working on the non-union theatrical 
trade publication which is supposed to 
be the official organ of a national body 
of actors who are officially affiliated 
with the American Federation of 
Labor? . : 

The Bullboard is and has been pub- 
lished for years in a non-union shop. 
The only inference to be drawn from 
a union-printed "supplement" placed 
or inserted in the forward part of a 
non-union printed, paper is that the 
publisher is attempting to deceive 
union people who read the paper that 
the entire paper is union printed. This 
deception comes from the union label 
carried under the title of the Bull- 
board, a non-union publication, in the 
first page of the "supplement" under 
the title. 



SPECS LOSSES OVER $30,000. 

The theatre ticket speculators lost 
■over $30,000 in the first two weeks of 
the actors' strike which ended last, 
night. 

One of the most prominent of the 
brokers stated yesterday the actors 
and managers both seemed to' forget 
them entirely in their present battle. 



SAM HARRIS DISCHARGED. 

The charge of disorderly conduct 
preferred against Sam Harris, of Cohan 
and Harris, by Harry Lambart, who 
alleged Harris had "taken him by the 
scruff of the neck and the middle of 
his back and forcibly run him from 

the Cohan and Harris Theatre" way 
dismissed yesterday in West 54th St. 
Court by Magistrate. Sweetser, The. 
Magistrate commented on the com- 
parative build' of both men, where- 
upon Lambart declared that Harris had '• 
the advantage, because he ran him 
down hill on a steep grade and his. 
defense was therefore handicappd. . 

Harris had brought a counter charge 
of trespassing on his property against 
Lambart, and this charge was alio ; 
thrown out. 



Bl 



.■ •>, 



''■« 



HEADQUARTERS NOT MOVING, 

The A. E. A. 45th street strike head 
quarters was all set for removal to i 
305 West 54th street last night, an /. 
announcement o^f flfe removal, going.' ( ,,;<Y 
up on the bulletin board at 10 o'clock. 

Shortly, after that hour, however, 
Harry Brown' and several members of 
he A. E. A. Council decided it would 
be foolish to move out of the Broad 
way zone, and another week's rent of 
the Present 45th street quarters ww 
handed over to the landlord. .- - 



II 



LAMBS' CLUB RESIGNATIONS: 

Three managers sent in their resig- 
nations to the Lambs yesterday. They! 
were Marc Klaw, Sam Harris and 
Arthur Hopkins; 

Each issued a copy of the letter 
which they had sent to the organiza- 
tion, in which tney stated their reasons 
for withdrawing. 



Ii 



■ vM 

iffl 



Managers' Registration List ..« 
Wallace Munro, who has chaiSQ^K' 
the Actors' Bureau of Re^gistfVi'pnd ■ 
which the managers have opened, rt 
ported yesterday there had been : 300 
applications to date and that yester- • "tej 
day there had been 60 cards filled out. Br 

W 



A 



NO CHARGE FOR BULLETIN 

' ., . ,;■;",.( ••( ■ •■,:., ;.'.; \ '■•"- 

'" Variety's Daily Bulletins are issued dally excepting Sunday during 
the strike and are distributed without charge. , • 

Any theatrical association, society or office may have the Bulletins 
delivered to it in reasonable quantity, or they can be obtained by 
calling at Variety's New York office, Broadway and 45th street. 

The weekly issue of Variety will be issued as usual on Fridays, 



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■■-■■■■■■ ■■-■■■■---'-■■■^;' VARIETY DAILY BULLETIN W$ , . '/ 



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AUTHOR'S CONFERENCES FAIL 
TO BRING ABOUT SETTLEMENT 



f\ Playwrights Efforts to Bring A. E. A. and* Producing Mana- 
gers' Association Together, "Strikingly Fail" According 
to Eugene Walter, Spokesman For the Mediators. 
Committee to Meet Again This Morning. 



[ifX In the effort to hear both sides of 

% the strike situation the conferences 

which the playwrights have been car 



the A. B. A. The oommlttee bad Just lett 
the Equity rooms, but Mr. Turner refused to 
give out any Information aa to what bad 
passed. At the managers' headquarters, Ar- 
thur Hopkins nu.de an Informal statement to 



,,,;„. nn c nr tVio nut twn rlava was a - the affect that the P. M. A. would not eon- 
rying on tor, tne past two aays was a j^w ^ pr0 j KMlUon wMcn contained the 



a 



great success, but in the effort to do 
anything that would help to clear the 
situation the entire scheme of things 
was a distinct failure. This conclusion 
was arrived at yesterday afternoon 
'when the final meeting on the strike 
question was held. 

The meeting was called for four 
o'clock. It didVnot convene until about 
five and about thirty minutes later 
Eugene Walter stepped from the meet- 



recognition of the A. B. A. aa part of it. 



m 

.f: ' 

' ! .'!■ •'. ing and made the following announce- 
V: mer.t: "Gentlemen, we have but one 
■-c? announcebent to make. It is that we 
have strikingly failed." 



;! > At the same time he informed the 
( ;•; members of the press the informal 
5; -conference that had been called by 



| 



i 



himself and Avery Hopwood had been 
concluded. However there was almost 
immediately a new meeting of play- 
wrights arranged and at that meeting 
(V a committee was formed which will 
,'. ' meet again this morning. The purpose 
of that committee is the formation of 
a society, of authors that will give 
them protection in the event that an- 
other occasion of this sort may arise 
sometime in the future. 

None of those present would make 
any statement regarding why the ef- 
forts of the authors had failed. The 
newspapermen were told that they 
might draw their own conclusions. 
Aftor the meeting that was started when 
f ■ 'Mr. Walter returned to the rooms after hla 
<>.' first announcement to the newspapermen, he 
I .reappeared after about 15 minutes and gave 
I ' /out the Information regarding the formation 
'A of tho new committee. Mr. Walter, seemed 
Inclined to side with the actor In bis later 
'■VUWpretsloM. He said that In a case were 
here were two conflicting parties and where 
■ |. ecause of tbls the author suffers bo believed 
, '■'-'■ at It was possible to secure a writ of man- 
t. ■'.' inua for the party that bad It In Its power 
f ">»' relieve the situation but refused to do so. 
Ma He stated that that would be the case In the 
event of a case of this sort where the striker 
was ready to mediate and the producer was 

■•£ # . . 

Tho flret meeting of tho authors took place 
yesterday morning at 10.80. While they were 
In session Wlnchell Smith appeared. He Is 
an author-producing manager. He spoke to 
Mr. Walter who was called from the meeting 
to confer with htm. He asked Mr. Walter 
to secure from the A. E. A. a written state- 
ment to tbe effect that they are not for the 
"dosed shop" as stated at the meeting yester- 
day, and that while be was making this re- 
quest unofficially, be believed that he .would 
bo able to go before the manafceraV rotating 
i yesterday afternoon and get them to offer to 
recognise the A. B. A. because of tho fact 
J "int he believed that the closed shop was 
&x*ii#f the principal stumbling blocks to an 
rSitVPi of tno difficulties. 
fp~_"itdlately the author* formed a commit- 
«E?of four constating of Eugene Walter, Oene 
! f Snick, Guy Bolton and Owen Davis. They 
i"*-- waited on the A. B. A. and received the 
written assurance which they requested. Aftor 
•' that they started on a hunt for Smith and 
later got together again with their members 
at the Alitor at 2. There was hut a short 
meeting at this time and at li.30 the same 
committee that vlsltfd the A. B. A. waited 
on the managers' association In session at 
the Cohan * Harris theatre building. 

i The . managers, according to the intima- 
tion given out at the authors' conference 
• i:' 'later, evidently made a flat refusal to the plan 
'■'. nf settlement which the authors bad brought 

i from the A. E. A. 
I .'. This refusal on the part of tho managers 
,'7 seemed to oxcrclse a stron* Influence over the 
W meeting of the authors which followed and 
'< V eeemlnglv there wore quite a number of the 
<i V plavwrlirhts who favored sldlnit with the ac- 
J-1 ;or In the present difficulty, while others were 
?••' VllfHy ccrtnln that nothing hut a neutral 
li ' 1 lD^Kd should be taken by the writers. 

KOD <lor to the time that tho manaears and 

. remembers of the outhors' committee got 

* ^her, an attempt was made to obtain a 

ment from Paul Turner, attorney for 






WILSON ON BELASCO. 

'Mr. Belasoo's belated attempt to discredit 
the President of tbe Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion la merely another of tbe silly efforts of 
the producing managers to becloud the situa- 
tion and contuse Equity members. 

It will fall because It Is spurious, cowardly 
and untrue. Furthermore, Mr. Belasco knows 
It Is untrue, because the very authority he 
quotes, bad be given the full text, confutes 
blm. 

Mr. Belasco charges me with being "tbe 
first to desert his fellow artists In their fight 
against the theatrical syndicate In 1899." 

That struggle was not, as now, the effort of 
the big player to secure the rights of tbe 
little player. It was a struggle of "star" 
actors to preserve their independence against 
managers wbo had "absorbed' 5 all the theatres 
of the country. 

Tbe "stars" mostly concerned were : Joseph 
Jefferson, Richard Mansfield, Fanny Davenport, 
James A. Hearne, William H. Crane, Nat Good- 
win, James O'Neill ("Nonte Chrllto"). Mrs. 
Fiske, and Francis Wilson. 

We organised and resolved to uphold our 
Independence. 

Augusttn Daly was offered the presidency. 
He declined, saying he knew actors and that 
"they were not to be trusted In the face of 
temptation." 

One by one, these "stars" found It expedient, 
profitable or adlvisable to drop away from tbe 
cause until, to quote Mr. Belasco's authority, 
Norman Hapgood's "History of tbe Stage In 

■Two prominent actors now stood alone- 
Mrs. Fiske and Francis Wilson." 

If, therefore, I was tbe last man out, what 
becomes of Belasco'a statement that I waa 
the firitl , » ' 

Belasco Is careful to say that Mr. Hapgood 
ts "accurate." I agree, and It pains me, there- 
fore, on his own authority, to impale Mr. 
Belasco with the short and ugly word. 

For fifteen months I stood up and fought 
the Theatrical Syndicate of America, and It 
pains me even now to admit that I was, to 
quote Br. Hapgood again, "overwhelming de- 
feated." I wrecked my fortune, I destroyed by 
clientele, by playing in ont-ot-the-way theatres 
to which they would not come and, upBupported 
by my fellow players, except Mrs. Fiske, I 
was on the point of abondlng my Country in 
the effort o make a new career, tn England. 
I suddenly determined not to be driven out; 
that I would fight tho devil with fire. I pur- 
posely threw myself In the way of Samuel F. 
Nixon of tbe Nixon ft Zimmerman Syndicate, 
managers, In Philadelphia. 

He said I was foolish to struggle further, 
that I wan "licked" and didn't know It I 
knew It well enough, hut bluffed on. I re- 
fused to permit any manager to nay where, 
when and on' what terms, except by agreement, 
I should play. He fell Into the trap and pro- 
posed to buy a half interest for three years- 
he could then .arrange terms and dates In our 
mutual Interest. I set the terms high. He 
mot them promptly. I might be obliged to sur- 
render, but I would make tbe surrender costly, 
and when the bargain was struck I told Mr. 
Nixon, he often repeated It, that he bad bought 
for many thousands of dollars that wblcb. In 
order to play In America, be could) bare se- 
cured on the morrow for nothing. 

If thlB be treachery to my brother artists, 
let Mr. Belasco make tbe moat of It 

I am glad to agree with Mr. Belasco that 
the actor Is "emotional and impressionable," 
perhaps I have said he was "shiftless," though 
I don't admit it No doubt I though he was 
even worse at that time. But I regained suffi- 
cient confidence in htm to settle down with 
blm In a six-years' struggle for hla rights 
and he has splendidly Justified that confidence, 
as recent events have shown. He has dis- 
proved August in Daly's dictum that he is not 
to be trusted in the face of tempatlon and I 
am always sincerely his 

FRANCIS WILSON. 



A.. L A. PARADES IN CHICAGO. 

Chicago, Aug. 20. 
' (Reprinted from weekly issue of 
Varibtt.) 

Nightly parades of the A. E. A. mem- 
bers in town will occur around theatre 
time, in the loop, says Edwin Mordant, 
representing the A. E. A. in this city. 
The first parade occurred last night 
with autos and pedestrians passing by 
the theatres. 

There will be a public mass meeting 
of the A. E. A. Friday. It will be held 
either at the Auditorium or old Amer- 
ican music halt 

Mr. Mordant officially denies that 
Edward Nockles, the labor man, is in 
charge of the local theatrical strike. 
Mordant states that only Burton 
Churchill and himself can act with 
A. E. A. authority. 

New Equity headquarters have been 
opened in the Masonic Temple. Mr. 
Mordant will have charge of a daily 
publicity service to be installed. 

It is announced that Clarence Dar- 
row will be co-counsel with Daniel 
Cruice as attorneys for the A. E. A. in 
this city. 



SHIPMAN TURNS DOWN OFFER. 

Sam Shipman said yesterday a com- 
mittee of actors, members of the A. E. 
A., and who #were to have appeared 
in his play "First Is Last," to have been 
produced by William Harris, had ap- 
proached him with an offer to take over 
the play and produce it 

According to the author they stated 
that they could secure the Park thea- 
tre for the piece. Shipman stated that 
he turned down the offer, 



CHICAGO STAGE HANDS' DEMANDS. 

(Reprinted from weekly issue of ' 
' Variety.) 

Chicago, Aug. 20. 
> During the meeting yesterday when 
it was announced the stage hands 
would walk out today, the stage hands 
also served notice on the managers 
that a new scale was wanted by. them. 
This came as a stunning surprise to the 
managers. 

Last month the stage hands had been 
offered an increase and new contract 
effective next month. That provided 
for a weekly wage of a little less than 
$40. The anion officials had expressed 
themselves at the time as gratified 
with the settlement. 

The latest demand of the stage hands 
is that they receive as much as the 
New York stage employes and insist 
upon an immediate adjustment. Grant- 
ing the demands will not affect the 
status of the stage hands and musicians 
in the present sympathy strike. . w 

With Sunday performances in Chi- 
cago if the new scale goes into effect 
it will bring the salary of the local 
stage hands to around $60 weekly. . ^ 






OFFICIAL STATEMENTS 



.•■■■• 



MANAGERS' ASSOCIATION. 

The Producing Managers' Association au- 
thorised the following statement last nlgbt: 

"The Actors' Equity Association proposal 
■ to the authors that it was willing to furnish 
a 4500,000 bond to guarantee 'its good faith 
in the future, was looked upon hy tbe Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association aa poor security 
for a business In which over SIOO.000,000 la 
invested. The Producing Managers' Associa- 
tion wants no bond. It wants to deal with 
a body of actors that has not demonstrated 
its complete disregard of property rights and 
contract rights. The Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion has branded itself as an advocate of in- 
dividual contract violation and thereby has 
destroyed all confidence that the managers 
may hare had In It. The authors asked the 
Producing Managers' Association to present 
their side of tbe case to the authors, only de- 
siring to know tbe facts and having no In- 
tention of interfering.' 

"The following day tbe authors, with none 
but the best Intentions, sought to Intervene. 
Tbe managers impressed upon them that the 
authors' and managers' interests were Iden- 
tical and .that the manager. In fighting for 
the preservation of the theatre, was fighting 
the author's battle ae well as his own." , 

An announcement in the form ot a letter 
was sent to the press yesterday signed by 
Marguerite Sylva, announcing her resignation 
from tbe A. E. A. and giving reasons. The 
letter contained no address of any press of- 
fice or department. It was dated from Dover, 
N. J., but was sent out hy some press agency. 



-EXTRA" PEOPLE AFFILIATING. 

Five hundred "extra" people engaged 
in picture work* held a meeting in 
Unity Hall Tuesday and steps were 
taken to form a protective association, 
that as soon as organized will become 
affiliated with the A. E. A. The meet- 
ing was informal, and according to 
the statement of Mr. DuPree, the open- 
ing speaker, was sponsored by the 
American Federation of Labor. 

One- of the first things the proposed 
organization of "extra" people will do, 
will be to eliminate agents and replace 
them with a co-operative booking 
office. Several speakers told of in- 
justices in the way of unfair commis- 
sion charges by agents last night, and' 
others spoke of irregularities that 
needed correction in the studios. 
v Last night's meeting had only 
reached the formative stage by 9:15, 
but from the general character of the 
speeches, it would seem that the 
"extras" have numerous grievances, 
which they will try to eliminate 
through the new organization. 

.Harry Brown a member of the A. 
E. A. Council, made an address, treat- 
ing in general of organization as a 
principle. A committee to select a 
name, and draw up a constitution and 
by laws was appointed. A call for 
another meeting, will' be issued shortly. 

One of the proposals made last night 
was that a minimum of $5.00 a day 
net be paid for "extra" work. A plan 
to standardize wages for small parts 
and "bits" usually played by types was 
■ also scheduled to be submitted to the 
"meeting for approval. 



. : . 



FRANK GILLMORE. 

The reports la the press this morning of the 
meeting with the managers and playwright* 
show a complete misconception on the part ot 
tbe managers. Tbe Actors' Equity Associa- 
tion ia not bolding out for a closed shop 
neither doea it purpose so doing, but would 
call attention to tbe very remarkably or- 
ganized closed shop that tbe Producing Man- 
agers' Association is indulging in at the pre- 
sent moment. 

The Hebrew Actors' Union Is In a vastly 
different position to that ot the Actors' Equity 
Association. With our many thousand mem- ' 
bers and wide-spread activities throughout 
the United States and Canada, it would be ' 
Impossible for the Actors' Equity Association 
to conduct and regulate Its affairs as can the 
Hebrew Actors' Union which ts centralized and 
working In a definite community of its own. 

Despite certain expressions from managers 
with regard to the Hebrew Actors' Union, per- 
sona] experience thereof has' shown me beauti- 
ful theatres with plays admirably performed 
by an excellent and happy cast, working under 
a successful, happy and considerate manage- 
ment, and above all, playing to bappy, n alie- 
ned and overflowing audiences, even onVA 
Monday nlgbt. %■ 

(signed) FRANK QILLMORB. 

STATEMENT of Paul N. Turner, attorney 
for Actors' Equity Ass'n. — — — 
On Tuesday a committee of playwrights, of 
whom Eugene Walter was the chairman, and 
representing moat of the leading play authors 
of tbe country, called on me. ' They said that ... 
after a conference with Wlnchell Smith, of 
the firm of Smith ft Golden, regarding the 
situation, Mr. Smith had given them to under- 
stand that if the Actors' Equity Association 
would go on record against wanting the 
"closed shop," the managers would be willing 
to come to terms with us and end the strike. 
They asked both the Equity, and the Produc- 
ing Managers to state their position, and both 
sides did. After hearing both stories, a com- 
mittee of the playwrights aajaln visited us, on 
Wednesday, and asked It we would put our 
pledge as to not wanting a "closed shop". In 
writing. I told them we would. Mr. Walter 
then asked of tbe managers would bond them- 
selves' to insure the carrying out of a con- 
tract, If we would be willing to do tbe samoT 
I told them we would. Mr. Walter asked K 
we would nut that la writing, and we wrote 
the following Utter: ; . " . - ;.v 

"Aug. 20, 1018, 
Comnftttee of Authors, ,■'. .:.'•• 

Hotel Astov, N. Y. 
Gentlemen: , 

Confirming What our* committee aald to 
you yesterday, we beg to advise that, 
upon a satisfactory adjustment ot the 
situation with the managers, we will agree 
on our behalf that our association will 
pledge Itself for the term of the contract 
which we enter Into with the managers, 
not to require a "closed shop"; and fur- 
ther, that upon entering into any con- 
tract mutually satisfactory, with the Pro- 
ducing Managers' Association, we .will 
not only pledge . our association under 
such contract, but also, reasonably bond 
its faithful performance the managers on 
tholr behalf to equally pledge themselves 
and their association and give a like 
bond. 

. , Yours very truly, 
(signed) Actors' Equity Association. 
. By FRANKGILLMORB, 

Executive Seo'y." 
Some time later on Wednenday afternoon, 
n committee of playwrights composed ot Eu- ' 
gene Walter, Rol Cooper Magrue, Eugene 
Buck, Owen Davis and Guy Bolton, called 
again and said that to tbelr great surprise 
the managers treated them very coldly and 
refused to even look at the written pledge 
glv-m them by tho Actors' Equity Association; ' 
The committee advised me that they had re- , 
turned o the main oommlttee of playwrights, '■ 
reported the conduct of the managers to them 
and thereupon tbe whole committee dissolved. 



18 



-tMULbJ . 








■'.•■ <•''■"•. -:\ '■'.':'.'•'•" > ■■■ ■'.■'■.?. '■", .■•■'■'•.'■ . ' ■"■'■':'; . • ' ■•.' .♦' : ■■' -..'■' L : ■ • '''■'*- . " 

DAILY BULLETIN— No. 12 



\'*4 




NEW YORK, FRIDAY, AUGUST 22, 1919 



■■. • . 



ALLEGING "ILLEGAL STRIKE ": 
WALK OUT CLOSES ONE MORE 



!■•• 



Managers Awaiting Gomper's Return. Claim Contract 

Breaking Constitutes "Illegal" Strike With Federation. 

Booth With "Better 'Ole" Taken By Stage Hands 

Last Night. 24 Shows Closed By Strike in New 

York; 8 in Chicago. 



• 



'.■■:' 



I 



if The stage hands last night took the 
Booth with 'The Better 'Ole" along 
with the other theatres that have been 
closed ia New York since the strike 
of the Actors' Equity Association 
started. It gives the closed list 24 
productions, five of which were an- 
nounced to open oh Broadway but 
failed at their premieres. In Chicago 
there were eight closed houses last 
night, with "Scandal" given permission 
to reopen through having no objec- 
tionable feature to the A. E. A. in pro- 
ducer or cast. The Olympic, Chicago, 
did not close Wednesday night, as re- 

1 ported elsewhere in this Bulletin. 
Nothing occurred of importance in 
the strife yesterday besides talk and 
the organization of the playwrights 
into a society of their own. The talk 
centered around the longful waiting 
of the x Producing Managers' Associa- 
tion for the return of Samuel Gom- 
pers, president of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. 

/ . The prospective action of '' Governor 

Al Smith upon his return to New York 

'.today was expected to be interesting 

tat least, but no advance line on what- 

5' ver meve the Governor might have 
ecided to make was at hand. 

The closing of the/Booth, after the 
protestation by Charles Coburn that 
he would keep that play open at all 
hazard, had been looked for from the 
outset of. the stake hands' sympathetic 
strike, something Mr. Coburn had not 
calculated upon/when issuing his posi- 
tive statement*. Since the strike Co-' 
burn has resigned from the A. E. A. 
and the Lambs' Club. He plays a role 
in the piece./ Some of the other parts 
have had four or five different players 
since the first walkout on the '"Ole" 
play. That came with the first orders, 
though the show did not then close. 

The impression is around that the 
managers have two objects in hold- 
ing off until the arrival of Mr. Gom- 
pers. He is expected in New York 
between today and Sunday. The 
managers hope to induce Gompers to 



rescind the action of the A. F. of L. in 
endorsing the A. E. A. strike. They 
will present as grounds . for this, ac- 
cording to the story, that under the' 
rules and regulations of the Federa- 
j tion governing strikes of its affiliated 
! unions, no legal strike can be called 
where a broken contract is involved. 

i The managers will impress upon 
Gompcr.3 through the walking out by 
the actors upon orders, without two 
'weeks', notice as called for in their 
contracts, that the A. E. A. strike is 
illegal, in so far as the A. F. of L. can 
see it, and through that the sanction 
of the Federation should be with- 
drawn. The other object is supposed 
lo be just plain reasoning, calling 
Gompers' attention to the general 
Btate of affairs and alleging bad faith 
/on the part of the A. E. A.' 
| Those who profess to understand 
the pleas to be placed before the 
Federation's president by the man- 
agers 'say that Mr. Gompers is quite 
likely to observe that since the strike 
has gone so far, with other unions be- 
side the actors now in it, the A. F. of 
L. ie not inclined to interfere at this 
! date. The same people claim that the 
| A. E. A. will make a strong point with 
I Gompers over the $500,000 damage suit 
' with the connection in the press mat- 
\ ter given out of the Danbury hatters' 
\ case. It seems universally admitted 
that it was a gigantic blunder on the 
'part of the managers to have given 
publicity to their implied threat 
'through mentioning the Danbury hat- 
ters in a strike matter of interest to 
all unions. It would not surprise the 
show people were they to learn that 
it was this particular mention, in con- 
junction with the damage action, that 
caused affirmative . votes in the stage 
/hands' and musicians' unions to go 
lout on a sympathetic strike with the 
I actors. 

The Louis Mann proposed opposi- 
tion society brought about some com- 
ment. It was looked upon as a suc- 
(Continued on page 2.) 



:■ "SCANDAL" MISSES. 

. Chicago, Aug. 21. 
"Scandal," the Walter Hast attrac- 
toin which was stopped at the Garrick 
through the walkout of stage hands 
and musicians, failed to reopen tonight. 
Numerous wires from. Mr. Hast in New 
York to the effect that the officials at 
A. E. A. headquarters had permitted 
the attraction to reopen, found no sanc- 
tion with the local Equity officials 
who had not received any advice from 
New York headquarters relating to 
"Scandal." \ 

Conformation was made at the A. E. 
A. headquarters late last night that 
"Scandal, one of the exempt Chicago 
attractions had failed to open, although 
telegrams . had been sent to Burton 
Churchill in charge of the situation 
in Chicago for the A. E. A,, suggesting 
that the attraction be allowed to re- 
sume. 

It was stated that the wires had 
evidently not arrived in time to al- 
low the show to open. 




COHAN FEELS CHEERFUL 

As he grows accustomed to the 
strike, George M. Cohan is seemingly 
growing more cheerful. In .the first 
few days of the fray Cohan was some- 
what depressed at the outlook, not 
relishing a strike between managers 
and factors with his many friends on 
both sides. 

That Cohan's good nature was un- 
dergoing a 'revival became noticeable 
the past few days when he laughed as 
stories circulated about "Cohan hav- 
ing a nervous breakdown" were re- 
ported to him. 



THREE PRODUCERS SCARED OFF. 

Three independent producers, who 
were ' entering the legitimate, have 
called off preparations because of the 
strike. Two were New York interests 
who had selected plays engaegd pro- 
ducers. The third producer is a Vir- 
ginian who, in canceling his arrange- 
ments, wrote he "didn't care to put 
money into an enterprise where there 
was no v responsibility." ■ . 

HIP IS EXEMPT. 

The Hippodrome, opening Saturday 
night, will be considered exempt as 
far as the Equity is concerned. 

The Hip, according to Grant Stewart, 
is classed by the A. E. A. as vaude- 
ville. This classification takes the Hip 
outside of the Equity's jurisdiction, ac- 
cording to Mr. Stewart. 

The L A. T. S. E.. when asked yester- 
day as to its attitude regarding the 
Hip, declined to make a statement. 



SPECULATOR PINCHED. 

James Dooley, a ticket specula tor, in 
a 46th street ticket office was arrested; 
last night upon the complaint of Rich- 
ard Gordon, charged with disposing of 
two tickets for the Lexington, lace 
value $2 each, for $5.50. 

Gordon is an A. E. A. member. He 
was dismissed in the 54th Street Court 
early in the week for picketing. He 
was in the ticket office and saw the 
sale made. The Lexington., is playing 
A. E. A. benefit performances. The 
actors' associatioin has attempted to 
keep the tickets away from the spec. 
Gordon went outside, called an officer, 
and accompanied back to the speculat- 
ing stand with the purchasers of the 
coupons, called upon the officer- to nuke 
the arrest. 

Dooley was taken to the Night Court 
Magistrate Corrigan fined Dooley $10. 
He stated he had made the sale with" 
out the knowledge of his employer and 
contrary to his instructions. The Mag- 
istrate in imposing the fine stipulated 
that the broker return the purchase 
price to the buyer. This was doac. - 

SHOPMEN OUT. 

All shopmen working on the build- 
ing of sets in the plants of the various 
producing managers in New York were 
ordered out by the I. A. T. S. E. yes- 
terday. . . -•.:••••':"•• 

Some of the men were informed 
Wednesday evening not to report lor 
work Thursday and by noon yesterday 
the walkout in that branch was eom- 
pUite, • ; ■ .. ■ Wf$$ 

A majority of the men affected are 
the highest paid stage workers. They 
are classed as heads of departments 
by managers and known as master" >if 
penters, master, property meat and 
master electricians. 

The number of productions originally 
planned for the fall tied up by the new 
strike order was not learned but ia 
some shops as many as five shews 
were under construction. 



\'W 



• M 



ENLISTING THE CHURCH. 

^•A,, movement was launched by the ^ 
Equity yesterday to enlist the aid of 
clergymen of every denomination in u 
its behalf in the strike. 

The plan calls for mention of the 
actors' fight for recognition from the/ 
pulpits, not only in New York but 
throughout the U. S. :.•.■..."" >, 

According to the A. B. A.. se>er*» 
prominent d [vines of the leading r«U«~ •& 
ious faiths have agreed to assist the . 

ft H or i pypulpiL references. Satjurday 

and Sunday. '•;,:;;, • '■•'.*;' ' 



V, — - 



19 







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Whether Gus Edwards is making his 
farewell appearance in his present of- 
fering at the Palace this week, or for 
all time, was not quite clear. Vincent 
OjDonnell has added an Irish Cole en 
number, appearing in green character- 
istic garb, and Hazel Furness has re- 
placed clever Beatrice Curtis in the 
act. A white net with split overskirt; 
trimmed with rows of blue satin rib- 
bon frills, put on in scallops appeared 
to be new. A metallic lace small hat, 
was encircled with blue ribbon as was 
the waist, and a pink chiffon ruffled 
dress with a broad blue satin sash was 
dainty on the blond Miss Furness. 

Venita Gould in impressions of pop- 
ular stars pleased immensely, making 
a little speech of thanks in which she 
said this was her first appearance at 
Palace. Miss Gould is one of the 
puzzles of vaudeville— for if talent 
stands for anything, she should be in 
the front ranks of featured women. 
In white pompadour silk— the overskirt 
draped up at sides on a georgette yoke 
—and just a bit of lace petticoat show- 
ing below it, she was becomingly at- 
tired. Ropes of white beads fell over 
shoulder and from a crescent shaped 
ornament of brilliants, in back, giving 
a long sailor collar effect 

Herbert Clifton had a lavendar and 
yellow georgette sbubret dress, the • 
bodice covered with huge orchid 
plumes, some of which ran down in 
the skirt. It was good style— masculine 
pants persistingly falling below the 
skirt, over the feminine looking nether 
extremities offered good satire. 

Over a green and gold gown, there 
was a plum silk wrap— with long front 
of cherry embroidered in gold. Black 
and white fur squares were seemingly 
half joined together as stoll like and 
arm decorations, and a four tier 
Chinese gold pagoda was worn for 
headdress. . 

The young woman with the Flying 
Martins made herself useful in white 
silk short pants arid tunic, the latter 
edged top and bottom with white mar- 
about. 

Helen Moretti was the "class" of the 
American bill the first heat as to looks 
and style. In a silver-spangled gown 
with the sort of side flounces that 
cling and a silver rope loosely tied 
about body, she was an attractive pic- 
ture. ; . .. 

The White Steppers are dressing 
their act in all white and must buy 
satin by the bolt with the yards and 
yards they require for their wardrobe. 

Dorothy and Buster are a good pair 
of kids. A blue chambray skirt but- 
toned on a white guimpe and a big 
Dorothy Dainty bow adorned the head 
of .the curly girlie, while the short- 
haired one dressed up in 14-year-old 
boy's knicker suits. There was a 
change from, light to dark for Buster 
and Dorothy wore a dark blue silk 
coat, and lingerie and lace hat, over 
a ruffled white chiffon dress, for the 
finale. ■".-'. 

About all you could see of the wom- 
an in the Harold Selman and Co. 
sketch was a pink dress, and the wom- 
an in the Ohas. McGoods act was 
smartly attired, as last time, in riding 
(bre